David Cotterrell Art Projects

  1. A BBC feature on the sculpture, Hill33, reflecting on its evolving form as it became heavily overgrown and began to decay back into the forest. The segment was broadcast as part of the program, 'Countryfile', on 11th November, 2012.

    # vimeo.com/259220354 Uploaded
  2. A short feature on British Forces Broadcasting covering the realisation of the Hill33 project.

    # vimeo.com/258946599 Uploaded
  3. Mirror III : Horizon is part of the “Mirror” project, a series of two-screen works devised to provide insight into global communities that experience distancing and objectification. “Mirror” experiments with perspective in order to challenge common human assumptions and provide insight into nuanced personal and collective narratives.

    Mirror III : Horizon examines what might transpire between two strangers if their communication was reduced to the language of lights.

    Filmed in Malta, set against the dramatic edges of the island’s stunning coast and contextualized by the island’s deep historical experience of visitors who arrived repeatedly by sea, the installation draws on the fluctuating paranoia of the current refugee crisis. Mirror III examines what might possibly be communicated between strangers if their words were reduced to beams of light and their faces need never be revealed.

    Mirror III is presented as a two-screen filmed project, showing the dynamic dialogue between a light on shore and a light at sea.

    In preparation for Mirror III, a prototype iPhone app has been developed to send, receive and interpret Morse Code – a form of communication used traditionally to convey a situation of human emergency.

    Mirror III : Horizon was made in collaboration with the Sri Lankan playwright and theatre director, Ruwanthie de Chickera, grew through research and conversations with residents of Malta and was presented as part of the Pop-Up Creative Hub, at the 7th World Summit of IFACCA, Valetta, October 2016.

    Assistance with filming was provided by Lucy Conway, Matthew Attard, Sean Buttigieg, Fareeda Atwan, Alexandra Pace. Input into the project was given by Victor Jacono, Michelle Calleja Chehab of Kopin, Klaus of Seawatch, Spazju Kreattiv, Glen Calleja, Mario of Fabian Enterprises, Malta, Liam Gauci (Maritime Museum) and Nikolay Bogoev. Facilitating the entire process were Peter Jenkinson, Shelagh Wright and Caldon Merceica.

    # vimeo.com/188534359 Uploaded
  4. Mazar, Texas was originally developed with curator and artist Laray Polk for Code Yellow at Central Trak and UTD Gallery, Dallas.

    A large-scale, immersive work projected in a circular room, Mazar, Texas comprises footage shot by the artist in desert regions of the United States and Afghanistan. Cotterrell recorded journeys through Big Bend National Park in 2010 and Mazar-i-sharif in 2008 and, in 2014, stitched these together to create a cohesive, convincing vision of a desert that does not exist. The score accompanying the work is a mixture of the ambient sound recorded at both locations and the processed noise of a domestic UAV. Drones are known to both regions: in Afghanistan they carry lethal potential; in the United States they document illegal entry into the country.

    Mazar, Texas takes some of its inspiration from the virtually identical creation myths surrounding the deserts of both Big Bend and Mazar-i-sharif, in which God, having made the world, realises there is a mass of material left over and throws the waste of his creation to the earth to make the desert.

    "According to Indian legend, when the Great Creator made the earth and finished placing the stars in the sky, the birds in the air, and the fish in the sea, there was a large pile of rejected stony materials left over. Finished with His job, He threw this into one heap and made the Big Bend”

    Ross Maxwell, geologist and first superintended, Big Bend National Park.

    “Many years ago a wise old Afghan Mujahed once told me the mythical story of how God made Afghanistan. ‘When Allah had mode the rest of the world, He saw that there was a lot of rubbish left over, bits and pieces and things that did not fit anywhere else. He Collected them all together and threw them down on to the earth. That was Afghansitan,’ the old man said.”

    Ahmed Rashid, Pakistani journalist and author of Taliban: Militant Islam, Oil and Fundamentalism in Central Asia, First Edition, 2000.

    # vimeo.com/104887790 Uploaded
  5. Mazar, Texas was originally developed with curator and artist Laray Polk for Code Yellow at Central Trak and UTD Gallery, Dallas.

    A large-scale, immersive work projected in a circular room, Mazar, Texas comprises footage shot by the artist in desert regions of the United States and Afghanistan. Cotterrell recorded journeys through Big Bend National Park in 2010 and Mazar-i-sharif in 2008 and, in 2014, stitched these together to create a cohesive, convincing vision of a desert that does not exist. The score accompanying the work is a mixture of the ambient sound recorded at both locations and the processed noise of a domestic UAV. Drones are known to both regions: in Afghanistan they carry lethal potential; in the United States they document illegal entry into the country.

    Mazar, Texas takes some of its inspiration from the virtually identical creation myths surrounding the deserts of both Big Bend and Mazar-i-sharif, in which God, having made the world, realises there is a mass of material left over and throws the waste of his creation to the earth to make the desert.

    "According to Indian legend, when the Great Creator made the earth and finished placing the stars in the sky, the birds in the air, and the fish in the sea, there was a large pile of rejected stony materials left over. Finished with His job, He threw this into one heap and made the Big Bend”

    Ross Maxwell, geologist and first superintended, Big Bend National Park.

    “Many years ago a wise old Afghan Mujahed once told me the mythical story of how God made Afghanistan. ‘When Allah had mode the rest of the world, He saw that there was a lot of rubbish left over, bits and pieces and things that did not fit anywhere else. He Collected them all together and threw them down on to the earth. That was Afghansitan,’ the old man said.”

    Ahmed Rashid, Pakistani journalist and author of Taliban: Militant Islam, Oil and Fundamentalism in Central Asia, First Edition, 2000.

    # vimeo.com/104889364 Uploaded

David Cotterrell Art Projects

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