Death of Place

“…I am older and uglier
and full of the knowledge
that I do not belong to beauty
and beauty does not belong to me.
I have learned to accept
whatever men choose to give me
or whatever they choose to withhold,
but oh my desert
yours is the only death I cannot bear.” - 'Requiem for Sonora' by Richard Shelton

Cloudy Ridge Productions presents an important and timely film about archaeological preservation. Interviewee's include archaeologists Jonathan Till, Winston Hurst, literary scholar Craig Childs, Navajo historian Clyde Benally, Laguna Puebloan Patricia Sandoval, geologist/archaeologist Rich Friedman, and rock art expert Joe Pachak. Copyright 2015 Cloudy Ridge Productions

Music by:
Moby moby.com/
Jaquie Gipson jaquiegipson.com/

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Death of Place

Cloudy Ridge Productions Plus

The core message of Death of Place is the importance of individual responsibility and stewardship of archaeologically significant sites. Death of Place addresses the need for individuals to recognize the importance of caring for these places so that


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The core message of Death of Place is the importance of individual responsibility and stewardship of archaeologically significant sites. Death of Place addresses the need for individuals to recognize the importance of caring for these places so that we retain a complete history of ourselves and our journey through time.

Interviews with numerous experts is interspersed with footage of ancient art, architecture, and artifacts. Archeologists, native historians, rock art experts, and geologists, and renowned authors have all participated in this film. Each interviewee has an intimate relationship with this land and this ancient culture as well as their unique opinion on how to best preserve and protect this vital piece of cultural history. This documentary film and additional vignettes shown here fully describe the importance of landscape and archeological preservation and outline in detail the steps necessary to protect our cultural assets and prevent a ‘death of place’. Solutions to this problem range from legislation at a federal level to cultivating a personal ethic of stewardship; all will be presented in the film.

Understanding past cultures is of utmost importance to our global community. We must learn from the past and preserve the knowledge that has taken our species centuries to acquire. Without archeological sites by which to study ancient cultures we are destined to remake mistakes unnecessarily. Just a few short years ago, one could hike almost anywhere in southeast Utah or northwest New Mexico and see the living history of this once vast culture. Walk along those same paths and canyons today and one can see how nearly everything has been removed. Today, people are missing the point on how to properly conserve and take care of the land. The public desperately needs to know precisely how close we are to losing this precious part of the history of ourselves and forgetting that we are part of a very long timeline. They need to see that casual ignorance and direct exploitation are rapidly erasing the Ancestral Pueblo culture, as well as many other ancient cultures around the globe, from human civilization’s collective memory. We cannot learn from the past if we cannot remember it. "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" - George Santayan

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