Empathy: The Development and Disintegration of Human Connection

  1. Part of "Empathy: The Development and Disintegration of Human Connection"
    A symposium sponsored by the Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior
    January 17, 2013 | Bornstein Amphitheater | Brigham & Women's Hospital

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    Carl D. Marci, MD, is the Director of Social Neuroscience for the Psychotherapy
    Research Program, an attending staff psychiatrist in the Department of Psychiatry at
    the Massachusetts General Hospital, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard
    Medical School, a Visiting Lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Program in Media Arts & Sciences, and a Diplomat of the American Board of
    Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Marci received his M.A. in psychology and philosophy
    at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar and then completed his M.D. with honors
    at Harvard Medical School. He is a graduate of the MGH/McLean Adult Psychiatry
    Training Program and has won several awards including the Harvard Medical
    School sponsored Livingston Award for Young Investigators, Kaplan Fellowships for
    Research, and recently the NARSAD Young Investigator Award. He is also the 2001
    recipient of the American College of Psychiatrists Laughlin Award and 2003 recipient
    of the Harvard Psychiatry Mysell Research Award. Dr. Marci's current research
    interest involves the use of innovative platforms for recording psychophysiology
    combined with voice features, behavioral measures, and psychosocial measures of
    social-emotional processes, empathy and alliance during psychotherapy. Other
    projects include the physiology of laughter during psychotherapy, the physiology and
    neurobiology of emotion, and the physiologic and behavioral measures of
    depression response to treatment. His goal is to quantify the relationship between
    physiologic measures, emotions and social interaction in a variety of settings to help
    improve our understanding of empathy, learning, and human inter-relatedness. His
    work has been featured in multiple mainstream media pieces including in
    Newsweek, The Boston Globe, and FOX News.

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  2. Part of "Empathy: The Development and Disintegration of Human Connection"
    A symposium sponsored by the Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior
    January 17, 2013 | Bornstein Amphitheater | Brigham & Women's Hospital

    ---------------------
    Judith Edersheim, JD, MD is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard
    Medical School, a senior consultant to the Law and Psychiatry Service at
    Massachusetts General Hospital, and Co-Director of the Center for Law, Brain
    and Behavior. Dr. Edersheim graduated magna cum laude from Brown
    University and attended law school at Harvard, where she graduated cum laude.
    She was a law clerk to the Honorable Robert W. Sweet, United States District
    Judge for the Southern District of New York, and practiced law at the firm of Hill
    and Barlow before returning to Harvard Medical School. She received her clinical
    psychiatry training at the Cambridge Hospital adult psychiatry residency program
    before completing a fellowship in the Law and Psychiatry service at Massachusetts
    General Hospital. She is a member of the Bar of the Commonwealth of
    Massachusetts, is licensed to practice medicine in Massachusetts and is Board
    Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, with added
    qualifications in Forensic Psychiatry. Dr. Edersheim has performed a wide variety
    of forensic evaluations in both civil and criminal settings, including evaluations of
    competencies to stand trial, testamentary capacity, the capacity to make medical
    decisions, fitness for duty, the assessment of emotional damages, diminished
    capacity and criminal responsibility. She is a principal lecturer in the forensic
    psychiatry fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital and teaches forensic
    psychiatry to adult psychiatry residents at MGH and McLean Hospitals. Dr.
    Edersheim teaches extensively in the legal arena, including lectures sponsored
    by the Boston Bar Association, the Judicial Institute, and the Mental Health Legal
    Advisor’s Committee.

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  3. Part of "Empathy: The Development and Disintegration of Human Connection"
    A symposium sponsored by the Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior
    January 17, 2013 | Bornstein Amphitheater | Brigham & Women's Hospital

    ---------------------
    Alice Flaherty, MD, PhD, is a joint associate professor of both neurology and psychiatry
    at HMS. Her practice is at MGH. Her education was preparation H, in that she
    did an AB, MD, internship, residency, and fellowship at Harvard. In an attempt
    at diversity, she did a PhD at MIT, one mile away. In the MGH department of
    neurology, she is the director of the movement disorders fellowship, co-director
    of its brain stimulator unit, and has a particular interest in the overlap between
    mood and movement disorders. Her research focuses on brain systems that
    control behavioral drives, whether to walk, to communicate, or to create, and
    how these are influenced by interventions ranging from dopaminergic drugs to
    phototherapy to deep brain stimulation. In addition to scientific papers, she is
    the author of The MGH Handbook of Neurology; The Midnight Disease (a book
    for general audiences on the biological drive to communicate), and The Luck of
    the Loch Ness Monster (a children’s book on the biology of picky eating). Each
    of her books has received national awards and had multiple translations. Two
    have been dramatized. She has appeared as an expert on many TV documentaries,
    both nationally and internationally. Her current project on the neurology
    of illness behaviors, was awarded a fellowship from the Radcliffe Institute for
    Advanced Study, and was the focus of the 2008 David Rockefeller Winter
    Institute. She examines the mechanisms by which behavioral responses to
    illness, such as somatization and stoicism, are both biologically based and
    alterable by experience. Her interest in empathy and dispassion, which are
    secondary illness behaviors, made her aware of the extent to which doctors’
    gestural communication is biologically based and teachable as well.

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  4. Part of "Empathy: The Development and Disintegration of Human Connection"
    A symposium sponsored by the Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior
    January 17, 2013 | Bornstein Amphitheater | Brigham & Women's Hospital

    ------------------
    WBUR's Martha Bebinger moderates a conversation between the panelists on how empathy varies between individuals, the neural basis for this capacity, and whether we should steer people with more or less empathic capacity to careers based on this capacity.

    # vimeo.com/61816663 Uploaded 153 Plays 0 Comments

Empathy: The Development and Disintegration of Human Connection

On January 17, CLBB and the Boston Society for Neurology and Psychiatry hosted an evening event at Brigham and Women’s Hospital to explore and discuss the neuroscience of empathy: what we are learning about how and when this capacity fails, and whether…


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On January 17, CLBB and the Boston Society for Neurology and Psychiatry hosted an evening event at Brigham and Women’s Hospital to explore and discuss the neuroscience of empathy: what we are learning about how and when this capacity fails, and whether these failures — which can have consequences ranging from therapeutic breaches to unthinkable crimes that defy our understanding — can be rehabilitated.

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