Exercise Tiger 1944 Slapton Sands South Devon England & telling The Veterans Story

Frank Rohlman, U. S. Navy, (deceased June 1996) a survivor from LST 507, tells his story to his daughter, Linda Rohlman Pennington in April 1996...

What happened during the early hours on the morning of April 28 1944 will live forever in the memories of those men, who, through incredible odds survived this horrible ordeal.
exercisetigermemorial.co.uk

The men of the 507 found themselves thrown into a situation that they thought would never happen on a rehearsal run.
Before the attack, the men sat down below, on their bunks never believing that something would go terribly wrong.
Patrick "Patsy" Giacchi was one of those men, who was down below in the ship.
In an interview, he told how he and his friends sat in their bunks relaxing after a hard day's work.
The men played cards, sang along with the ukulele, wrote to love ones, and talked about what they would do when they got back, never thinking that they might not make it back.
While relaxing, Patsy heard scrapping noises, and then he got knocked off his stretcher.
He feared that something was wrong, but the others told him not to worry because it was a "dry run." Ignoring the assurances of his comrades, Patsy put on his shoes and helmet and went up top anyway.
When the torpedo made the direct hit, Patsy's friends down below did not have much of a chance to escape.
Exercise Tiger 1944 Slapton Sands South Devon England & telling The Veterans Story

# vimeo.com/426527850 Uploaded

Exercise Tiger 1944 Slapton Sands South Devon England & telling The Veterans Story

CeeVisK PRO

Come on a journey with us to discover the definitive story behind "Exercise Tiger 1944"
OFFICIAL Exercise Tiger website: exercisetigermemorial.co.uk
Email for CeeVisK HD Film Production; ckirsten2011@btinternet.com

THE PHOTO OF "BESSIE"…


+ More

Come on a journey with us to discover the definitive story behind "Exercise Tiger 1944"
OFFICIAL Exercise Tiger website: exercisetigermemorial.co.uk
Email for CeeVisK HD Film Production; ckirsten2011@btinternet.com

THE PHOTO OF "BESSIE" ABOVE....
In the foreground on the sand are rolls of mesh ‘Sommerfeld Tracking’ (named after German expatriate engineer, Kurt Joachim Sommerfeld), used to strengthen weak and viscous surfaces.
In the centre of the frame is an American Sherman M-10 tank destroyer named “Bessie” equipped with special boxes that protected the engine from the ingress of water, also visible is a Caterpillar D-8 bulldozer, used by the allies in landings for clearing the beaches.
The photo also shows two landing craft LCT class numbered 27 and 53.

At the back, is a large tank landing ship LST-325, which subsequently was involved in transporting troops and equipment onto the Normandy beaches.
After the war, she was sold to Greece and served in it’s Navy until 1999.
In 2000 LST 325 was bought back by the United States and now serves as a memorial to ships of this class in Evansville Indiana.

With the help of two "Tiger" Veterans Floyd and John and with Families representing their lost ones from America.
They travelled to Britain for the 70th Exercise Tiger Memorial Service held on the 28th of April 2013 - 2014 and made it possible for us to collate many personal facts, stories and images along with archive footage and we have incorporated these shared memories and experiences into one definitive hour long film.

Although very personal to these Families and with the leading support of Laurie Bolton and myself as the filmmaker we can share with you their story and help better understand the events that took place during this sad and tragic episode of WWII - Filmed and Produced by CeeVisK HD International
abmc.gov/multimedia/videos/cambridge-american-cemetery.

The morning of April 28 will live forever in the memories of those men, who, through incredible odds, survived the horrible ordeal. The men of the 507 found themselves thrown into a situation that they thought would never happen on a rehearsal run. Before the attack, the men sat down below, on their bunks never believing that something would go terribly wrong. Patrick "Patsy" Giacchi was one of those men, who was down below in the ship. In an interview, he told how he and his friends sat in their bunks relaxing after a hard day's work. The men played cards, sang along with the ukulele, wrote to love ones, and talked about what they would do when they got back, never thinking that they might not make it back. While relaxing, Patsy heard scrapping noises, and then he got knocked off his stretcher. He feared that something was wrong, but the others told him not to worry because it was a "dry run." Ignoring the assurances of his comrades, Patsy put on his shoes and helmet and went up top anyway.7 When the torpedo made the direct hit, Patsy's friends down below did not have much of a chance to escape.
vimeo.com/ceevisk/review/105549223/62597719d9
multivu.com/mnr/7062152-abmc-honors-americans-buried-overseas-wwi-wwii-memorial-day-2014

Browse This Channel

Shout Box

  • CeeVisK

    What happened during the early hours on the morning of April 28 1944 will live forever in the memories of those men, who, through incredible odds survived this horrible ordeal.
    exercisetigermemorial.co.uk

    by CeeVisK

  • CeeVisK

    LST 510: Landed Tanks on D-Day is Now a Converted Car Ferry
    Joseph O'Brien Mar 9, 2019
    Among their crews it was joked that LST stood for “Large Slow
    Target.”
    Report Advertisement
    The D-Day operation took place almost eighty years ago. Practically every single ship, plane, and tank, and even the men, who took part in this operation have been retired, scrapped, or passed away. All over the world, veteran planes and ships from this operation continue to live honored and comfortable retirements in museums and as displays. But incredibly, there are a few D-Day ships that still earn their keep with active careers.
    One of these is more unlikely then the rest as it was designed to be a short-lived assault craft. While most of her sisters were scrapped long ago, this one still carries on today, albeit in a very modified form.
    This lone hard-working survivor is now the car ferry known as the M/V Cape Henlopen, but she was once known by the military designation of LST 510.
    The Landing Ship, Tank (LST) was an American innovation designed to allow the landing of both armored and unarmored vehicles on a beach instead of requiring a port. These vessels were crewed mostly by reservists and Coast Guardsmen who were as new and inexperienced as the ships they were on.

    The LST looked and functioned like a cargo ship in that it was designed to transport large numbers of vehicles, which were loaded on conventionally at a port. From that point its performance was entirely different, however. The LST had a secret weapon: a ramp hidden inside a door on its bow. It was also designed with a smooth flat bottom to enable it to sail directly up onto or as close to shore as possible.
    USS LST-325 (left) and USS LST-388 unloading while stranded at low tide during the Normandy Invasion in June 1944. Note: propellers, rudders, and other underwater details of these LSTs; 40 mm single guns; “Danforth” style kedge anchor at LST-325ʼs stern.
    It would beach itself, open its bow doors, drop the ramp, and then allow vehicles to drive out onto a beachhead and go directly into combat from there. This avoided a need for docks or cranes to unload vehicles, shaving hours or even days off the time typically

    needed to get armor into the battle.
    LSTs are credited by some, including General Eisenhower, as one of the inventions that allowed the Allies to win the Second World War. With the LST delivering armor with no port facility needed, they could concentrate more forces into an invasion area faster than the enemy could reinforce their defenses.
    A Canadian LST off-loads an M4 Sherman during the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943

    LSTs saw service around the globe during WWII, getting most of their fame in Normandy and the Pacific island-hopping operations. But the Navy lost a large portion of their number in the process.
    LSTs were mass-produced and designed to have short service lives. They were designed to fulfill a purpose, not to be comfortable, or fast, or even heavily-armed. They were susceptible to bad weather, mechanical breakdowns, and enemy attacks at any time. Many were lost to accidents but many more to combat damage.
    Among their crews it was joked that LST stood for “Large Slow Target.” Many of them would not survive the war or post-war scrapping of the massive fleet that was built in the course of the war.
    Bren Gun Carriers being loaded at Bone Harbour through the bow doors of HMS BACHAQUERO, an LST specially constructed for the task.

    Surprisingly enough a few do live on in Third World navies or as museums. The Philippines still use two even today as fishery vessels and a floating barracks. Several other navies have them floating around, though mostly as storage vessels at this point. No first line navy still uses one.
    The Last Operating LST (LST-325)


    m.warhistoryonlin e.com/instant-articles/lst- 510-from-d-day-to-a-car- ferry.html?jwsource=cl
    There is only one in North America still in active everyday use, but youʼd never know it to look at her. LST-510 was built in 1943 in Jeffersonville, Indiana. She was quickly sent overseas and served at Normandy, delivering supplies on June 6 to the bloody cauldron that was Omaha Beach. She ran several voyages, delivering vehicles and supplies for the invasion forces.
    Her career was mostly marked with mishaps unfortunately. Lots of groundings and breakdowns made her somewhat a hard luck ship.

    She was being prepared to aid the fight against Japan when the war ended.
    The service bar on USS-LST-510, Buncombe County. Photo: Mark Ameres CC BY 3.0
    After the war she continued in naval service but was mostly in the inactive fleet. The Navy eventually renamed her the Buncombe County after a region in North Carolina. She would continue to serve until 1955.
    She was then taken out of commissioned service and sold into commercial hands. She was converted to become a car ferry. Changing names and owners multiple times, she eventually ended up serving as a car ferry between Connecticut and Long Island.

    The plaque on the USS Buncombe County, USS-LST-510.Photo: Ameres CC BY 3.0
    Read another story from us: From Texas to Japan aboard a LST – Putting The Men Ashore To Win The War
    In 1983 she underwent a refit and modernization which removed most clues to her wartime service. The most you will see, unless you know where to look, is a plaque and decorations on her rebuilt bridge wings.
    She was given new engines in 1995 and is still in service with no planned date of retirement. This last D-Day vet is still proudly sailing the ocean in her 8th decade. If you go to Connecticut or Long Island, keep an eye out for this old veteran on her daily runs.

    by CeeVisK

  • CeeVisK

    youtu.be/LkZZMkmGxFY
    The only known, surviving and seaworthy S-boot S-130, was built at the Johann Schlichting boatyard as hull number 1030 in Travemünde, on the Baltic Coast.

    Commissioned on October 21st 1943, her Commanding Officer was Oberleutnant zur See Gunter Rabe, she was assigned to the 9th S-Boot Flotilla under the command of Korvettenkapitän Götz Freiherr von Mirbach, one of the most famous S-Boot commanders of the war.
    With a range of up to 700 miles and a crew of 35, S130 was used as a fast-attack craft, for mine-laying, targeting submarines with depth charges and for covert operations.
    Built largely of lightweight wood and aluminum, it was powered by three 2,500-horsepower diesel engines.
    The S-boat was based in Cherbourg, France, where it earned notoriety as part of the flotilla that ravaged a U.S. convoy during Exercise Tiger.
    Exercise Tiger 1944 Slapton Sands South Devon England & telling The Veterans Story.
    German authorities credited the S130’s crew with half of a “kill” after launching one torpedo which struck LST 507 during Exercise Tiger, at least 175 American soldiers and sailors aboard the landing craft were later confirmed dead.
    exercisetigermemorial.co.uk/
    After the Normandy invasion, it was seized by Britain and used by intelligence service MI6 as a British Baltic Fishery Protection Service, to infiltrate spies behind the Iron Curtain.
    It was subsequently returned to the German navy and used to train sailors in underwater weaponry before being decommissioned in 1991.
    It later served as a houseboat before being brought to Britain and falling into disrepair.
    The last-known remaining craft of its type was bought by British military vehicle collector Kevin Wheatcroft, who is spending about 5 million pounds to return the boat to its original condition.
    Restoring the craft is a painstaking process that is expected to take about five years.
    The ship’s guts have been stripped out and its armoured wheelhouse and bridge removed, the next step is for a 40ft keel weighing about two tons to be installed.
    To complete the parts that were missing when Kevin purchased S130, he commissioned a team of divers to recover items from three E-boats that had been scuttled off the coast of Denmark.

    As owner of the world’s largest privately held collection of military vehicles, Kevin Wheatcroft envisions the restored vessel as being a “living memorial to all sailors who died during World War II.
    It’s the only example of its type left in the world” he said, “I want it to become like something brought back from the past”.
    vimeo.com/ceevisk/review/131336985/588ab80c05
    S-boats were configured with three diesel engines driving three prop shafts, specially developed MAN and Daimler Benz engines were fitted in the early S-boats.
    Although equal in horsepower, the in-line MAN motors tended to produce excessive vibration and had a high center of gravity, this led to breakdowns and unacceptable stresses on the boats’ light motor mounts.
    In 1938 the Naval staff decided upon the reliable 20 Cylinder 2000hp MB501 V-engine as the standard S-boat powerplant.
    The MB501 proved highly dependable and a versatile basis for later improvements such as the addition of superchargers.
    The final versions of the MB501 could propel the 100 ton boat to speeds of 43.8 knots.
    Situated in the middle of the hull, the engine room reflected thorough German planning and smart design inherent in the entire S-Boat program.
    Although noisy, it was spacious, well ventilated and illuminated by skylights; conduits and wiring were neatly laid out to allow accessibility for quick identification and repair.
    The risk of fire was greatly diminished by the use of diesel fuel and by a built-in Ardex fire extinguishing system.
    Aircraft style instrument panels monitored performance of the three engines and instructions from the bridge were received on a miniature engine room telegraph.
    Kevin Wheatcroft aims to rebuild the S130 so that it performs exactly as it did when it left the Johann Schlichting boatyard in 1943…
    “The idea is that you’ll really step back in time, however finding the bits is some task — we’re looking for mundane things like sinks, wash basins, the galley cooker, knives, forks and plates”.
    With this in mind, coupled with Kevin’s reputation for attention to detail and superb restorations, this boat will be stunning when completed.
    Mechanic monitors instruments.
    On his right, the engine telegraph.
    Although the engines were technological marvels, it still took well trained crewmen with steady nerves to keep them running.

    by CeeVisK

Heads up: the shoutbox will be retiring soon. It’s tired of working, and can’t wait to relax. You can still send a message to the channel owner, though!

Channels are a simple, beautiful way to showcase and watch videos. Browse more Channels.