1. Nanomanipulation using an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an application with lots of potential and expectations in the area of nanotechnology, because it allows to create and manipulate structures at the atomic level.

    But nanomanipulation has limitations: it takes long time and is unintuitive. These limitations are due to mechanical manipulations are done with the tip of the AFM probe, and this probe can't be used to image and manipulate simultaneously. Therefore the nanomanipulation process is performed blindly; without real-time visual feedback. For this reason a nanomanipulation is a slow process that takes a reference image. performs a manipulation based on this image and then takes an image again to validate the manipulation. The lack of intuitiveness is due to commercial AFMs provide only keyboard and mouse nanomanipulation control, as well.

    The Cervantes Haptic Control application (CHC) allows to control an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using an haptic device (stylus type) and provides three operation modes (with GUI): training, exploration and nanomanipulation.
    - The training mode allows the operator to load and AFM image and become familiar with the haptic control, the sample surface and train the nanomanipulation procedure.
    - The exploration mode allows the operator to trace out the sample surface with visual and force feedback in real-time without modifying its surface.
    - The nanomanipulation mode allows the operator to modify a region of interest in a more intuitive way because of force feedback (not blindly) and stylus joystick (not keyboard/mouse). Also it reduces the time of the experiment because it graphs quickly the modified region of interest after the manipulation (quick change between exploration mode and nanomanipulation mode).

    CHC includes many configuration options for the characterizacion of samples. Its modular design allows future expansions (force spectroscopy mode with force map, adaptation to other AFM probes, etc.) and can be adapted to other AFM and haptic devices.

    AFM model: Cervantes Fullmode AFM System, manufactured by Nanotec Electrónica.
    Haptic devices: Phantom Desktop and Omni Phantom, manufactured by Geomagic.

    # vimeo.com/77960970 Uploaded 72 Plays 0 Comments
  2. Nanomanipulation using an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an application with lots of potential and expectations in the area of nanotechnology, because it allows to create and manipulate structures at the atomic level.

    But nanomanipulation has limitations: it takes long time and is unintuitive. These limitations are due to mechanical manipulations are done with the tip of the AFM probe, and this probe can't be used to image and manipulate simultaneously. Therefore the nanomanipulation process is performed blindly; without real-time visual feedback. For this reason a nanomanipulation is a slow process that takes a reference image. performs a manipulation based on this image and then takes an image again to validate the manipulation. The lack of intuitiveness is due to commercial AFMs provide only keyboard and mouse nanomanipulation control, as well.

    The Cervantes Haptic Control application (CHC) allows to control an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using an haptic device (stylus type) and provides three operation modes (with GUI): training, exploration and nanomanipulation.
    - The training mode allows the operator to load and AFM image and become familiar with the haptic control, the sample surface and train the nanomanipulation procedure.
    - The exploration mode allows the operator to trace out the sample surface with visual and force feedback in real-time without modifying its surface.
    - The nanomanipulation mode allows the operator to modify a region of interest in a more intuitive way because of force feedback (not blindly) and stylus joystick (not keyboard/mouse). Also it reduces the time of the experiment because it graphs quickly the modified region of interest after the manipulation (quick change between exploration mode and nanomanipulation mode).

    CHC includes many configuration options for the characterizacion of samples. Its modular design allows future expansions (force spectroscopy mode with force map, adaptation to other AFM probes, etc.) and can be adapted to other AFM and haptic devices.

    AFM model: Cervantes Fullmode AFM System, manufactured by Nanotec Electrónica.
    Haptic devices: Phantom Desktop and Omni Phantom, manufactured by Geomagic.

    # vimeo.com/77960972 Uploaded 25 Plays 0 Comments
  3. Nanomanipulation using an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an application with lots of potential and expectations in the area of nanotechnology, because it allows to create and manipulate structures at the atomic level.

    But nanomanipulation has limitations: it takes long time and is unintuitive. These limitations are due to mechanical manipulations are done with the tip of the AFM probe, and this probe can't be used to image and manipulate simultaneously. Therefore the nanomanipulation process is performed blindly; without real-time visual feedback. For this reason a nanomanipulation is a slow process that takes a reference image. performs a manipulation based on this image and then takes an image again to validate the manipulation. The lack of intuitiveness is due to commercial AFMs provide only keyboard and mouse nanomanipulation control, as well.

    The Cervantes Haptic Control application (CHC) allows to control an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using an haptic device (stylus type) and provides three operation modes (with GUI): training, exploration and nanomanipulation.
    - The training mode allows the operator to load and AFM image and become familiar with the haptic control, the sample surface and train the nanomanipulation procedure.
    - The exploration mode allows the operator to trace out the sample surface with visual and force feedback in real-time without modifying its surface.
    - The nanomanipulation mode allows the operator to modify a region of interest in a more intuitive way because of force feedback (not blindly) and stylus joystick (not keyboard/mouse). Also it reduces the time of the experiment because it graphs quickly the modified region of interest after the manipulation (quick change between exploration mode and nanomanipulation mode).

    CHC includes many configuration options for the characterizacion of samples. Its modular design allows future expansions (force spectroscopy mode with force map, adaptation to other AFM probes, etc.) and can be adapted to other AFM and haptic devices.

    AFM model: Cervantes Fullmode AFM System, manufactured by Nanotec Electrónica.
    Haptic devices: Phantom Desktop and Omni Phantom, manufactured by Geomagic.

    # vimeo.com/77960971 Uploaded 39 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Nanomanipulation using an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an application with lots of potential and expectations in the area of nanotechnology, because it allows to create and manipulate structures at the atomic level.
    But nanomanipulation has limitations: it takes long time and is unintuitive. These limitations are due to mechanical manipulations are done with the tip of the AFM probe, and this probe can't be used to image and manipulate simultaneously. Therefore the nanomanipulation process is performed blindly; without real-time visual feedback. For this reason a nanomanipulation is a slow process that takes a reference image. performs a manipulation based on this image and then takes an image again to validate the manipulation. The lack of intuitiveness is due to commercial AFMs provide only keyboard and mouse nanomanipulation control, as well.
    The Cervantes Haptic Control application (CHC) allows to control an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using an haptic device (stylus type) and provides three operation modes (with GUI): training, exploration and nanomanipulation.
    - The training mode allows the operator to load and AFM image and become familiar with the haptic control, the sample surface and train the nanomanipulation procedure.
    - The exploration mode allows the operator to trace out the sample surface with visual and force feedback in real-time without modifying its surface.
    - The nanomanipulation mode allows the operator to modify a region of interest in a more intuitive way because of force feedback (not blindly) and stylus joystick (not keyboard/mouse). Also it reduces the time of the experiment because it graphs quickly the modified region of interest after the manipulation (quick change between exploration mode and nanomanipulation mode).
    CHC includes many configuration options for the characterizacion of samples. Its modular design allows future expansions (force spectroscopy mode with force map, adaptation to other AFM probes, etc.) and can be adapted to other AFM and haptic devices.
    AFM model: Cervantes Fullmode AFM System, manufactured by Nanotec Electrónica.
    Haptic devices: Phantom Desktop and Omni Phantom, manufactured by Geomagic.

    # vimeo.com/79307098 Uploaded 120 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Nanomanipulation using an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an application with lots of potential and expectations in the area of nanotechnology, because it allows to create and manipulate structures at the atomic level.
    But nanomanipulation has limitations: it takes long time and is unintuitive. These limitations are due to mechanical manipulations are done with the tip of the AFM probe, and this probe can't be used to image and manipulate simultaneously. Therefore the nanomanipulation process is performed blindly; without real-time visual feedback. For this reason a nanomanipulation is a slow process that takes a reference image. performs a manipulation based on this image and then takes an image again to validate the manipulation. The lack of intuitiveness is due to commercial AFMs provide only keyboard and mouse nanomanipulation control, as well.
    The Cervantes Haptic Control application (CHC) allows to control an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using an haptic device (stylus type) and provides three operation modes (with GUI): training, exploration and nanomanipulation.
    - The training mode allows the operator to load and AFM image and become familiar with the haptic control, the sample surface and train the nanomanipulation procedure.
    - The exploration mode allows the operator to trace out the sample surface with visual and force feedback in real-time without modifying its surface.
    - The nanomanipulation mode allows the operator to modify a region of interest in a more intuitive way because of force feedback (not blindly) and stylus joystick (not keyboard/mouse). Also it reduces the time of the experiment because it graphs quickly the modified region of interest after the manipulation (quick change between exploration mode and nanomanipulation mode).
    CHC includes many configuration options for the characterizacion of samples. Its modular design allows future expansions (force spectroscopy mode with force map, adaptation to other AFM probes, etc.) and can be adapted to other AFM and haptic devices.
    AFM model: Cervantes Fullmode AFM System, manufactured by Nanotec Electrónica.
    Haptic devices: Phantom Desktop and Omni Phantom, manufactured by Geomagic.

    # vimeo.com/79669602 Uploaded 55 Plays 0 Comments

CHC application

Victor Navascues

CHC allows nanomanipulation with AFM using an haptic device

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