1. On June 7, 2011 the Sun unleashed an M-2 (medium-sized) solar flare with a spectacular coronal mass ejection (CME). The large cloud of particles mushroomed up and fell back down looking as if it covered an area almost half the solar surface.

    SDO observed the flare's peak at 1:41 AM ET. SDO recorded these images in extreme ultraviolet light that show a very large eruption of cool gas. It is somewhat unique because at many places in the eruption there seems to be even cooler material -- at temperatures less than 80,000 K.

    This video uses the full-resolution 4096 x 4096 pixel images at a one minute time cadence to provide the highest quality, finest detail version possible.

    It is interesting to compare the event in different wavelengths because they each see different temperatures of plasma.

    Credit: NASA SDO / Goddard Space Flight Center

    More information at http://sunspotwatch.com/

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    # vimeo.com/80135285 Uploaded 101 Plays 0 Comments
  2. The sun's greatest hits as captured by the Solar Dynamic Observatory from February 2012 to February 2013.

    Live data and other resources can be found at http://SunSpotWatch.com

    On Feb. 11, 2010, NASA launched an unprecedented solar observatory into space. The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) flew up on an Atlas V rocket, carrying instruments that scientists hoped would revolutionize observations of the sun. If all went according to plan, SDO would provide incredibly high-resolution data of the entire solar disk almost as quickly as once a second.

    When the science team released its first images in April of 2010, SDO's data exceeded everyone's hopes and expectations, providing stunningly detailed views of the sun. In the three years since then, SDO's images have continued to show breathtaking pictures and movies of eruptive events on the sun. Such imagery is more than just pretty, they are the very data that scientists study. By highlighting different wavelengths of light, scientists can track how material on the sun moves. Such movement, in turn, holds clues as to what causes these giant explosions, which, when Earth-directed, can disrupt technology in space.

    SDO is the first mission in a NASA's Living With a Star program, the goal of which is to develop the scientific understanding necessary to address those aspects of the sun-Earth system that directly affect our lives and society. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. built, operates, and manages the SDO spacecraft for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington, D.C.

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    - Tomas / Amateur Radio Operator, NW7US ( http://NW7US.us )

    SDO Year 3 Visuals List: All of the information about the clips used may be found here: http://g.nw7us.us/HSv53B

    # vimeo.com/79581421 Uploaded 522 Plays 1 Comment
  3. A movie showing the M3.2 (some have it as an M2.6 magnitude) X-ray flare from Active Sunspot Region 1402. The flare peaked at 1608 UTC on 19 January 2012. The flare was associated with a Type IV radio
    sweep and a full-halo coronal mass ejection (CME) (estimated plane-of-sky speed 1100 km/s)

    The movie includes a number of different wavelengths, and then ends with the LASCO C2 capture of the CME which was released by the flare.

    X-ray flares are huge explosive releases of energy, including X-ray and light energy. This light and X-ray energy reaches Earth at the speed of light--eight minutes later. When it reaches Earth, it causes the ionosphere to become highly energized, so much so that the D-region (the lowest region) absorbs shortwave, and medium wave, frequencies, blocking them from going any further (and being refracted or propagated long distances around the world).

    As can be seen in the last segment of the movie, LASCO C2 captured the eruption of a coronal mass ejection. It appears that this CME was Earth-directed. It takes days for this to reach the Earth. Current forecasts have it to arrive on January 21, 2012 at approximately 2230 UTC (give or take 7 hours; it has over 90 million miles to journey).

    Credit: NASA SDO / Goddard Space Flight Center

    Please visit my website for more information at

    http://sunspotwatch.com/

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    # vimeo.com/79503053 Uploaded 33 Plays 0 Comments
  4. On 23 January 2012, a magnitude M8.7 (M9-class) X-ray flare erupted in NOAA Active Sunspot Region (AR) 1402. The long-duration flare peaked at 0359 UTC. This flare triggered a proton event, resulting in an S3 (Strong) Radiation (Proton) Storm and a Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) event over the polar regions.

    This PCA event caused a complete radio blackout over high-latitude and polar regions. This results in any trans-polar radio paths to become as dead as a rock.

    This solar proton radiation storm is the strongest since September, 2005, which was during the last solar sunspot cycle, Solar Cycle 23. An S3-level radiation storm causes airlines to divert air traffic away from the polar regions. This level of a storm could also cause satellite issues, with GPS and communications being affected. Additionally, those living and working in polar regions must take precautions not to be exposed to this radiation.

    At the end of the video, you will see the Coronal Mass Ejection that was released by this flare. This is a fast-moving CME and it is expected to arrive at Earth on January 24, 2012, triggering a G1 to G3 level geomagnetic storm.

    X-ray flares are huge explosive releases of energy, including X-ray and light energy. This light and X-ray energy reaches Earth at the speed of light--eight minutes later. When it reaches Earth, it causes the ionosphere to become highly energized, so much so that the D-region (the lowest region) absorbs shortwave, and medium wave, frequencies, blocking them from going any further (and being refracted or propagated long distances around the world).

    Credit: NASA SDO / AIA / LASCO / STEREO

    ( Guide to X-ray Flare classifications; what is an X-class, M-class or other-class flare: http://g.nw7us.us/18AjAEO )

    Please visit my website for more information at

    http://sunspotwatch.com/

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    # vimeo.com/79490405 Uploaded 25 Plays 0 Comments
  5. A strong solar flare of class M5.0 occurred around 1332 UT (time of maximum) on the sunspot 1745, in the west of the Sun. A CME (coronal mass ejection) was projected into space and is clearly visible in the images of spacecraft SOHO. If directed Earthward (we will know, soon), the CME will trigger aurora and geomagnetic activity.

    In a brief, simple explanation (I hope), this event (which is complex, actually, in that there are several individual events that make up this single display of an active Sun), is one in which we see complex magnetic structures originating from within the Sun, snapping apart, causing a powerful expulsion of solar material and an explosion of a great magnitude of power in the form of light, radio energy, and so on. The light and radio energy reaches Earth in about eight minutes, and is mostly absorbed and blocked by the upper atmosphere, and affects the Ionosphere, such that shortwave radio radio waves are blocked. This blockage is known as a radio blackout, and it affects only the daylight side of the Earth. It does not affect VHF and higher frequencies, such as TV and cellphones. At the same time, this expulsion of solar material, solar plasma, is sometimes directed Earthward, and if so, takes about two days to make its way to the Earth. The arrival interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere and geomagnetic field. This may cause geomagnetic storms, which in turn may trigger aurora, and further degradation of shortwave radio propagation. In the worst case, the geomagnetic activity could cause power line and pipeline damage, but it takes a very large geomagnetic storm to cause that sort of damage. This event is not producing such a powerful event.

    This video is from NASA, and were taken from the AIA instrument of the satellite SDO (Solar Dynamic Observatory), with a wavelength of 304 + 131 Angstroms.

    Credit: SDO AIA

    More info: http://SunSpotWatch.com

    # vimeo.com/79456131 Uploaded 52 Plays 0 Comments

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