1. Trish Sherman, with Dykeman Inc., will highlight the rain harvesting system at Valley View Middle School in the Snohomish School District. All of the rain that falls on the roof of the school is captured in 32 large cisterns allowing the school to not only slow down stormwater events, but flush all of the toilets in the building using captured rain instead of treated drinking water saving about $2,500 a year in water bills for the school district.

    To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks

    BIO: Trish Sherman, with Dykeman since 1991, has an extensive project portfolio that includes K-12 schools and commercial projects in Washington and Alaska. While she has worked on a wide variety of projects including retail, commercial, and residential, she is the most enthusiastic about her work on schools. She is passionate about the impact Dykeman makes on student learning and is continually researching sustainable strategies to improve the learning environment.

    Links for Learning More…
    • About the work of Dykeman Inc. dykeman.net/
    • City of Seattle Rain Water Harvesting webpage: seattle.gov/util/EnvironmentConservation/MyLawnGarden/Rain_Water_Harvesting/index.htm
    • Capturing Rainwater from Rooftops – Policy Planning Guidelines from the Natural Resources Defense Council: nrdc.org/water/files/rooftoprainwatercapture.pdf
    • Rainwater Harvesting for Beneficial Use Tip #520 for builders from the Seattle Department of Planning and Development: seattle.gov/DPD/Publications/CAM/CAM520.pdf
    • Seattle Rain Barrel Users Guide: seattle.gov/util/cs/groups/public/@spu/@conservation/documents/webcontent/cos_004351.pdf
    • Average monthly precipitation rates based on the Seattle area: seattle.gov/living-in-seattle/environment/weather/averages-and-records

    # vimeo.com/129475429 Uploaded 75 Plays 0 Comments
  2. David McDonald, with Seattle Public Utilities, describes the journey of yard waste and food waste to a state of the art composting facility and back to the soil in our flower beds, shrubs, lawns, rain gardens and bioswales. Shows how building healthy soil reduces the need for synthetic fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides on lawns and gardens, and the benefits of natural yard care through building soil health with regular application of compost.

    To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks

    BIO: David McDonald is a biologist and environmental scientist with Seattle Public Utilities, focusing on soil science and environmentally friendly landscape design and development practices. He leads the Washington Organic Recycling Council’s “Soils for Salmon” initiative, which is transforming development practices around the Northwest, and serves on the technical core committees of the national Sustainable Sites Initiative, and Washington’s ecoPRO Sustainable Landscape Professional Certification program. David has worked in oceanographic research, mountain lion research and forest fire management, operated a small farm, and taught agriculture and forestry with the Peace Corps.

    Links for Learning More…
    • Composting and natural yard care GardenHotline.org
    • Soil best practices for stormwater management SoilsforSalmon.org or BuildingSoil.org
    • Soil Biology Primer nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/soils/health/biology
    • Soil solutions to climate change: NW Bio-carbon Initiative climatesolutions.org/programs/nbi
    • Washington soils, soil testing, composting: soils.puyallup.wsu.edu/soils

    # vimeo.com/129465164 Uploaded 137 Plays 0 Comments
  3. James Ricks, Student Sustainability Ambassador from Liberty High School, presents a case study from the City of Newcastle outlining the city’s legal obligation to reduce the impacts of polluted stormwater runoff, including the collection of stormwater fees from property owners and the services provided. Includes an overview of the NPDES Permit process, city policy and planning frameworks, the installation and maintenance of stormwater infrastructure, low impact development code innovations, and what every citizen can do to help reduce polluted stormwater runoff.

    To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks

    BIO: James is a Junior at Liberty High School in the Issaquah School District and a member of the Sustainability Ambassadors. He joined the Sustainability Ambassadors near the middle of his Freshman year at Liberty. Since joining the Ambassadors, James has learned to analyze sustainability trends and how to communicate them. His work with the program also led him to partner with his city government to start a Youth Advisory Board in Newcastle. You can often find James hiking the forest trails near Cougar Mt, or on his bike, meandering about the many roads and byways near his house. He also runs cross country and track in school.

    Links for Learning More:
    • City of Newcastle's Storwater Education webpage: ci.newcastle.wa.us/public_works/StormwaterEducation.htm
    • US EPA on Stormwater: water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/stormwater/index.cfm
    • Videos on Stormwater Pollutions Solutions: sustainabilityambassadors.org/apps/videos/channels/show/4083829-stormwater-pollution-solutions
    • Low Impact Development Manual for Schools: sustainabilityambassadors.org/lid-manual-for-schools
    • 20 Actions projects to reduce stormwater pollution: sustainabilityambassadors.org/20-action-projects

    # vimeo.com/128342627 Uploaded 64 Plays 0 Comments
  4. Kristine Cramer, Community Relations Planner, with the King County Wastewater Treatment Division, describes how two-thirds of Seattle is served by a combined sewer system designed to carry sewage from inside homes and stormwater runoff from streets, rooftops, and parking lots in a single “combined sewer” pipe. During dry weather, all raw sewage flows to the treatment plant. When it rains, the pipes can become overloaded with polluted stormwater. This mixture of stormwater (about 90%) and raw sewage can overflow into lakes, streams, and the Puget Sound. Because of these impacts to water quality, the federal Clean Water Act and state regulations require that we take action and reduce overflows to an average of no more than one per outfall per year. How are King County and Seattle collaborating to meet this challenge?

    To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks

    BIO: Kristine Cramer works as a Community Relations Planner for King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division. King County’s goal of being a good neighbor is realized through the work of people like Kristine who engage directly with interested neighbors and other stakeholders to ensure that needed wastewater system improvements also work for the neighborhoods in which they are placed. Kristine’s favorite projects use green stormwater infrastructure to remove stormwater from the sewer system before it becomes a problem. Prior to joining King County, Kristine worked for 15 years as an educator at outdoor schools and later developing and implementing sustainability curriculum that focused on encouraging environmentally responsible behaviors in people of all ages.

    Links for Learning More…
    • Natural drainage solutions to protect our waters - kingcounty.gov/environment/wastewater/CSO/Solutions/Green.aspx
    • RainWise - rainwise.seattle.gov/city/seattle/overview
    • King County’s RainWise homepage - kingcounty.gov/environment/wastewater/CSO/BeRainwise.aspx
    • Barton CSO Control project - kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Construction/Seattle/BartonCSO-GSI.aspx
    • King County and Seattle Joint Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program – 700milliongallons.org – will be live May 2015

    # vimeo.com/128330947 Uploaded 378 Plays 0 Comments
  5. Greg Giraldo PE, from SvR Design Company, explains the relationship between stormwater management design and creating a sense of environmental identity and stewardship at a variety of neighborhood scales. Greg will reveal how stormwater is integrated into community spaces, providing important ecological and interpretive value. From a single block in downtown Seattle to 700 acres of urban sprawl, Greg investigates the role stormwater plays in design, how it can be expressed and celebrated and what we might learn from valuing this vital resource.

    To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks

    BIO: Greg Giraldo, specializing in civil engineering and sustainable systems, brings seventeen years of experience in weaving green infrastructure into the design of community spaces. Greg takes design inspiration from our own ecosystems, biomimicry, and human patterns to give infrastructure design a purpose and place within the landscape. For the past fourteen years, Greg has been working with landscape architects and civil engineers at SvR Design Company, directing design on a number of high profile low impact development projects. His expertise includes green buildings, advanced natural drainage systems, rainwater harvesting and wetland treatment systems for wastewater. Greg is one of the founders of the University of Washington’s Green Stormwater Infrastructure Professional Certificate program, an Instructor for the Washington Department of Ecology Low Impact Development Trainings and recently co-authored The Business Guide to Sustainability - Practical Strategies and Tools for Organizations, 3rd Edition.

    Links for Learning More…
    • SvR Design Company: svrdesign.com/
    • UW GSI Certificate Program: pce.uw.edu/courses/implementing-evaluating-infrastructure-projects/downtown-seattle-summer-2015/
    • WA Ecology LID Trainings: ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/stormwater/municipal/LID/TRAINING/index.html
    • Business Guide to Sustainability: routledge.com/books/details/9781138786189/

    # vimeo.com/128203771 Uploaded 159 Plays 0 Comments

SustainabilityTALKS

Sustainability Ambassadors Plus

Crisp, professional talks no longer than 10 minutes.

Bringing the community to the classroom, SustainabilityTALKS are given by field experts plus exceptional student speakers on a new topic each year. Designed to inspire and inform learning from middle…


+ More

Crisp, professional talks no longer than 10 minutes.

Bringing the community to the classroom, SustainabilityTALKS are given by field experts plus exceptional student speakers on a new topic each year. Designed to inspire and inform learning from middle school to graduate school.

Teachers from civics to science to literacy use these TALKS to kick off a unit of study, reinforce key concepts, or assess student literacy. Each video is supported by resource links selected by the speaker.

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