Josh Ewing began visiting the Bears Ears region of southeastern Utah to climb at Indian Creek and explore the local archaeology. But when he moved to the town of Bluff, he saw degradation from oil drilling, looting, and careless visitors. Ewing knew simply loving a place was no longer enough.

Get Involved: Protect Bears Ears in southeastern Utah.

Sign the Petition at: bearsearscoalition.org/action/

Published

The New Localism

We are all locals. We can no longer pass through or visit remote, wild places and trust they will remain that way. Friends of Patagonia have always brought us news of places they loved that are threatened — and Patagonia is committed to bringing our resources…


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We are all locals. We can no longer pass through or visit remote, wild places and trust they will remain that way. Friends of Patagonia have always brought us news of places they loved that are threatened — and Patagonia is committed to bringing our resources and connections to bear on these threats to wildness, far and wide. We all have a chance to make a difference. Take a stand. This is the New Localism.

About

Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis. See…


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Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis. See what we do at patagonia.com

20 Comments

Dave Katz

Dave Katz Plus

Love the timelapse at 3:28, super impressive aerial shot at 4:50 and great TL again at 4:56. Overall I really like how the piece covers the story of the conservation and also weaves in rad climbing footage. Strong work Fitz, Mikey, stoked for you all!

Polina Rabtseva

Polina Rabtseva

amazingly shot, great idea, I would love to be involved with your next projects

Soxiam

Soxiam Staff

Thanks Patagonia. Nothing but absolutely inspiring and thought provoking stories as always.

Cloudy Ridge Productions

Cloudy Ridge Productions PRO

A well-produced and beautiful film. All well and good. Friends of Cedar Mesa is a decent group with worthy intentions. Unfortunately the pertinent issue of preserving and caring for that vast and sacred land in danger of ruin on so many levels, plays second chair to pimping out a delicate ridge north of Bluff, Utah to the future climbing hordes about to descend upon it. A suggestion and compromise: Close off all climbing and bicycle access south of SR-95 and north of SR-191 along this ridge and along the adjacent Wash east of said Ridge. Leave it alone damnit! You can have your crags north of SR-95. Build a parking lot Wal-Mart will be proud of near Arch Canyon complete with camping and toilet facilities, hideous trails up to the routes, guide books, etc., etc. You have set a serious consequence in motion that cannot be undone: The hordes will arrive thanks to this film. I will not sign your petition. This Patagonia-sponsored film is hypocritical to say the least. Open your eyes. Please.

Damian Fankhauser

Damian Fankhauser Plus

Wow - I'm Speaches!
Coming from Switzerland & Groningen Up climbing a something "normal", this Story makes me rethink And motivates me Big time Slowinzischen MY some bot only climbing but also Skill, Diving, fighting for a cause And Protect Even Small Reserven in Europe!
Thanks for Operning my eyes!
Damian from Bern / Capital of Switzerland...

Damian Fankhauser

Damian Fankhauser Plus

Not happy about my "autocorrected" mistakes... But motivated Tenfold To Show my son more of skills I was thought Growing Up on the countryside!

Jenna

Jenna

All Planet Earth needs protection now .... Jenna

Dave H

Dave H

Love the message and the dedication of one man to start a program to help preserve fragile ruins of such an interesting culture. But, just for fun imagine him holding an empty gas can for the first 35 seconds of the film.

Stephen Partington

Stephen Partington

Great script, camera, subject. All the Patagonia films I've seen are exceptionally good.

maboufavor

maboufavor

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Ryan

Ryan

I don't think that oil and gas drilling means destroying the cliffs, ruins, and artifacts. In fact any development project has a lot of pre-planning (EIA and EIS) to avoid archeological, geological, biological, and paleontological impact. Surely there could be an agreement when drilling would not occur in sensitive areas and access to most of your climbing could be allowed by upgraded and restricted paths and parking. Pump jacks have a small footprint. 12 hour drives from SLC have a footprint too. We climbers need to show respect to get respect, not just always claim to live on the fringe of society. Great video. I appreciate your cause to raise awareness and compromise. I think we have a responsibility to support some aspects of our society. If not here, then where do we send the US military to destroy places were there might be good climbing.

Choon Oh

Choon Oh

Marvelous, amazing video. Also inspiring as well.

Hanna Utkin

Hanna Utkin

'just loving a place isn't enough, you got to have a willingness to protect it' (Y)

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