1. Tony Pacini playing an original composition "Virgo" from his suite "13 Signs". Piano: Bosendorfer 280 Vienna Concert Grand. Lenses: Zeiss Classic Lenses, manual Focus. Location: Classic Pianos of Portland.

    # vimeo.com/264525244 Uploaded
  2. I particularly enjoy to film Tony in the recital room at Classic Pianos of Portland. The setting and lighting, are very conducive to creating very moody videos. I also appreciate when Tony plays a Bosendorfer. Here he playes a marvelous sounding Bosendorfer 280 Vienna Concert Grand. Tony is particularly fond of the power, and nuances of Bosendorfer pianos and he loves them.

    Here are some words from Tony on the song, the piano, and some music theory explaining the chord progressions of Black Coffee:
    "A little known fact, "Black Coffee" is actually based on the chord progression of a composition by Mary Lou Williams; "What's Your Story Morning Glory". Coincidentally, during this session Ciro and I also filmed a movement from my suite, "13 Signs", titled "Virgo" which is a similar collective work to Mary Lou William's "Zodiac Suite". You'll find it for further viewing on this channel. Regarding the style and interpretation of "Black Coffee", the fine tonal essence of a quality piano like a Bosendorfer lends itself to harmonically rich left hand playing. Playing jazz piano used to include a pianist's ability to play stride piano, and walking tenths in the left hand. At times I feel that this pianistic approach is often over-looked, or even ignored by jazz pianists in the modern era. When walking tenths with the left hand as a bass line (harmonized), if the pianist has the physical reach, it is possible to create diminished tenths. This adds a color of harmony reminiscent of the early jazz piano masters like Art Tatum, Teddy Wilson and Oscar Peterson".

    # vimeo.com/264378918 Uploaded
  3. Walt Disney introduced "Someday My Prince Will Come" to the world in 1937. Although it was used within a second movie in 1948, it wasn't until 1957 that pianist Dave Brubeck recorded a jazz version. Later, in 1961, Miles Davis recorded a popular version of the tune in the key of B Flat. Since then, jazz players abroad have recorded it countless times. Here, Tony plays an exclusive solo video version, mostly in the key of D Flat (as well as a few other keys). Enjoy.

    # vimeo.com/262338432 Uploaded
  4. "Dark Matter" A composition by Tony Pacini, showcasing the Bosendorfer Imperial Concert Grand's impressive 9 foot bass strings. Pacini leaves orbit in the key of Ab minor with some free improv.

    # vimeo.com/262328169 Uploaded
  5. A note from Tony: Sometimes Springtime in the Pacific Northwest feels like Autumn, and the storms keep rolling in. There is a safe passage however; jazz music, and it's withstood many storms. The vessel I'm sailing within the video is a Bosendorfer Imperial Concert Grand, and "Grand She Is" - courtesy of Classic Piano's Portland.

    # vimeo.com/261787381 Uploaded

Tony Pacini

Ciro Fusco Plus

Tony Pacini - jazz pianist.

The Tony Pacini Trio: Tim Rap-drums, Ed Bennet-bass, Tony Pacini-piano.

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Shout Box

  • Ciro Fusco

    Tony Pacini-piano, Ed Bennett-bass, Tim Rap-drums.

    The caliber of musicianship and mastery of jazz form are apparent to the listener. The players demonstrate strong personal styles crafted through years of study, stage and studio performance and respect for the jazz tradition.

    On The Piano: Born in Tokyo, Japan pianist Tony Pacini came to Portland, Oregon as an infant. A piano student since age 5, Tony led his first trio as a teenager, holding down weekends at a popular jazz spot. The piano made higher education possible for Tony, including study at Boston's Berklee College Of Music, courtesy of a Leonard Feather scholarship.

    Once back in Portland, Tony immersed himself in the jazz scene performing with, most notably: Leroy Vinnegar, Bud Shank, Harry Allen, Ritchie Cole, Chuck Israels, Dan Faehnle, Mary Stallings, Hadley Calliman, Mel Brown, Ron Steen, Nancy King and Rebecca Kilgore. Tony's playing won him the piano chair in guitarist Dan Faehnle's Quartet, joining bassist Ed Bennett and drummer Mel Brown. After several years of working together, Tony and Ed enlisted drummer Tim Rap, and their shared musical vision was realized with the creation of the Tony Pacini Trio.

    On The Drums: Tim credits Billy Higgins' philosophy - to play what the music calls for, no more no less, with shaping his thoughtful approach to the role of the drums in jazz. Tim's exceptional talent caught the ear of guitarist John Stowell, leading to performances with world class vocalists Nancy King, Shirley Nanette and jazz guitar icon Herb Ellis.

    On The Bass: Long considered one of the West coast's first rate string bass players, Ed stepped onto the world stage in the 1970's, touring with jazz great Carmen McRae. Three recordings were produced during Ed's work with Carmen most notably the Grammy nominated "Live At The Great American Music Hall" on Blue Note Records, which also featured Joey Baron, Marshall Otwell and jazz giant Dizzy Gillespie.

    by Ciro Fusco

  • Ciro Fusco

    More at: tonypacini.com

    by Ciro Fusco

  • Ciro Fusco

    The jazz piano artistry of Tony Pacini has been enthusiastically enjoyed by nightclub and festival audiences throughout the West coast as well as in his hometown of Portland, Oregon.

    Born in Tokyo, Japan (May, 1970), while his father, (a consummate musician) was on the road at the time; pianist Tony Pacini came to Portland, Oregon as an infant. Tony's exposure to music began at an early age, having the added benefits of growing up in a musical family including three uncles, two aunts and a father all of whom were experienced musicians. A piano student since age 5, Tony led his first trio as a teenager, holding down weekends at a popular jazz spot.

    The piano made higher education possible for Tony, including study at Boston's prestigious Berklee College Of Music, courtesy of a all-tuition paid scholarship from jazz critic Leonard Feather.

    Upon returning to Portland Tony immersed himself in the jazz scene performing with, most notably: Leroy Vinnegar, Antonio Hart, Bill Henderson, Bud Shank, Benny Golson, Byron Stripling, Carl Sanders, Chuck Israels, Chuck Redd, Claudio Roditi, Curtis Fuller, Dan Faehnle, Hadley Calliman, Harry Allen, Marlena Shaw, Mary Stallings, Mel Brown, Ritchie Cole, Ron Steen, Nancy King and Rebecca Kilgore.

    by Ciro Fusco

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