Virtual Alaska Weather Symposia

  1. Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 11:00 AM AKST
    Speaking:
    Dave Snider, National Weather Service
    Complicated ideas and scientific data are often hard to understand for public or community partners. Reframing your information to serve your audience is the first step in managing your message.

    Dave Snider is the Alaska Weather TV Desk program leader for the National Weather Service Alaska Region at the Anchorage Weather Forecast Office. Dave has over 20 years of broadcast television and graphics experience in Alaska, Colorado, North Carolina, and Missouri. He's earned an Emmy and other awards for covering crippling Front Range blizzards, hurricanes, and tornado outbreaks up to the Joplin tornado in 2011. Now, Dave's using those experiences and tools to help Alaska's citizens and partners receive and understand the National Weather Service weather and preparedness message through social media and the Alaska Weather TV Show. Dave is a father of two boys, a husband and grew up in Saint Louis.

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  2. Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 12:00 PM AKDT
    Speaking:
    Michael Folmer Satellite Liaison at NOAA
    PLEASE NOTE START TIME CHANGE FROM ORINGAL 11AM TO 12PM

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) was added to the Satellite Proving Ground for Marine, Precipitation, and Satellite Analysis in late 2012, just in time to introduce forecasters to the very high-resolution imagery available from the Suomi-National Polar Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument when observing and forecasting Hurricane Sandy (2012). Since that time, more polar products have been introduced to the forecast routines at the National Weather Service (NWS) Ocean Prediction Center (OPC), Weather Prediction Center (WPC), Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB) of the National Hurricane Center (NHC), and the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) of the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS). These new data sets have led to research projects at the OPC and TAFB that have specifically been looking into the early identification of stratospheric intrusions that lead to explosive cyclogenesis or extratropical transition of tropical cyclones.

    Currently NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) temperature and moisture soundings are available in AWIPS-II as a point-based display. Traditionally soundings are used to anticipate and forecast severe convection, however unique and valuable information can be gained from soundings for other forecasting applications, such as extratropical transition, especially in data sparse regions. Additional research has been conducted to look at how JPSS CrIS/ATMS NUCAPS soundings might help forecasters identify the pre-extratropical transition or pre-explosive cyclogenesis environments, leading to earlier diagnosis and better public advisories. CrIS/ATMS NUCAPS soundings, IASI and NUCAPS ozone products, NOAA G-IV GPS dropwindsondes, the Air Mass RGB, and single water vapor channels have been analyzed to look for the precursors to these high impact events. This presentation seeks to show some early analysis and potential uses of the polar-orbiting datasets to compliment the geostationary imagery and therefore lead to earlier identification and possible warnings.

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  3. Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 11:00 AM AKDT
    Speaking:
    Heather Reeves, Research Associate (CIMMS/NSSL)
    In this talk, several issues related to surface hydrometeor classification are discussed. These include uncertainty in the observations, algorithms used to deduce the precipitation type from numerical weather prediction models, and the uncertainty in the models themselves. One of these issues, the uncertainty in the algorithms is addressed by reinventing the way hydrometeor classification is performed in NWP models. This new classifier is referred to as the Spectral Bin Classifier (SBC). Its design and performance metrics will be presented.

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  4. Wednesday, August 23, 2017 at 11:00 AM AKDT
    Speaking:
    Trevor Alcott (NOAA) & Jiang Zhu (GINA/UAF)

    DATE CHANGE - The date for this webinar was changed from August 16 to August 23 due to a scheduling conflict.

    The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Alaska model (HRRR-AK) is a new weather forecast model that uses a specially configured version of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model to predict atmospheric and surface conditions over all of Alaska, at 3-km grid spacing, out to 36 hours. HRRR-AK is cycled every 3 hours at NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), assimilating many novel and conventional observations to produce a “best” initial atmospheric state, and benefiting from recent improvements to the existing contiguous-US HRRR physics suite. However, Alaska lies at the functional fringe of geostationary satellite coverage and is notorious for a scarcity of conventional surface observations. To address this issue, ESRL has partnered with the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) group at University of Alaska Fairbanks to explore the effective use of polar orbiting satellite data. This talk will cover the current configuration of HRRR-AK, known strengths and weaknesses, and ongoing work at GINA toward assimilating new satellite datasets for improved HRRR-AK forecasts.

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  5. Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 11:00 AM AKDT
    Speaking:
    Brian Brettschneider, University of Alaska Fairbanks
    Many places have a local saying that reads, “if you don’t like the weather, wait 15 minutes.” This idiom is not as applicable to Alaska, where strong seasonality is an ever present fact of life. In December, January, and February, all of Mainland Alaska has snow on the ground and experiences sub-freezing temperatures. In June, July, and August, long days mean warm temperatures, clouds, rain, and mosquitoes. Within those seasons, large variation exists from one year to the next. Winter 2016-17 is much colder and snowier than either of the previous two winters. Those differences are meaningful in the cold season for activities that involve travel on frozen rivers and shorefast ice, following game tracks in snow, meat and fish storage, and more. In summer, year-to-year differences in climate affect fish runs, berry production, river runoff, and fire activity.

    An IARC project with John Walsh and Rick Thoman, Brettschneider uses an analog technique to forecast seasonal conditions based on previous months’ conditions. If conditions over a 1, 2, 3, or more month time period are similar to some other year, then highlighting that match year is useful for determining what the current year’s conditions will resemble 1, 2, 3, or more months in the future. For example, a forecast for June temperatures based on the three years with the best global 500 mb geopotential height match to October-December 2016 in the northern hemisphere indicate near normal temperatures for most of the state with slightly below normal temperatures for the eastern interior. This type of pattern-match analog forecasting provides long lead-time indications for seasonal conditions.

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Virtual Alaska Weather Symposia

IARC Group Plus

This partnership between the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) and the NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) brings cutting edge satellite based presentations to a broad audience and complements GINA’s and NWS’s deep pool of speakers and topics.

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