CJ

CJ

I Like both these cameras for different reasons, but the 7d is on the expensive side and i feel like if i get the 550d i will just have to upgrade to the 7d in a year anyway so i feel like its a waste of money. Can some one please help.

Attila Nemeth

Attila Nemeth

550D and spend the rest on quality lenses. Even if you are upgrading later to the 7D or it's predecessor, they will be gold.

CJ

CJ

thank you i think thats what im gonna do

Robert

Robert

Check out the Panasonic GH1. I considered the 550D but decided on the GH1

CJ

CJ

ive looked at the gh1 but i am still a canon fan( because of past cameras) but thank you for the post.

Mark

Mark PRO

Go with the 550d. The 7D and 550d shoot identical video. The only reason to go for the 7D is if you also shoot a lot of stills. I say don't even bother with the GH1.

Lucas

Lucas Plus

The 550D and 7D video capabilities are VERY similar (I can't tell the difference). The 7D takes better still photos. The 7D has a slightly different physical user interface (seems more user friendly). The 7D is weather resistant. The 7D is more of a "pro" camera, so it feels better/stronger/less-plasticy than the 550D. But all that being said… the 550D was good enough for me so I bought it, and it left me with some extra money for lenses and other equipment.

Jon Bryant

Jon Bryant Plus

6 months ago when I was looking at DSLRs I had the same question, but it was 7d vs 5d mkII - and there was a big price difference and the 7d had 24p. The lower price and 24p meant I went with the 7d.

Now the 550D is out. If you are only going to use this camera for video then the 550D is the best value. The 7d has a pro body, so it is weather proof. The 7d's interface is also "pro" so intuitive to use. They both have APS-C sensors, so that should get you thinking long and hard about lens choices.
If you plan at any point in looking at doing timelapses you need to seriously consider the 7d despite it costing more.

My advice would be to watch JJ's review: vimeo.com/9719790
He did a great job on this and has another review on overheating issues.

The one thing that you must consider when moving to a DSLR is the glass you need with it. Glass is expensive and you may find will cost you more than your body. I would research the glass you want for your films/projects first and factor that into your budget. Nothing worse than being stuck with a kit lens that's not fast or robust enough in low light or for shallow depth of field because it was within your budget.

Then be prepared for other accessories within your budget (at least a good external mic will be needed for audio).

Good luck.

CJ

CJ

Thank you all so much for the fast and extremely helpful feedback.(this is why i love vimeo)

alex k

alex k

Hey, CJ
I'm one of those "Canon guys", but I bought a GH1 because I need it for video. For stills I would've bought a Canon. And I would get a 550 and some good lens.
Bodies come and go, lenses are staying.
I stopped chasing new bodies after I bought a 40D, because this will never end.
If you take a good lens on a so-so body and a latest body with a crappy lens, the picture will be better with a good lens combination.
Good luck with the purchase !

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