Egg Media UK

Egg Media UK Plus

Hi all,

I have a 1280 x 720 project in Premiere pro since that was the size I filmed in and now want to author this to DVD.

What are the best settings to use when exporting in Premiere CS5? such as variable bit rate, which format? etc etc

Thanks in advance,

Jonty

matt wolfe [cc]

matt wolfe [cc] Plus

What software are you going to use to create the DVD? I think whatever you export it as, your DVD software is going to convert it anyway. I would just export it as is and see what the DVD burning software makes it look like. Different programs do things differently. I used an old Nero version for about a year and a half. For some reason if I used an uncompressed AVI (for SD) it always turned out looking lower quality than an MPEG2 (for SD). Weird. But it happens.

Perrone Ford

Perrone Ford

While I cannot help you with your CS5 settings, do note that DVDs have a max bitrate of about 9Mbps for audio and video signal combined. Many older players stutter when the rate is this high though, so in general I try to stay about about 8.2 Mbps max.

Also note that DVDs only understand MPEG2 and a very specific type of Mpeg2, so your options will be somewhat limited. Hopefully,CS5 has some very good method of downscaling from HD to SD, because CS4 certainly didn't, and neither do most other NLEs.

Best,

-P

Egg Media UK

Egg Media UK Plus

Thanks to both of you for your response.

Ok, I tried CS5's method of exporting to MPEG-2 DVD which is really good quality for SD but for some reason there's no audio in the rendered file. I selected to include audio but there's nothing.

Will this appear once burned to DVD?

Remember my project is 1280 x 720 25fps etc but as this is going on DVD it needs to be in SD.

As mister wolfe pointed out I could maybe render export it as it is (1280 x 720) and then see what the DVD burner does with it when converting. So could I render out my project from Premiere in a Lossless file or something and then burn or should I render out to MPEG-2 DVD (once i've found the audio problem)

Also can you guys recommend any good burning software that will do this well without much or any compression to my file. I want to preserve as much quality as possible. Preferably software that's free too as I don't burn DVD's that often.

thanks

J

Perrone Ford

Perrone Ford

This peculiarity seems to trip up a great many people who are not used to creating standard DVDs.

Here is the problem.

The international specification set forth for DVDs requires the audio to be compressed as either PCM, or AAC. These are the only two legal compression types. However, the only legal compression for the video is Mpeg2.

This disparity in requirements means that two seperate encodes are required. One for the audio and one for the video since the compression scheme required is not the same. A proper video encode will not include the audio.

As for the second question of DVD burning software, the CS5 suite already comes with an excellent piece of software for burning DVDs.

4Moorhens2

4Moorhens2

Perrone, did you mean AC-3 (Audio Codec 3) - perhaps "AAC" (Advanced Audio Codec) was a typo?

Perrone Ford

Perrone Ford

Yes, sorry. Thanks for that.

It was about 5AM when I wrote that! :)

(insomnia sucks)

4Moorhens2

4Moorhens2

I've suffered insomnia in the past when trying to burn DVD's with a pc: the last 15 minutes of a two hour film would often have lots of errors and be almost unplayable. Tried different makes of DVD disks without success, Device Manager said DVD Drive "is working properly" and DMA was ok....in the end I replaced the DVD drive and could burn DVD's without any problems...Windows!!! :(

4Moorhens2

4Moorhens2

Michael,

It was an IDE DVD drive in an old Fujitsu Siemens laptop and I replaced it with a Samsung drive.

Hasan Salame

Hasan Salame Plus

here is ur problem: (when exporting u can choose to separate Audio in a file and the video in another)
after video, go to multiplexing and chose DVD (not non) to merge audio/video in one file..

Details:

In the exporting options.. choose MPEG2 DVD

under: (according to 1280 x 720 project) u got to choose (Wide PAL progressive High quality) if ur region is PAL..or ( Wide NTSC progressive High quality) if NTSC

*wide because 1280x720 is 16x9 aspect ratio

for best video quality
then in video tab just set the quality to 5 (max) and the bitrate to CBR 8 not 9 (because it wouldn't burn on normal dvds.. so stick to CBR 8 (note: u can chose VBR 2 pass but CBR is better for sound sync)

now here is ur problem: (when exporting u can choose to separate Audio in a file and the video in another)
after video, go to multiplexing and chose DVD (not non) to merge audio/video in one file..

Egg Media UK

Egg Media UK Plus

Thanks for your response. This was helpful.

I have overcome this problem now but have a new one to solve.

I have a 1280 x 720 HD project that I wish to burn to Blue-Ray disc for me to watch on my HD TV.

Please can you kindly give specific settings to use in order to get the best results for burning to Blu-ray?

I chose the MPEG-2 Blu-ray template in premiere as I was exporting but there is something to do with GOP frames N frames and I'm not sure what I should set those to.

Also I noticed after my test blue-ray render the file looked like a document type which can't be opened with a video player. It's a file which I'm guessing needs to be burned to disc?

I think it was .M2v

what software can I use to burn blu-ray discs with?

and ONE last issue I had when I burned my M-PEG 2 regular DVD, when playing back on the TV everything looks great apart from a stutter every 2 seconds or so consistently throughout the video. It doesn't cut out or anything, it just jumps a frame or two every couple of seconds which doesn't make easy viewing.

It means that when the camera pans it looks like the cameraman has done a crap job of panning the camera when in reality it's the playback that makes the fluid movements look a little less steady.

any help would be appreciated, especially with advising me on how to burn Blu-ray succesfully.

Thanks in advance

Jonty

Hasan Salame

Hasan Salame Plus

Hello again,
first, I'm glad that it was helpful.. and that u understood my bad English :D
--------------
First, I think the stutter in the playback was caused during the transcoding stage. Meaning, before burning the DVD, if the burning software is not compatible with the video file extension, it needs to convert it again, even if it's MPEG or whatever.
-------------
so the best thing to do here is to use the most compatible software with premiere, which is 'Adobe Encore DVD.. needless to say, it's included in the master collection..
there is something wonderful in this software u can use it.. I think it started with cs4 and now I'm using in CS5;
You can import a sequence from Premiere to Encore with no need to export the video from premiere before.
Just go to Encore whatever your project is, HD, DV, Blue-ray...etc.. just import the project file .pproj and you'll be asked about the sequence you want to import.. when you choose the sequence to a Blu-ray or DVD Encore project it will be transcoded before the burning to the best video type, quality, and resolution.. it will be done according to the kind of the encore project..but you should read the tutorial carefully because you need to specify many things b4 burning as the 'first play' and the 'title menu' and many small things that would be confusing to you..

Anyways, just try and if you want any further information about how to use Encore I will be more that happy to help.
--------------------
M2V: dont worry about it.. it's just a video file to use during the post production and DVD Authoring.. it's a very known extension in the world of editing..
---------------
did I forget something??

let's see:...........about the GOP thingy..
-----------
don't worry.. if you don't wanna use the way I told you about (importing sequence to Encore) ; just export it using preset MPEG2-BLUE-RAY - MATCH PROJECT ATTRIBUTES..
and then go to Encore choose Blue-ray Project and import the resulting file as a timeline.. you're discover many great things using Encore.
-------------
one last thing, many people have suffered burning (blue-ray) and (DVD duel layer) using Encore in windows 7 and vista. In order to avoid this problem, just run Encore as administrator before opening the project. (right click-run as admin)
---------------
hope this helped

Hasan Salame

Hasan Salame Plus

one other thing: if u import a sequence to Encore it will import quickly as a shortcut but it will take some time to render before burning.

Michael Tsang

Michael Tsang

Hey guys, learned a great deal from this post. Thank you! Had a question though, I exported as above and was able to get the DVD to burn and play - however I'm noticing an ever so slight sync issue with the audio. Any suggestions on how to fix this?

Egg Media UK

Egg Media UK Plus

i have noticed this a lot of the time too when i have exported DVD's in the past.

However you will notice that sometimes this even happens when watching the big HOLLYWOOD DVD's. I think it's to do with many factors including your Audio Bit rate and codec ... although I'm not 100% sure.

sorry I can't give you a direct answer but maybe someone else here can help point you/us in the right direction :) ....

Jet Leyco

Jet Leyco Plus

Hi Sir,

My video is in full 1920 by 1080 24p, should I export it to mpeg2dvd wide progressive widescreen ntsc? because when i play it on dvd, it seems that it occupy the whole screen, though the audio sync great unlike mpeg2 burn dvd.

Can't I export in at match attributes? Or it is too big (file) for dvd encore?

Thanks!

Jet

Ty Price

Ty Price

There was an early comment that stated, "DVDs have a max bitrate of about 9Mbps for audio and video signal combined."

Does this mean if I export video and audio separately in Premiere that I would get better video quality than if I multiplexed? Assuming the video would use 100% of the 9Mbps rather than lending some of that to the audio.

Maybe a better way to ask the questions is:

Will video quality vary if I multiplex the video/audio or export video separately?

Thanks!

Perrone Ford

Perrone Ford

I need to restate that...

The official spec says that DVD can have a max of about 10.2Mbps if memory serves. That means if you do video at 10Mbps, then your audio gets 2Mbps.

However, I have seen older players fail to play back DVDs when the video bit rate much exceeded 9Mbps, so I generally use that as my upper limit.

It does not matter if you render your video and audio separately, though I do recommend that since the two do not use the same types of compression to be legal on the DVD. Video HAS to be Mpeg2 compressed, and Audio HAS to be uncompressed (WAV or AIFF), or AC3. Some programs can export these correctly in one go, others cannot.

And to directly answer your question, no the video quality will not change if you render separately.

Ty Price

Ty Price

Ok, thanks for your help.

I appreciate the quick response.

4Moorhens2

4Moorhens2

Ty, the exception to the rule would be if you have the DivX codec installed and access to DivX certified DVD players. This generally means that any DivX file (or a series of DivX data files burned in a single session) can be compressed probably more efficiently than MPEG-2 compression at a similar bit rate. DivX encoding also allows the use of a high bit rate mp3 audio track.

Jay Rust

Jay Rust Plus

Great Thread! Thank you all for the knowledge... I know this will help me out...

Telemission.tv

Telemission.tv

Many thanks!
This post finally got me out of the dark.

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

you can burn two different copies to compare i use premiere and i use 720x480 to get the best quality you can crop the video instead of scaling down.
you can take your footage in 1080 and make a black image 720x480 and layer it over your footage and make the opacity at 20% and scale the footage down a little to frame it close to what the hd is i suggest leaving some out to get the best quality

Alan Marsala

Alan Marsala Plus

Thanks for all the help everyone. This took the headache out of tonight!

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

the main thing to me when burning a dvd is finding the best bitrate the size of the image is 720x 480 us users if i was u go into photoshop or make a solid in After effects and make the opacity so you can see through it. then move it around to what looks good befor you crop the image. you dont want scale your video down to much. so if you can get your action almost where you want inside the black solid the scale it down some. i know some have safe margins but i use a solid so you can easily move the solid and not touch the video. intill you know what you want.

Oskar Svensson

Oskar Svensson

Are you seriously recommending people to crop a 1080p video to 480p rather then downscaling it? This would ruin most peoples shot beacause I dont think they thought that they would loose half the image when framing the scene :S. And 720x 480 is not a widescreen resolution in a square pixel project so you want a reference for what you cropping you should use 864x480 or something then use 720x480 for export.

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

im seeing DVD-Video discs have a raw bitrate of 11.08 Mbit/s, with a 1.0 Mbit/s overhead, leaving a payload bitrate of 10.08 Mbit/s. Of this, up to 3.36 Mbit/s can be used for subtitles and a maximum of 9.80 Mbit/s can be split amongst audio and video.

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

what im saying sometimes its better to cut some of the video images so when you scale it down it will have less scaling if you crop befor scaling it doesnt have to downscale as much of the image. thats all im saying dude relax. you dont have to fight me im just giving my option stay humble its all good

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

what im saying sometimes its better to cut some of the video images so when you scale it down it will have less scaling if you crop before scaling it doesn't have to downscale as much of the image. that's all im saying dude relax. you don't have to attack im just giving my option stay humble its all good

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

i called a place after doing research
so its 720 × 480
bitrate 9.8mbps vbr 2 pass

Oskar Svensson

Oskar Svensson

Shawn its great that you are trying to help people but you should think through and take some time with your answers. "bitrate 9.8mbps vbr 2 pass" is a confusing statement, since you are saying vbr 2pass that should mean thats the bitrate for video and that wont leave any for audio. And when selecting bitrate for MPEG-2 in premiere you have to specify min,target,max.

So if you wanna recommend the bitrate to use with Premiere it should look like this: Minimum: 2-3Mbps, Target: 4-6 Maximum: 9.8Mbps-Audio.

And according to Adobe using "Use Maximum Render Quality" will give you better scaling, something that have been pretty bad in Premiere in the past.

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

thats what they women at a dvd producing company said. was just going off what she said.

shawn wytch

shawn wytch

im retesting this since you brought that up ill try your settings. but i would think a dvd company that makes 1000s of copies a day would know more. but i will test.

Oskar Svensson

Oskar Svensson

Did you even read what I said? I didnt say it was incorrect, I said it was confusing to only say 9.8mbps vbr 2 pass since that is the maximum bitrate allowed split amongst audio and video (even you/wikipedia said so a few posts up). And when specifying a VBR bitrate its the average.

Do you know what VBR is? If not it would explain why you are not getting this.

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