NASA Goddard

NASA Goddard

NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission wants to see your photos and videos of precipitation from unique perspectives!

There are many ways to view precipitation. Rain gauges collect water as it hits the ground. Weather radars detect rain and snow as it falls through the air. Research aircraft can measure moisture while flying through clouds, and satellites like the GPM Core Observatory can view precipitation from space.

We'd like to see weather from all angles - far away, up close, above, below and inside - the more creative and unique, the better. Post your coolest photos and videos of precipitation from unique perspectives, and we’ll choose the best ones to post on the NASA Precipitation Measurement Missions websites (pmm.nasa.gov & nasa.gov/gpm).

Please post your submissions as Vimeo URL's here. The submission period is from 11/1/13 to 12/1/13.

Links: pmm.nasa.gov/unique-perspectives, flickr.com/groups/gpm-extreme-weather

crossdocs

crossdocs

Marcus Mangeot
What does it mean, if you have almost no precipitation? Let's have a look at Lima with only 9mm/year!

Thx

Link: vimeo.com/71876796

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