1. DR-TB Pills Animation

    00:33

    from MSF Access Campaign / Added

    711 Plays / / 0 Comments

    How many pills does it take to treat one person with drug-resistant TB? We ask for better treatment now. Read our manifesto and join our campaign: www.msfaccess.org/tbmanifesto

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    • 1. HOW CAN WE REACH MORE CHILDREN WITH VACCINES?

      03:28

      from Arnaud Pitois / Added

      Seven videos around theme of obstacles to immunization, created out of shooting interviews at MSF Vaccines conference in Norway, indispersed with footage from the field to highlight key areas of concern in our Vaccines advocacy dossier. Initially commissioned for and shared with everyone who went to the conference,later sent around more widely to academics/researchers/civil society. Well received. HOW CAN WE REACH MORE CHILDREN WITH VACCINES? Vaccines are not developed originally for children living in poor countries. Many of them – requiring, for instance, refrigerated transportation and storage – are therefore not suited to the conditions of many countries where temperatures can soar above 40C (104F) and where electricity is often intermittent. Stimulating the development of better adapted vaccines is key to improving access to immunisation.

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      • 6. COMPLETING THE IMMUNISATION SCHEDULE

        03:12

        from Arnaud Pitois / Added

        COMPLETING THE IMMUNISATION SCHEDULE In many countries, national immunisation guidelines set out the timetable for childhood vaccination within the first year of life. If the child fails to complete the full set of recommended vaccines by 11 months, there are often no provisions to allow the child to “catch up” on missed vaccinations. While WHO recommends that children older than one year should still be vaccinated in order to complete the immunisation series, this is often not implemented in countries due to concerns about stock outs and as international donors do not usually purchase EPI vaccines for older age groups. Countries and international organisations should implement the WHO recommendations and make sure that children complete their immunisation series, even if they are older than one year.

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        • 2. AFFORDABLE VACCINES

          02:46

          from Arnaud Pitois / Added

          Seven videos around theme of obstacles to immunization, created out of shooting interviews at MSF Vaccines conference in Norway, indispersed with footage from the field to highlight key areas of concern in our Vaccines advocacy dossier. Initially commissioned for and shared with everyone who went to the conference,later sent around more widely to academics/researchers/civil society. AFFORDABLE VACCINES New vaccines are much more expensive than older vaccines. Two of the newest vaccines – against pneumonia and diarrhoea – account for more than 70% of the total cost of vaccinating a child. Reasons for this include a very restricted number of manufacturers in the market resulting in a lack of competition to drive prices down, and a continuing lack of transparency by the vaccine industry over the costs to develop and manufacture vaccines. Greater efforts are needed by GAVI and other major vaccine purchasers, to use their market weight in negotiating more affordable vaccines.

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          • 7. ENGAGING CIVIL SOCIETY

            02:57

            from Arnaud Pitois / Added

            ENGAGING CIVIL SOCIETY Civil Society Organisations are key to supporting Ministries of Health to improve access to vaccination. CSOs play a variety of roles, including direct service delivery, engaging with the most marginalised and hard-to-reach populations and creating demand for vaccination. In the area of advocacy, civil society groups can push governments to be more accountable to their people while influencing global organisations’ support to countries to make it as effective as possible. The role of civil society groups in the most affected countries is particularly important and must be strengthened – at community, national, regional and international level.

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            • 5. REACHING NEGLECTED POPULATIONS

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              from Arnaud Pitois / Added

              REACHING NEGLECTED POPULATIONS While overall progress on improving immunisation coverage has been positive, figures often mask underlying inequities between and within countries. Entire populations may be isolated by conflict, geography or simply extreme poverty, and therefore remain beyond the reach of adequate immunisation services. At the same time, even within richer and more stable countries, where access to immunisation is broadly available, there are communities who are not being reached. Developing and improving policies that are specific to neglected populations – such as refugees, the urban or rural poor, communities living in remote areas, and others – is key to ensuring all people benefit from vaccination.

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              • 4. REACHING ALL CHILDREN WITH VACCINES

                03:05

                from Arnaud Pitois / Added

                REACHING ALL CHILDREN WITH VACCINES Middle Income Countries (MICs) constitute more than 70% of the world’s population. Criteria for access to GAVI Alliance support is based on traditional measures of gross national income (GNI), which excludes the unimmunised living in many middle-income countries. This leaves some vulnerable populations without access to new vaccines. Middle-income countries are often left to negotiate vaccine prices without the help of international actors. As a result, some of these countries are struggling to afford the more expensive new vaccines so that their children can benefit, as well.

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                • 3. GRADUATION

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                  from Arnaud Pitois / Added

                  GRADUATION There are 17 countries currently receiving support and subsidies from GAVI that are due to lose this support by 2016, a process called “graduation.” More countries are entering the graduation process each year. There are concerns that, following the withdrawal of support, countries may not be able to continue to sustain the use of new vaccines, particularly if they are unable to purchase those vaccines at the lower prices that GAVI has negotiated with industry. Graduation is based on per capita GNI – which may not directly reflect massive health and vaccine coverage inequities within countries.

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                  • MSF Scientific Day 2013 Highlights

                    10:02

                    from MSF / Added

                    819 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Once a year, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) holds MSF Scientific Day – a conference to present scientific research carried out in our programmes around the world. There was huge competition for spaces this year and we were very grateful to our Scientific Day editorial reviewing team drawn from across MSF, Epicentre, the Access Campaign, and the journals PLOS Medicine, and Conflict and Health. Key speakers included Hans Rosling, a professor and TED talks alumnus. He has been an adviser to WHO and UNICEF and co-founded MSF in Sweden. Also Paul McMaster, President of MSF UK, Marc DuBois, Executive Director, MSF UK, along with numerous other speakers covering a broad range of topics. There was also a panel discussion on Assessing and Improving the Impact of MSF’s Research, with Philipp du Cros acting as chair, and panellists Dermot Maher (Wellcome Trust), Manica Balasegaram (MSF Access Campaign), Virginia Barbour (PLOS Medicine) and Helen Bygrave (MSF). Our 2013 programme was packed with presentations that reflect the diversity of MSF projects and patients. Take a look at our 2013 poster gallery and sign up for updates about future Scientific Days by clicking the links below: http://www.msf.org.uk/msf-scientific-day

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                    • New vaccines - MSF calls for lower prices

                      05:04

                      from MSF Access Campaign / Added

                      75 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      MSF can only afford to vaccinate the most vulnerable against respiratory tract infections in Yida camp.

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