1. Emily as Marian Anderson

    01:04

    from Mr. Jones Added 27 0 0

    In this short video excerpt, Emily is taking on the role of Marian Anderson during an interactive museum experience at Talcott Fine Arts and Museum Academy during the After School Showcase on May 9, 2013.

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    • Fractured Union

      07:39

      from Fairfax Network Added 3 0 0

      Fractured Union examines the complex and often tumultuous relationships between our founding fathers. Historical interpreters — portraying Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Mason — offer high school students a close look at the statesmen engaged in heated discussions. In this video clip, the Founders comment on the difficulties of creating the government and how the process affected their relationships with one another. (07:39)

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      • Winter (Black and White)

        03:39

        from Peter Faint Added 5 0 0

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        • Washington: What is the place of Thanksgiving on our national calendar?

          02:29

          from What So Proudly We Hail Added 59 0 0

          In this session, editors Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub use George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation and O. Henry's short story "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" to converse with guest host Christopher DeMuth (Hudson Institute) about the meaning of the holiday of Thanksgiving and the role it should play in American life today. How does Thanksgiving—and the way we celebrate it—reflect and contribute to who we are? For more Thanksgiving Day resources, go to: http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/thanksgiving-day

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          • Film Forum Premiere FINAL

            03:18

            from Digital Diaspora Family Reunion Added 7 0 0

            Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People opened in New York on August 27, 2014, marking the start of its national theatrical run. While critics have been enthusiastic in their praise, audiences have been incredibly moved by the experience. We asked a few folks what they thought after viewing this epic new documentary.

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            • Five Days in August, author interview question 3 - How long did we expect it to take for the Japanese to surrender?

              01:01

              from Princeton University Press Added

              Most Americans believe that the Second World War ended because the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan forced it to surrender. Five Days in August boldly presents a different interpretation: that the military did not clearly understand the atomic bomb's revolutionary strategic potential, that the Allies were almost as stunned by the surrender as the Japanese were by the attack, and that not only had experts planned and fully anticipated the need for a third bomb, they were skeptical about whether the atomic bomb would work at all. With these ideas, Michael Gordin reorients the historical and contemporary conversation about the A-bomb and World War II. Gordin posits that although the bomb clearly brought with it a new level of destructive power, strategically it was regarded by decision-makers simply as a new conventional weapon, a bigger firebomb. To lend greater understanding to the thinking behind its deployment, Gordin takes the reader to the island of Tinian, near Guam, the home base for the bombing campaign, and the location from which the anticipated third atomic bomb was to be delivered. He also details how Americans generated a new story about the origins of the bomb after surrender: that the United States knew in advance that the bomb would end the war and that its destructive power was so awesome no one could resist it. Five Days in August explores these and countless other legacies of the atomic bomb in a glaring new light. Daring and iconoclastic, it will result in far-reaching discussions about the significance of the A-bomb, about World War II, and about the moral issues they have spawned.

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              • WORLDWISE Arts and Humanities Dean's Lecture Series presents Annette Gordon-Reed

                01:27:37

                from UMD College of Arts & Humanities Added 84 0 0

                The College of Arts and Humanities presented historian, Harvard Law School professor and Pulitzer Prize winner Annette Gordon-Reed in the second installment of the 2013-14 WORLDWISE Arts and Humanities Dean's Lecture Series.

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                • Taken Hostage, author interview question 3 - How did the Iranian hostage crisis play out?

                  01:54

                  from Princeton University Press Added

                  On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran and took sixty-six Americans captive. Thus began the Iran Hostage Crisis, an affair that captivated the American public for 444 days and marked America's first confrontation with the forces of radical Islam. Using hundreds of recently declassified government documents, historian David Farber takes the first in-depth look at the hostage crisis, examining its lessons for America's contemporary War on Terrorism. Unlike other histories of the subject, Farber's vivid and fast-paced narrative looks beyond the day-to-day circumstances of the crisis, using the events leading up to the ordeal as a means for understanding it. The book paints a portrait of the 1970s in the United States as an era of failed expectations in a nation plagued by uncertainty and anxiety. It reveals an American government ill prepared for the fall of the Shah of Iran and unable to reckon with the Ayatollah Khomeini and his militant Islamic followers. Farber's account is filled with fresh insights regarding the central players in the crisis: Khomeini emerges as an astute strategist, single-mindedly dedicated to creating an Islamic state. The Americans' student-captors appear as less-than-organized youths, having prepared for only a symbolic sit-in with just a three-day supply of food. ABC news chief Roone Arledge, newly installed and eager for ratings, is cited as a critical catalyst in elevating the hostages to cause célèbre status. Throughout the book there emerge eerie parallels to the current terrorism crisis. Then as now, Farber demonstrates, politicians failed to grasp the depth of anger that Islamic fundamentalists harbored toward the United States, and Americans dismissed threats from terrorist groups as the crusades of ineffectual madmen. Taken Hostage is a timely and revealing history of America's first engagement with terrorism and Islamic fundamentalism, one that provides a chilling reminder that the past is only prologue.

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                  • Taken Hostage, author interview question 6 - What parallels do you see between Iran then and Iraq today?

                    03:15

                    from Princeton University Press Added

                    On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran and took sixty-six Americans captive. Thus began the Iran Hostage Crisis, an affair that captivated the American public for 444 days and marked America's first confrontation with the forces of radical Islam. Using hundreds of recently declassified government documents, historian David Farber takes the first in-depth look at the hostage crisis, examining its lessons for America's contemporary War on Terrorism. Unlike other histories of the subject, Farber's vivid and fast-paced narrative looks beyond the day-to-day circumstances of the crisis, using the events leading up to the ordeal as a means for understanding it. The book paints a portrait of the 1970s in the United States as an era of failed expectations in a nation plagued by uncertainty and anxiety. It reveals an American government ill prepared for the fall of the Shah of Iran and unable to reckon with the Ayatollah Khomeini and his militant Islamic followers. Farber's account is filled with fresh insights regarding the central players in the crisis: Khomeini emerges as an astute strategist, single-mindedly dedicated to creating an Islamic state. The Americans' student-captors appear as less-than-organized youths, having prepared for only a symbolic sit-in with just a three-day supply of food. ABC news chief Roone Arledge, newly installed and eager for ratings, is cited as a critical catalyst in elevating the hostages to cause célèbre status. Throughout the book there emerge eerie parallels to the current terrorism crisis. Then as now, Farber demonstrates, politicians failed to grasp the depth of anger that Islamic fundamentalists harbored toward the United States, and Americans dismissed threats from terrorist groups as the crusades of ineffectual madmen. Taken Hostage is a timely and revealing history of America's first engagement with terrorism and Islamic fundamentalism, one that provides a chilling reminder that the past is only prologue.

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                    • Two Rivers

                      02:02

                      from Rodney Mitchell Added 38 0 0

                      The story of a "first if it's kind" native American reconciliation group in the American Northwest. Broadcast nationally on PBS for three years, won several documentary awards, featured in ten national and international film festivals, and currently used by scores of college, governmental, and private diversity training programs.

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