1. Five Days in August, author interview question 8 - What was the role of the Pacific island of Tinian in the history of the bomb?

    03:38

    from Princeton University Press / Added

    Most Americans believe that the Second World War ended because the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan forced it to surrender. Five Days in August boldly presents a different interpretation: that the military did not clearly understand the atomic bomb's revolutionary strategic potential, that the Allies were almost as stunned by the surrender as the Japanese were by the attack, and that not only had experts planned and fully anticipated the need for a third bomb, they were skeptical about whether the atomic bomb would work at all. With these ideas, Michael Gordin reorients the historical and contemporary conversation about the A-bomb and World War II. Gordin posits that although the bomb clearly brought with it a new level of destructive power, strategically it was regarded by decision-makers simply as a new conventional weapon, a bigger firebomb. To lend greater understanding to the thinking behind its deployment, Gordin takes the reader to the island of Tinian, near Guam, the home base for the bombing campaign, and the location from which the anticipated third atomic bomb was to be delivered. He also details how Americans generated a new story about the origins of the bomb after surrender: that the United States knew in advance that the bomb would end the war and that its destructive power was so awesome no one could resist it. Five Days in August explores these and countless other legacies of the atomic bomb in a glaring new light. Daring and iconoclastic, it will result in far-reaching discussions about the significance of the A-bomb, about World War II, and about the moral issues they have spawned.

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    • William Chafe - Obama and the Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

      03:38

      from USEmbassy NZ / Added

      107 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of History Duke University, Durham, North Carolina William Chafe spoke at U.S. Embassy Wellington on September 23, 2010, on the expectations associated with the Obama presidency and the challenges he faces in trying to realize those expectations. He spoke of the dramatic changes in human rights in America that have occurred in the past 50 years, but also the degree to which we (and the President) have generated expectations that are hard to achieve. William Chafe was awarded the Organization of American Historians‟ (OAH) Roy Rosenzweig Distinguished Service Award, given annually to an individual whose contributions have significantly enriched an understanding and appreciation of American history, in April 2010. "To list his distinguished publications is to follow a path that leads through the changing contours of 20th century American history. He has been a path-breaking scholar, one of the few who can write both brilliant monographs and critical and influential syntheses," according to a statement from the organization. "His „The American Woman: Her Changing Social, Economic, and Political Roles, 1920-1970‟ and his „Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom,‟ marked both his debut as a scholar of incredible range and established one of the great and timely themes of his scholarship: race and gender equality." The organization also noted Chafe‟s writings and their use in college classrooms, including "The Unfinished Journey: America Since World War Two" and most recently, "The Rise and Fall of the American Century: The United States from 1890-2009." A leader in the profession, Chafe has also helped develop OAH‟s Leadership Advisory Council, of which he is currently the co-chair. "I can't say how much this award means to me," Chafe said. "I care deeply about the community of American historians, and how important it is for us to represent the diversity of our past and seek full inclusion of all Americans in the narrative of our country's quest to realize its ideals." See also: http://ussc.edu.au/people/william-chafe To watch the entire presentation, visit U.S. Embassy Wellington's iTunes page: http://itunes.apple.com/podcast/u-s-e... http://newzealand.usembassy.gov

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      • Jack London's "To Build a Fire": A man without imagination?

        03:38

        from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

        302 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Jack London, like the unnamed man described in the story “To Build a Fire,” lived on the edge. Born in 1876, he died a short forty years later. As a young man, he was a full-fledged participant in the Yukon Gold Rush of 1897. Like many others at the time, London made the incredibly arduous journey by foot and handcrafted boat from Dyea in Alaska over Chilkoot Pass—a three-quarter-mile 45-degree-angled obstacle course—and eventually down the Yukon River into the Northwest Territories. The only gold he brought back, however, was an experience that he would mine for gems of literature for much of his writing life, as evidenced in his well known novels like "Call of the Wild" and "White Fang," as well as in “To Build a Fire” (1908), all of which draw on the places he saw and the people he met during those hope-filled and brutal times in the Northwestern Yukon territory. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host William Schambra (Hudson Institute) about the story. For more about Jack London and "To Build a Fire," visit www.whatsoproudlywehail.org.

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        • O. Henry: Is the traditional restaurant meal a fitting celebration of Thanksgiving?

          03:37

          from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

          5 Plays / / 0 Comments

          In this session, editors Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub use George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation and O. Henry's short story "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" to converse with guest host Christopher DeMuth (Hudson Institute) about the meaning of the holiday of Thanksgiving and the role it should play in American life today. How does Thanksgiving—and the way we celebrate it—reflect and contribute to who we are? For more Thanksgiving Day resources, go to: http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/thanksgiving-day

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          • O. Henry: Is the traditional restaurant meal the old gentleman and Stuffy Pete share a fitting celebration of Thanksgiving?

            03:37

            from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

            425 Plays / / 0 Comments

            In this session, editors Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub use George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation and O. Henry's short story "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" to converse with guest host Christopher DeMuth (Hudson Institute) about the meaning of the holiday of Thanksgiving and the role it should play in American life today. How does Thanksgiving—and the way we celebrate it—reflect and contribute to who we are? For more Thanksgiving Day resources, go to: http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/thanksgiving-day

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            • Harmony Project Presents: Dream Speech 50

              03:37

              from Kinopicz American / Added

              217 Plays / / 0 Comments

              A tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. through 50 faces and voices of everyday Americans from Columbus, Ohio. Harmony Project, whose mission closely aligns with the key message of Dr. King's “I Have a Dream” speech, brought together 50 diverse faces to celebrate and revisit the speech that changed America. Hear his dream come to life, through the voices of those living that dream today. http://dreamspeech50.com Harmony Project is a leader in providing arts programming and volunteer community service in the greater Columbus metropolitan community. Harmony Project connects Columbus across cultural, social and geographic lines through programming and community building opportunities. People from different generations, points of view and cultural experiences are united through musical training and performance while working side-by-side in collective community service. For more information, please visit http://harmonyproject.com

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              • O. Henry: Does the "old gentleman" give well? Does Stuffy Pete receive his gift well?

                03:36

                from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

                7 Plays / / 0 Comments

                In this session, editors Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub use George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation and O. Henry's short story "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" to converse with guest host Christopher DeMuth (Hudson Institute) about the meaning of the holiday of Thanksgiving and the role it should play in American life today. How does Thanksgiving—and the way we celebrate it—reflect and contribute to who we are? For more Thanksgiving Day resources, go to: http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/thanksgiving-day

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                • O. Henry: Does the "old gentleman" give well? Does Stuffy Pete receive his gift well?

                  03:36

                  from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

                  98 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  In this session, editors Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub use George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation and O. Henry's short story "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" to converse with guest host Christopher DeMuth (Hudson Institute) about the meaning of the holiday of Thanksgiving and the role it should play in American life today. How does Thanksgiving—and the way we celebrate it—reflect and contribute to who we are? For more Thanksgiving Day resources, go to: http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/thanksgiving-day

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                  • Chisholm Trail Ride

                    03:36

                    from Tyler Sharp / Added

                    725 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    This video, made in collaboration with the Texas Historical Commissions' Heritage Trails Program, tells of our plan to ride horseback up the Chisholm Trail. With the help of sponsors and donations, we can finish installing historical makers, and preserve this important piece of Texas and US history. In the Spring of 2013, we plan to ride the nearly 400 miles from San Antonio up to Red River station, just outside of Nocona, Texas. We will be working with locals, county sheriff departments, and branches of the Texas Historical Commission's Heritage Trails Program to document the rich history along the way through photography, writing, and documentary film making. With enough public support on this project, we can also help pass bill H.R. 2849 in the 110th congress, which would designate the Chisholm Trail as a National Historic Trail. www.chisholmtrailride.org

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                    • London: A man without imagination

                      03:35

                      from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

                      142 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Jack London, like the unnamed man described in the story “To Build a Fire,” lived on the edge. Born in 1876, he died a short forty years later. As a young man, he was a full-fledged participant in the Yukon Gold Rush of 1897. Like many others at the time, London made the incredibly arduous journey by foot and handcrafted boat from Dyea in Alaska over Chilkoot Pass—a three-quarter-mile 45-degree-angled obstacle course—and eventually down the Yukon River into the Northwest Territories. The only gold he brought back, however, was an experience that he would mine for gems of literature for much of his writing life, as evidenced in his well known novels like "Call of the Wild" and "White Fang," as well as in “To Build a Fire” (1908), all of which draw on the places he saw and the people he met during those hope-filled and brutal times in the Northwestern Yukon territory. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host William Schambra (Hudson Institute) about the story. For more about Jack London and "To Build a Fire," visit http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-meaning-of-america/freedom-and-individuality

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