1. American History... Why?

    03:02

    from Kensington / Added

    914 Plays / / 0 Comments

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    • Bill Moyers Journal: Harvey Kaye on Thomas Paine

      13:46

      from BillMoyers.com / Added

      909 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Bill talks with Harvey J. Kaye, the founding director of the Center for History and Social Change at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, about Thomas Paine, whom Kaye calls “the greatest radical of a radical age.” Paine’s extraordinary life was both glorious and tragic. He was not always revered as some of our other founding fathers were. During his lifetime he was often feared and lampooned, and under constant threat of prison and death. In his book, Thomas Paine and the Promise of America, Kaye notes that Paine has again become currency in political debate because of a revolutionary idea that spread from the colonies to France and around the globe “that the common people… could be citizens and not merely subjects. That people had it within themselves not only to listen to their superiors, but literally to speak to each other and deliberate and govern themselves.” (Show 141)

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      • Jack London's "To Build a Fire": Is the man typically American?

        03:25

        from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

        898 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Jack London, like the unnamed man described in the story “To Build a Fire,” lived on the edge. Born in 1876, he died a short forty years later. As a young man, he was a full-fledged participant in the Yukon Gold Rush of 1897. Like many others at the time, London made the incredibly arduous journey by foot and handcrafted boat from Dyea in Alaska over Chilkoot Pass—a three-quarter-mile 45-degree-angled obstacle course—and eventually down the Yukon River into the Northwest Territories. The only gold he brought back, however, was an experience that he would mine for gems of literature for much of his writing life, as evidenced in his well known novels like "Call of the Wild" and "White Fang," as well as in “To Build a Fire” (1908), all of which draw on the places he saw and the people he met during those hope-filled and brutal times in the Northwestern Yukon territory. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host William Schambra (Hudson Institute) about the story. For more about Jack London and "To Build a Fire," visit www.whatsoproudlywehail.org.

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        • Monsters in America | Our Historical Obsession with the Hideous and the Haunting

          01:03

          from Baylor University Press / Added

          845 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Monsters and all manner of creeping thing have lived under our beds, in our closets, within our dreams and most terrible nightmares. But, monsters can be, and are, so much more. As Scott Poole shows us, monsters are concoctions of the public imagination, reactions to cultural influences, social change, and historical events. Conflicting anxieties about race, class, gender, sexuality, religious beliefs, science, and politics manifest as haunting beings among the populace. From Victorian-era mad scientists to modern-day serial killers, new monsters appear as American society evolves, paralleling fluctuating challenges to the cultural status quo. Monsters in America: Our Historical Obsession with the Hideous and the Haunting is the true tale of American history - one fear, one monster at a time.

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          • Crash Course Intro

            00:08

            from John Green To Scott County / Added

            844 Plays / / 0 Comments

            In order to get John Green to come to SCHS, a strong, student social media campaign is taking place to grab John Green's attention! Our other social media sites include: Twitter: https://twitter.com/JG2SC Instagram: http://instagram.com/johngreen2sc YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCikyf-oDtZfeipVRLtoGHtA Tumblr: http://johngreen2sc.tumblr.com/ Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/jg2sc/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johngreen.toscottcounty Support your fellow nerdfighters by supporting this worthy cause! *This is directly taken from John Green's Crash Course series. It was edited by Asha Mcwilliams. All credit goes to John Green's animation team.

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            • Thanksgiving Day

              45:00

              from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

              831 Plays / / 0 Comments

              In this session, editors Amy A. Kass, Leon R. Kass, and Diana Schaub use George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation and O. Henry's short story "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" to converse with guest host Christopher DeMuth (Hudson Institute) about the meaning of the holiday of Thanksgiving and the role it should play in American life today. How does Thanksgiving—and the way we celebrate it—reflect and contribute to who we are? For more Thanksgiving Day resources, go to: http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-american-calendar/thanksgiving-day

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              • #707 Treaty of Tripoli Facts

                26:00

                from American Atheists / Added

                766 Plays / / 0 Comments

                American Atheists President Ed Buckner chats about little known facts concerning the Treaty of Tripoli.

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                • Freedom and Individuality: "To Build a Fire" by Jack London

                  43:44

                  from What So Proudly We Hail / Added

                  757 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Jack London, like the unnamed man described in the story “To Build a Fire,” lived on the edge. Born in 1876, he died a short forty years later. As a young man, he was a full-fledged participant in the Yukon Gold Rush of 1897. Like many others at the time, London made the incredibly arduous journey by foot and handcrafted boat from Dyea in Alaska over Chilkoot Pass—a three-quarter-mile 45-degree-angled obstacle course—and eventually down the Yukon River into the Northwest Territories. The only gold he brought back, however, was an experience that he would mine for gems of literature for much of his writing life, as evidenced in his well known novels like "Call of the Wild" and "White Fang," as well as in “To Build a Fire” (1908), all of which draw on the places he saw and the people he met during those hope-filled and brutal times in the Northwestern Yukon territory. Watch editors Amy A. Kass and Leon R. Kass converse with guest host William Schambra (Hudson Institute) about the story. For more about Jack London and "To Build a Fire," visit http://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-meaning-of-america/freedom-and-individuality.

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                  • Lexington and Concord

                    06:26

                    from ColdWater Academy / Added

                    755 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Lexington and Concord, the sites of the first shots and first battle of the Revolutionary War in April 1775. Lexington Green, where controversy surrounds the “shot heard round the world.” Concord Bridge, where the British Army met its match and retreated to Boston. This video is hosted by Dave Stotts of Drive Thru History. The Lexington and Concord segment comes from Drive Thru History’s “American History Series.” The entire DVD set (12 half-hour episodes) is available at http://www.drivethruhistory.com

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                    • Mendi + Keith Obadike : American Cypher at The Studio Museum in Harlem

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                      from Keith Obadike / Added

                      754 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Sound Installation about Race and DNA at The Studio Museum in Harlem New York, NY — The Studio Museum in Harlem presents “American Cypher”, an installation by conceptual artists Mendi + Keith Obadike. This site-specific work is a suite of projects that respond to American stories about race and DNA. The project was originally commissioned by the Griot Institute for Africana Studies and the Samek Art Gallery of Bucknell University and includes a sound & video installation with a series of letterpress prints and a book. The artists consider the role of DNA in contemporary American culture through five stories about black Americans that hinge on deciphering genetic code. These stories include the racial politics of genetic researcher James Watson, the dream ancestry of Oprah Winfrey, the use of DNA in the criminal justice system, and the code of president Barack Obama. At the center of the project is the story of Sally Hemings, the enslaved woman who bore several children by President Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson and Hemings had been rumored (by political rivals and Hemings’ own children) since the early 1800s to have had some kind of an affair. In 1998 DNA evidence linked Hemings’ offspring to the Jefferson family, proving centuries-old rumors, controversial scholarship, and oral history about their relationship to be true. The artists made original recordings of Hemings’ last surviving possession, a small bell given to her by Martha Jefferson (Thomas Jefferson’s wife and Hemings’ half sister) that is on exhibit today at Jefferson’s Motnicello mansion in Virginia. From these digitally altered recordings they created a soundscape that is currently playing at The Studio Museum in Harlem. The artists use the genetic code of the Hemings and Jefferson family lines as a musical score to generate the soundscape. Mendi + Keith Obadike are interdisciplinary artists whose music, live art, and conceptual Internet artworks have been exhibited internationally. Their work generated much discussion online and offline when they offered Keith's "blackness" for sale on eBay in 2001 as an Internet performance. Their works have been exhibited at The Whitney's Artport, The New Museum and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Their opera masquerade, "Four Electric Ghosts," was developed at Toni Morrison's Atelier at Princeton University in 2005 and commissioned by the Kitchen in New York in 2009. They were awarded the Pick Laudati Digital Art Award from Northwestern University for Big House / Disclosure, a 200-hour sound installation commemorating the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the British slave trade. Other awards include a Rockefeller Fellowship for New Media Art, New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction, and the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Prize for Mendi's book of poetry Armor and Flesh. This exhibition opened March 28th and closes June 30th.

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