1. The Charity for Civil Servants Abseil - Royal Courts of Justice

    01:42

    from The Charity for Civil Servants / Added

    34 Plays / / 0 Comments

    The Charity organised a sponsored abseil down the Thomas More Building at the Royal Courts of Justice on 22 June 2013. More than £6,000 was raised by over 50 intrepid abseilers, each of whom took the plunge to fundraise for their Charity.

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    • Public Works - Architecture by Civil Servants

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      from OMA / Added

      946 Plays / / 0 Comments

      An exhibition for ST AGNES church, Berlin, 2013

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      • Civil Servants in Somaliland

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        from What Took You So Long? / Added

        403 Plays / / 0 Comments

        UNDP has been working with government stakeholders in Somaliland, Puntland and South Central Somalia since 2005 to support institutional development, including building a well-managed, inclusive and effective civil service that responds to the needs of the Somali people. This video highlights the achievements that have been made in civil service reform in Somaliland.

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        • The People Behind the Service

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          from Michael Connolly / Added

          18 Plays / / 0 Comments

          This commercial by Compass360 Design and Advertising for the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) was shot on locations from coast to coast. I was the producer/production coordinator/camera assistant. (I don't have a high resolution copy of the ad.)

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          • Fun Week 2012: Merseyside Jobcentre Plus "Mini Olympics"

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            from The Charity for Civil Servants / Added

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            Staff at Jobcentre Plus offices across Merseyside strained every sinew to raise money for Fun Week 2012. They organised a "Mini Olympics" at Langtree Park, the home of St. Helens Rugby Football League Club. The event was a tremendous success and raised £420!

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            • Sacred and the City: Megan Moodie, Religion and the Subaltern Civil Servant: Scheduled Tribe followers of Radhasoami in Jaipur

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              from Center for South Asia / Added

              121 Plays / / 0 Comments

              What are the promises for social uplift made by the Indian state and how are they interpreted and appropriated by minoritized communities in urban spaces? What do these promises have in common with those of religion? What can we learn through ethnographic attention to zones of contact perhaps quite literally urban neighborhoods – where subaltern groups encounter both religion and the civil service? In the last several decades, members of the Dhanka Scheduled Tribe in Jaipur City have embraced three social locations from which they have drawn cultural resources for their efforts towards social uplift and upward mobility: the Radhasoami faith, the lower rungs of the civil service, and the city of Jaipur itself. In each of these three spaces, a discursive and institutional commitment to equality is contradicted by social practices that reinforce hierarchy and difference. In the Radhasoami tradition, all people are considered equal before the guru; the civil service is su pposed to be a great equalizer and, through reservations, ensure that scheduled communities are adequately represented in the functioning of government and provided with some upward mobility via job security, particularly in low level positions; urban spaces, in and of themselves, are expected to erase orthodox caste distinctions found in villages. Indeed, many Dhanka would agree that participation in Radhasoami and the civil service largely as employees in the Public Health and Engineering Department working as sewer pipe fitters“ have made life better for their community over the last several decades. Formerly stick-and-tarp bastis have been transformed into pukka neighborhoods with individual water taps and reliable electrical connections. Men who previously drank and failed to support their families have become sober and temperate householders. Yet, Dhanka participation in these spaces of uplift is always circumscribed by their ambiguous tribal/ “untouchable” status: their ongoing relationship with the PHED and Jaipur’s sewers mirrors their “participation” in Radhasoami for whom one of their primary voluntary activities is setting up latrines at the satsang grounds outside the city when Radhasoami comes to speak. Rather than treating these spaces as instances of failed democratic promise, however, I argue that ethnographic attention to how the Dhanka themselves narrate their participation casts light on how subaltern communities maintain and augment promises of uplift despite their inevitable failure by and in institutions of religion and the state; central to this augmentation is their commitment to (re)building their neighborhood and recasting its relationship to Jaipur City. Megan Moodie is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she studies the sociality engendered by legal and economic projects for uplift and empowerment, including affirmative action, microfinance, and gender-based rights assertions. She is currently working on a book manuscript based on ethnographic fieldwork with an urban tribal community in Jaipur, India.

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              • Feature story: Changing of the Guard (1)

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                from Brittyn Clennett / Added

                59 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Inside Story feature on Hong Kong's civil service, put together by me. The 1st July marked the 15th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to China after more than 150 years of British rule. Before 1997, there were several thousand expatriates in the civil service, but today there are less than 200. Some left as a result of a controversial localisation scheme, making way for a new generation of overseas-educated Chinese locals. Others fled, fearing change, with many concerned that the good reputation of the civil service would be compromised. But those who stayed on throughout the transition say those fears were unfounded and believe the changes since the handover have allowed the city to come of age.

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                • Feature story: Changing of the Guard (2)

                  11:10

                  from Brittyn Clennett / Added

                  73 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  The 1st July marked the 15th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to China after more than 150 years of British rule. Before 1997, there were several thousand expatriates in the civil service, but today there are less than 200. Some left as a result of a controversial localisation scheme, making way for a new generation of overseas-educated Chinese locals. Others fled, fearing change, with many concerned that the good reputation of the civil service would be compromised. But those who stayed on throughout the transition say those fears were unfounded and believe the changes since the handover have allowed the city to come of age. Interviewees: Ian Scott City University of Hong Kong Professor Dorothy Silkstone Lands Department Ex-Assistant Director (1981 - 2012) Joseph Wong Civil Service Ex-Secretary (2000 - 2006) Peter R. Morgan Police Assistant Commissioner Recruited in 1981 Roger Nissim Lands Department Ex-Assistant Director (1973 -1993) Sun Hung Kai Properties Project Planning Department Manager (1993 - 2008) Mike Rowse Government Administrative Officer (1980 - 2008) ICAC Operations and Corruption Prevention Departments (1974 - 1980) Philip Sham Police Chief Superintendent Recruited in 1980 Kevin P. Zervos Department of Justice Director of Public Prosecutions Recruited in 1992 Mani Vachha Ex-Senior Accounting Officer (1977 - 1989) Bernard Chan Executive and Legislative Councils Ex-member

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                  • Canada's civil service cutback

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                    from Merv Unger / Added

                    The government has the cart before the horse on civil service cutback. Trim bureaucracy first, then cut staff

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                    • Meet ENA

                      08:18

                      from Ecole nationale d'administration / Added

                      4,620 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Created by General de Gaulle in October 1945, the founding principles of the Ecole nationale d’administration are to broaden access to the highest executive levels of government service, and to provide professional training for senior civil servants.

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