1. Healthy Lifestyle a Natural Enemy of Colon Cancer

    01:54

    from Lee Memorial Health System Added 4 0 0

    Most days Monica Harmon is right here, pedaling away. “We do this an hour,” says Harmon. She has many miles behind her, not to mention years. “85 years old,” says Harmon. Her good habits have served her well. She exercises, watches her weight, eats vegetables and makes a point to get fiber in her diet. All things experts find go a long way in preventing colon cancer, the second most common cancer in the US. “It is prevalent in this country because some of the risk factors are also prevalent in this country,” says Dr. Rajeev Prabakaran, who is a gastroenterologist on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. The GI community stresses prevention: colonoscopies playing an instrumental role in thwarting colorectal cancers. “That’s one of the only screening tests that is available that is able to do that,” says Dr. Prabakaran. A colonoscopy looks for polyps that may turn cancerous and removes them, impacting disease at its initial stage. But research shows people can lower their risk even more by adopting a healthy lifestyle, which is a natural enemy of colon cancer. “Healthy diets have been shown to reduce the risk of developing colon cancer. Grains and fibers can help reduce the toxin build-up in the body and help sort of get things out of the colon in a proper manner. Also physical activity,” says Dr. Prabakaran. Monica works all the angles, recently undergoing a colonoscopy. “They found a little polyp, they took a biopsy and it’s okay,” says Harmon. Even if the news hadn’t been good, her wholesome habits may have saved her. “People that have followed the healthy lifestyle and good nutrition prior to their diagnosis, their survival rates are higher,” says Dr. Prabakaran. Making a healthy lifestyle a cornerstone of colorectal health. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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    • One-stage laparoscopic hepatic resection & robot-assisted right colectomy+abdominoperineal resection

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      from Colorectal Disease Journal Added 6 1 0

      This video shows a combined laparoscopic hepatic resection and robot-assisted right hemicolectomy and abdominoperineal resection. The video is associated with a Video Vignette accepted for publication in the journal Colorectal Disease (http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.12771). Click Subscribe to this channel for the newest and most up-to-date content for free! Authors: J. Desiderio, S. Trastulli, R. Cirocchi, F. Ricci, C. Boselli, G. Noya, A. Redler, A. Santoro, A. Parisi Video associated with Colorectal Disease Journal (published by Wiley and associated with the Association of Coloproctology Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP) and Spanish Society of Coloproctology (SSC).

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      • Laparoscopic Right Hemicolectomy (Complete Mesocolic Excision): Uncinate First Approach

        05:46

        from Colorectal Disease Journal Added 2 0 0

        This video shows the technique of performing a laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with complete mesocolic excision using an "uncinate first approach". The video is associated with a Video Vignette that has been submitted for publication to Colorectal Disease (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journa...). Click Subscribe to this channel for the most up-to-date content! Authors: Prof Dr Stefan Benz. Institution: Kilinikum Boblingen-Sindelfingen, Germany. Corresponding author email: S.Benz@klinikverbund-suedwest.de Video associated with Colorectal Disease Journal (published by Wiley and associated with the Association of Coloproctology Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP) and Spanish Society of Coloproctology (SSC).

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        • Location Matters with Colorectal Cancer

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          from Lee Memorial Health System Added 8 0 0

          Location, location, location. As with many things, it counts when it comes to colorectal cancer. Disease that affects the lower GI tract is divided into colon and rectal cancer. They are treated differently based on location. “Colon cancer is a bit more straightforward. Usually you just take it out and if the lymph nodes are positive then you get chemo,” says Dr. Janette Gaw, who is a colorectal surgeon on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Ken Lemme learned firsthand. A large tumor in his colon reached down to the rectum; requiring extra steps to treatment. “I started radiation treatments in December. I had 28 treatments and February 17th I was in the hospital doing surgery,” says Lemme. When treating rectal cancer, radiation and chemo typically come first. Followed by surgery and many times, more chemo. “I am in the end of that segment now. I’ve got two more weeks of chemotherapy,” says Lemme. Rectal cancer has deeper implications because the lower GI tract is situated inside the pelvis. A small space, it makes getting clear margins during surgery more difficult. Undergoing treatment first leads to greater success. “Chemo and radiation, when you receive it beforehand it helps with the surgery because it shrinks the tumor and also decreases the local recurrence,” says Dr. Gaw. Historically, patients with rectal cancer faced a permanent colostomy. Now it is often a temporary state. “Once that area heals then we just reverse them and so they can go to the bathroom normally,” says Dr. Gaw. “I was lucky enough to be where I am and able to get it early enough and to be able to move on,” says Lemme. A tough diagnosis, with the right approach to treatment, rectal cancer still has good outcomes. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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          • Insights Into Cancer July 17 2015

            01:17:28

            from Simms/Mann UCLA Center Added

            Colorectal Cancer: Recent Advances in Detection and Treatment Zev Wainberg, MD

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            • Raghib Ali: INDOX Cancer Research Network

              03:57

              from NDM Oxford Added 2 0 0

              The INDOX Cancer Research Network is a collaboration between Oxford and twelve leading cancer centres in India. As Director of this Network, Dr Raghib Ali aims to improve early detection of cancer and to develop effective and affordable cancer treatments for low and middle-income countries. Dr Ali's main interest is in colorectal (bowel) cancer and other chronic, non-communicable diseases. Incidence of colorectal cancer in India has been relatively low historically; understanding why may help us establish risk factors and also lead to new treatments.

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              • Young People May Need Colonoscopy

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                from Lee Memorial Health System Added 14 0 0

                Only a fraction of people who should get a colonoscopy actually do- if it’s a hard sell for people at the recommended age of fifty- it’s a long-shot for a younger generation. But in many cases, their life could depend on it. “A lot of times I’ll see patients in the office who’ll say ‘I’m 45 I really don’t need a colonoscopy and I don’t really know why I’m here Dr. Moenning’ and I say ‘well you’re here because you have symptoms.’” Dr. Moenning is a colorectal surgeon with Lee Memorial Health System. Beginning at age 50, both men and women of average risk should undergo a screening to look for polyps that lead to colorectal cancer. The exception is people who fall into a high-risk category. “You have a strong family history of colon cancer - who is defined as someone who may be a parent or a first degree relative. In addition high risk groups would be defined as somebody who they themselves have a history of colon polyp, they may have a history of ulcerative colitis, or Crohn’s colitis,” says Dr. Moenning. Even two decades ago it was rare to find patients in their 20s, 30s or 40s with colorectal cancer. Now it is less surprising. The number of young-to-middle aged people is steadily climbing and studies predict that to continue. Experts believe young people should be proactive when it comes to any symptoms. “Just because you have abdominal pain does not mean you have colon cancer. But if you look at all those symptoms and in aggregate you say ‘is this normal for somebody’s whose 35 years old to have GI bleeding, is it normal to have this degree of abdominal pain?’ If we educate them, it gives them an opportunity to take control of their own health,” says Dr. Moenning. The later cancer is picked up the poorer the prognosis. So acting aggressive with any unusual bowel activity is the smart move. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                • The Increasing Role of Genomics in Colorectal Cancer

                  03:51

                  from Patient Power Added 20 0 0

                  Medical oncologist and Assistant Professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Dr. Stacey Shiovitz, specializes in genetics and colorectal cancer. She discusses a new approach to research that is helping with treatment selections for patients. In addition to looking at the tumor size and growth, doctors are now looking at the DNA within the tumor. The progress has been made in moving away from just looking at the stage of the cancer and focusing more on the genes. Dr. Shiovitz encourages patients to speak with their health care team about specific characteristics of their tumors, because it can assist with treatment eligibility and maximize their potential of acquiring the best treatment options.

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                  • PD-1 Blockade in Tumors With Mismatch Repair Deficiency

                    08:31

                    from Harborside Press Added 173 1 0

                    Dung T. Le, MD of Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center At Johns Hopkins University and Axel Grothey, MD, of the Mayo Clinic discuss how mismatch repair status predicts clinical benefit of immune checkpoint blockade with pembrolizumab. (LBA100)

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                    • Issues of Value in Colorectal Cancer Treatment

                      04:59

                      from Harborside Press Added 79 0 0

                      John L. Marshall, MD, of Georgetown University discusses how the cost of care affects behavior and decision-making on the part of patients and oncologists.

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