1. Happy Holidays from DCCCD - 2013

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    from DCCCD / Added

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    Happy Holidays from DCCCD and Dr. Wright Lassiter! www.dcccd.edu

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    • Toyota Entry-Level Technician- Automotive Travis Blake

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      from Career Vision / Added

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      http://www.T-TEN.com | 1-800-441-5141 Career Description: Entry-Level automotive service technicians are those that have just graduated from an automotive technology program or have just entered the auto repair business. Without experience and further training, these technicians are at the basic skill level. They repair and discuss minor faults, demonstrate basic product knowledge, can extract and read automotive computer and scan tool codes and data, and can demonstrate a factory-approved diagnostic procedure in one or more of the ASE (National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence) repair areas, like brakes, suspension, steering, basic electricity, or engine performance. These technicians perform assigned tasks under direct or indirect supervision. Automotive service technicians inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks, such as vans and pickups. In the past, these workers were called "mechanics," however, today's level of technology in the modern automobile makes the term "technician" more appropriate. When mechanical or electrical troubles occur, technicians first get a description of the symptoms directly from the owner or, if they work in a large shop, the service consultant who prepared the repair order. To locate the problem, technicians use a diagnostic strategy approach. First, they inspect and test to see if components and systems are working properly, then they rule out those components or systems that could not logically be the cause of the problem (process of elimination). They look for the root cause of the customer's concern. In the most modern shops of automobile dealers, service technicians use electronic service equipment, such as digital multimeters (DMM), 5-gas exhaust gas analyzers, hand-held diagnostic scan tool computers, and personal computers (PC) along with PC- based diagnostic tools. These electronic service tools diagnose problems and make accurate measurements that allow precision adjustments. It is the technician's job to perform reprogramming of the vehicle computer using the hand-held scan tool with new programming downloaded from either large computerized databases. Earnings: Salary.com reported that an automotive technician with 0 to 2 years of experience earned a median salary of $33,466, not including commission. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, median hourly wage-and-salary earnings of automotive service technicians and mechanics, including commission, were $16.88 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $12.44 and $22.64 per hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $9.56, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $28.71 per hour. Median annual wages in the industries employing the largest numbers of service technicians were as follows: * Local government, excluding schools: $20.07 * Automobile dealers: $19.61 * Automotive repair and maintenance: $15.26 * Gasoline stations: $15.22 * Automotive parts, accessories, and tire stores: $14.90 Many experienced technicians employed by automobile dealers and independent repair shops receive a commission related to the labor cost charged to the customer. Under this system, weekly earnings depend on the amount of work completed. Employers frequently guarantee commissioned technicians a minimum weekly salary. Some employees offer health and retirement benefits, but such compensation packages are not universal and can vary widely. Required Education Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that people seeking work in automotive service complete a formal training program in high school or in a postsecondary vocational school or community college. However, some service technicians still learn the trade solely by assisting and learning from experienced workers. Acquiring National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification is important for those seeking work in large, urban areas. Most employers regard the successful completion of a vocational training program in automotive service technology as the best preparation for trainee positions. High school programs, while an asset, vary greatly in scope. Graduates of these programs may need further training to become qualified. Some of the more extensive high school programs participate in Automotive Youth Education Service (AYES), a partnership between high school automotive repair programs, automotive manufacturers, and franchised automotive dealers. All AYES high school programs are certified by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. Students who complete these programs are well prepared to enter entry-level technician positions or to advance their technical education. Courses in automotive repair, electronics, physics, chemistry, English, computers, and mathematics provide a good educational background for a career as a service technician. Postsecondary automotive technician training programs usually provide intensive career preparation through a combination of classroom instruction and hands-on practice. Schools update their curriculums frequently to reflect changing technology and equipment. Some trade and technical school programs provide concentrated training for 6 months to a year, depending on how many hours the student attends each week, and award a certificate. Community college programs usually award a certificate or an associate degree. Some students earn repair certificates in a particular skill and leave to begin their careers. Associate degree programs, however, usually take 2 years to complete and include classes in English, basic mathematics, computers, and other subjects, as well as automotive repair. Recently, some programs have added classes on customer service, stress management, and other employability skills. Some formal training programs have alliances with tool manufacturers that help entry-level technicians accumulate tools during their training period. Various automobile manufacturers and participating franchised dealers also sponsor 2-year associate degree programs at postsecondary schools across the Nation. Students in these programs typically spend alternate 6- to 12-week periods attending classes full time and working full time in the service departments of sponsoring dealers. At these dealerships, students work with an experienced worker who provides hands-on instruction and timesaving tips. Those new to automotive service usually start as trainee technicians, technicians' helpers, or lubrication workers, and gradually acquire and practice their skills by working with experienced mechanics and technicians. In many cases, on-the-job training may be a part of a formal education program. With a few months' experience, beginners perform many routine service tasks and make simple repairs. While some graduates of postsecondary automotive training programs are often able to earn promotion to the journey level after only a few months on the job, it typically takes 2 to 5 years of experience to become a fully qualified service technician, who is expected to quickly perform the more difficult types of routine service and repairs. An additional 1 to 2 years of experience familiarizes technicians with all types of repairs. Complex specialties, such as transmission repair, require another year or two of training and experience. In contrast, brake specialists may learn their jobs in considerably less time because they do not need complete knowledge of automotive repair. Employers increasingly send experienced automotive service technicians to manufacturer training centers to learn to repair new models or to receive special training in the repair of components, such as electronic fuel injection or air-conditioners. Motor vehicle dealers and other automotive service providers may send promising beginners or experienced technicians to manufacturer-sponsored technician training programs to upgrade or maintain employees' skills. Factory representatives also visit many shops to conduct short training sessions. The ability to diagnose the source of a problem quickly and accurately requires good reasoning ability and a thorough knowledge of automobiles. Many technicians consider diagnosing hard-to-find troubles one of their most challenging and satisfying duties. For trainee automotive service technician jobs, employers look for people with strong communication and analytical skills. Technicians need good reading, mathematics, and computer skills to study technical manuals. They must also read to keep up with new technology and learn new service and repair procedures and specifications. Training in electronics is vital because electrical components, or a series of related components, account for nearly all malfunctions in modern vehicles. Trainees must possess mechanical aptitude and knowledge of how automobiles work. Experience working on motor vehicles in the Armed Forces or as a hobby can be very valuable. ASE certification has become a standard credential for automotive service technicians. While not mandatory for work in automotive service, certification is common for all non entry-level technicians in large, urban areas. Certification is available in 1 or more of 8 different areas of automotive service, such as electrical systems, engine repair, brake systems, suspension and steering, and heating and air-conditioning. For certification in each area, technicians must have at least 2 years of experience and pass the examination. Completion of an automotive training program in high school, vocational or trade school, or community or junior college may be substituted for 1 year of experience. For ASE certification as a Master Automobile Technician, technicians must be certified in all eight areas. By becoming skilled in multiple auto repair services, technicians can increase their value to their employer and their pay. Experienced technicians who have administrative ability sometimes advance to shop supervisor or service manager. Those with sufficient funds many times open independent automotive repair shops. Technicians who work well with customers may become automotive repair service estimators. Transcript: So what are you working on today, Travis? I'm Travis Blake. I'm a service technician for Mossy Toyota in San Diego. When I got my first car, my old truck, I had an old '88 Toyota pickup that like to break down a lot, and I got tired of paying someone to fix it. So I got interested in working on that. And I wanted more information once I started working on it. No one could provide that to me. And then I found out about the T-TEN program, and I started that, and liked all the information that I was learning. I realized that I could really do this for a living, make a career out of it. The T-TEN program that I started was at Miramar College. It's a local community college here in San Diego. And they have an internship program. It's an actual class that you work at a dealership and you gain experience. So you're getting experience in the dealership, and you're also learning classroom instruction, learning the theory behind all of the automotive principals that are applied in the cars. So you learn theory at night. And then when you're at work you're learning the actual practical application of the information you learned in class. If you don't have a job yet it makes it extremely much more easy to find a job, especially with Toyota, through the T-TEN program. But if you don't have a job and you just want to go to school, you have a wealth of knowledge that they've provide with you, so that when you get out of school you can have no problem finding a job after school. After I got out of the T-TEN program, and I was hired with Toyota, some of my first duties were doing minor services such as oil changes and tire rotations. And then once I got put on a team, I was able to advance and constantly learn more, and started replacing breaks, and doing more major services, and things like that. And then I eventually got into learning how to diagnose problems with customer cars. This is the new, brand new, TIS techstream diagnostic tool. It took the place of our old scan tool, which was in use for over 10 years. Through the T-TEN program, through the more advanced classes they have, like electrical mastery and advanced fuel diagnosis, how to use more advanced tools like this to connect with the vehicles, and to connect with the computers and find out what's going on electrically, the problems that we might encounter. Where I stand right now is if you hand me a Toyota vehicle with a problem there's a 99.9% chance that I'll be able to know what that problem is and then fix it. What I enjoy most about my job is taking a car that's not running right, or that has a problem-- a customer's complaining about a problem with their car-- figuring out if the problem is something that we can fix, and then finding out the solution to that problem and then basically satisfying the customer, making someone happy with their car again that was unhappy to begin with, and fixing the car right the first time. It's the most satisfying thing to me. Working on my own car in my driveway led me to choose this as my career. I haven't even looked back.

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      • ARCC: Beyond Compliance, Taking a Deeper Look

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        The Accountability Report for Community Colleges presented by the San José • Evergreen Community College District.

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        • Students talk about Toyota T-TEN Technician Training Program

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          from VirtualJobShadow.com / Added

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          http://www.T-TEN.com T-TEN is a world-renowned technical training program with a proven record of placing thousands of Toyota and Lexus certified technicians in well-paid dealership positions. As a T-TEN student, you will learn-and earn-in a supportive environment while receiving instruction from factory-trained teachers and guidance from dealership mentors. You will graduate from the program with the confidence, skills and certifications needed to launch yourself on a challenging and profitable career. Learn more at: http://www.T-TEN.com Service technicians earn good salaries and benefits. Average annual income for entry-level technicians is $28,000, according to the National Automobile Dealers Association. Skilled, experienced technicians earn an average of $66,000. Technician pay and benefits vary by market area and from dealership to dealership. Many dealerships offer health insurance, 401(k) plans and other benefits. Technicians are in demand nationwide. Their skills are portable and can't be outsourced overseas. Service departments are a crucial part of a dealership. They contain more people, equipment and technology than any other department and typically generate more profits. Skilled technicians are the key to any successful service department. Technicians usually begin their careers performing basic maintenance, safety inspections and minor repairs. As your skills and experience grow, you will diagnose, repair or replace items such as brake systems, transmissions, heating and air conditioning units and cooling systems. When you become a master technician, you will be able to tackle the most challenging repairs. Along with technical skills, technicians need good communication abilities to work with service advisors, fellow technicians and customers. An eagerness to continually learn and develop skills is also important for success. EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS: You need at least a high school diploma or its equivalent to be considered for a dealership technician position. A good record in classes such as math, computers and auto technology is also desirable. Graduating from a manufacturer-approved program, such as T-TEN, makes you especially attractive to employers. The program provides classroom education and in-dealership experience. It also allows you to start your career with important certifications from Toyota and industry organizations, such as ASE. T-TEN credentials help you get hired and accelerate your career. Click here to see the career path for Toyota and Lexus technicians. CAREER PATH: Service Technician > Line / Mid-Level Technician > Master Technician > Assistant Service Manager > Service Manager > Director of Fixed Operations > General Manager Technicians begin their careers performing entry-level tasks, such as basic maintenance, oil changes, safety inspections and minor repairs. After gaining experience and earning ASE and manufacturer certifications, technicians get upgraded to mid-level technicians with additional responsibilities and higher pay. Continued education and hands-on experience leads to master technician status. Manufacturers have minimum time requirements to climb from entry-level to mid-level and then to master technician but advancement depends on the ambition and abilities of the technician. Technicians with a solid educational background in a program such as T-TEN typically advance faster. Click here to see career advancement for a Toyota and Lexus technician. SALARY & BENEFITS: Service technicians earn good salaries and benefits. Average annual income for entry-level technicians is $28,000, according to the National Automobile Dealers Association. Skilled, experienced technicians earn an average of $66,000. Technician pay and benefits vary by market area and from dealership to dealership. Many dealerships offer health insurance, 401(k) plans and other benefits. Technicians are in demand nationwide. Their skills are portable and can't be outsourced overseas. Did you know: Auto dealerships are major economic engines, providing more than 1.1 million jobs across the country. The typical dealership employs 53 people earning an average of more than $45,000 annually. MORE ABOUT T-TEN: T-TEN is a world-renowned technical training program with a proven record of placing thousands of Toyota and Lexus certified technicians in well-paid dealership positions. Toyota, Lexus and Scion dealerships across the country need thousands of well-trained technicians to keep up with the demands of their service departments. Toyota created T-TEN to help aspiring technicians get the training they need to quickly fill those positions and begin interesting and rewarding careers. T-TEN is a partnership among Toyota, community colleges and vocational schools, and Toyota and Lexus dealerships across the country. Together, they provide state-of-the-art automotive training in both a classroom and dealership setting. As a T-TEN student, you will learn-and earn-in a supportive environment while receiving instruction from factory-trained teachers and guidance from dealership mentors. You will graduate from the program with the confidence, skills and certifications needed to launch yourself on a challenging and profitable career. Earn a Great Income: Some highly skilled and highly motivated Toyota and Lexus technicians earn more than $70,000 each year. (Source: NADA) Some highly skilled and highly motivated Toyota and Lexus technicians earn more than $70,000 each year. Experienced technicians earn average annual wages of more than $66,000. Entry-level dealership technicians earn an average of $28,000, according to a 2005 survey by the National Automobile Dealers Association. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, service technicians earn higher wages working in new and used car dealerships than in independent repair shops. T-TEN helps place students into entry-level dealership positions and also accelerates their career and earning power. Have Job Security: Toyota and Lexus dealerships project a need for 22,000 new technicians by 2011. (Source: Toyota) Toyota and Lexus dealerships project a need for 22,000 new technicians by 2011. That demand translates into opportunity and job security for T-TEN graduates. Dealerships nationwide have more than 36,000 vacant service department positions available annually, according to an Auto Retailing Today survey. That number will grow as more vehicles are on the road and an older generation of technicians retires. Unlike many other professions, service technicians are not in danger of seeing their jobs outsourced abroad. Work with Skilled Team: T-TEN students work at dealerships with the support of a Toyota mentor and other team members. T-TEN students work at dealerships with the support of a Toyota mentor and other team members. Dealership internships are a major part of the T-TEN program. Internships match students with experienced technicians who serve as mentors. Students learn technical skills and develop good work habits through their mentor's guidance. Once hired, T-TEN graduates can work as part of a skilled technician team or independently under the continued supervision of an experienced shop foreman to provide for continued skill development along with the camaraderie and satisfaction of working on a dedicated team. Work with Innovative Technology: Toyota and Lexus are technology trailblazers. Toyota is a market leader in sales and a technology trailblazer. Its hybrid system is environmentally friendly and popular with consumers. Other technological advances make Toyota vehicles reliable and fun to drive, and also interesting to maintain and repair. You will use advanced diagnostic and repair tools to work with Toyota technology. View a technology demonstration for some of the systems and problems you will study and master.

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          • Sand Up Comedian Michael Jr. on Community College Students

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            Michael Jr. is a fresh Stand Up Comedian whose smooth delivery and hilarious content make him a rising star to watch. For more information on Michael Jr. visit http://bit.ly/KFIUSs

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            • Mid-level Automotive Technician at Toyota, T-TEN Grad and ASE certified

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              http://www.T-TEN.com | 1-800-441-5141 Mid-level automotive service technicians are those who have been automotive technicians for at least two years. They hold at least one, and perhaps several, ASE certifications in different specialized areas, such as brakes, electrical/electronic systems, and engine performance. ("ASE" refers to the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence, an independent organization that certifies the skills of professional technicians and also certifies the quality of automotive technology programs offered by high schools and colleges.) Many mid-level technicians have associate's degrees in automotive technology from a community college. Automotive service technicians inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks, such as vans and pickups. In the past, these workers were called "mechanics," however, today's level of technology in the modern automobile makes the term "technician" more appropriate. In the most modern shops of automobile dealers, service technicians use electronic service equipment, such as digital multimeters (DMM), 5-gas exhaust gas analyzers, hand-held diagnostic scan tool computers, and personal computers (PC) along with PC- based diagnostic tools. These electronic service tools diagnose problems and make accurate measurements that allow precision adjustments. It is the technician's job to perform reprogramming of the vehicle computer using the hand-held scan tool with new programming downloaded from either large computerized databases . During routine service, technicians perform diagnostic inspections and repair or replace parts before they can fail in a preventive maintenance process. Technicians usually follow a checklist to ensure they examine all the right components. Belts, hoses, fuses, spark plugs, brake and fuel systems, and other potentially troublesome items are among those that are closely watched. Service technicians use a variety of tools in their work, including power tools, such as pneumatic wrenches to remove bolts quickly, machine tools like lathes and grinding machines to resurface brake rotors/drums, welding and flame-cutting equipment to remove and repair exhaust systems, and jacks and hoists to lift cars and engines. They also use common hand tools like screwdrivers, pliers and wrenches to work on small parts and in hard-to-reach places. Automotive technicians usually own their hand tools, and many experienced workers have thousands of dollars invested in their sets accumulated over the years. Mid-level technicians possess advanced automotive knowledge about a manufacturer's proprietary systems and can diagnose and repair problems efficiently with minimal supervision. Mid-level technicians can interpret and read computer and scan tool codes and data as described in the service manual. They perform factory-approved repair procedures and diagnose, remove, and replace system components. It usually takes two to five years to acquire adequate proficiency to become a mid-level service technician, able to perform quickly the more difficult types diagnosis and repairs. Salary: Automotive technician with 2 to 5 years of experience earned a median salary of $43,046, not including commission. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, median hourly wage-and-salary earnings of automotive service technicians and mechanics, including commission, were $16.88 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $12.44 and $22.64 per hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $9.56, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $28.71 per hour. Median annual wages in the industries employing the largest numbers of service technicians were as follows: * Local government, excluding schools: $20.07 * Automobile dealers: $19.61 * Automotive repair and maintenance: $15.26 * Gasoline stations: $15.22 * Automotive parts, accessories, and tire stores: $14.90 Required Education: For mid-level automotive service technician jobs, employers look for people with strong technical, communication and analytical skills who possess a depth of knowledge about the proprietary systems available on the cars and trucks sold by that dealership. Many experienced technicians employed by automobile dealers and independent repair shops receive a commission related to the labor cost charged to the customer. Under this system, weekly earnings depend on the amount of work completed. Employers frequently guarantee commissioned technicians a minimum weekly salary. Some employees offer health and retirement benefits, but such compensation packages are not universal and can vary widely. The technical skills required of an automotive service technician is no less demanding than understanding any other computer circuitry -- for example, sophisticated Level II on-board computer diagnostics. The same is true for academic skills. Just as in any other technical profession, it is vital that the automotive service technician possess strong reading, writing, communications, and listening, problem-solving, and organizational skills. Constant change in automotive technology requires a technician to have a keen ability to grasp the use of reference information, interpret diagnostic data, and complete logical steps through the repair process A growing number of employers look for completion of a high school/tech prep school program that has been certified by ASE and the completion of a postsecondary associate degree in automotive technology from a local community college (or, in some cases, a manufacturer-authorized postsecondary certificate program that may not include a college degree). Good reading, mathematics, and computer skills are needed to study technical manuals, and to keep abreast of new technology. Automotive technology is rapidly increasing in sophistication, and most training authorities strongly recommend that persons seeking automotive service technician careers complete a certified training program offered at the high school or college level. Transcript: I really like what I'm doing. I have to use my head a lot and I really like that. But yet I use my hands a lot and I really, really like that. Yeah, it's very cool. I've worked here four years. It's a very steady job. There's always work. There's a million Toyota's out there that need to be fixed. We don't specialize here at Toyota like the American manufacturers do. You work on a car bumper to bumper. You do everything from transmissions to tune-ups to electrical diagnosis. You're well rounded as a Toyota technician. Customer wants to know if replace bulbs. There's no notations on that. OK, which bulbs were they? It'd be on the rears. It's something new every day. Something challenging all the time. There's new product coming out every year. To be a good technician you have to be willing to learn new things. And try different things that you've never done before. Because you're going to run into that almost on a daily basis. Diagnosing a problem on a vehicle is the hardest. You have to really understand how a car works in order for you to diagnose the problem. I'm challenged every day by that. It's a different problem or different situation every day. Luckily Toyota-- as a technician you work on a team. And generally a team of four technicians. The master technician, the B technician, the C and the D technician. So if you ever really have a problem you just ask your team leader. It's really nice for the training technician, because he can train on the job. The master tech would be there for support also for diagnosing problems that you can't diagnose. And then for questions. If you have a question on something, if you need help with a certain whatever you're doing he's there to help you. I'm changing the timing belt on this car. We normally recommend them at 60,000 miles. As a technician that I've made more money than I ever thought I would make. I make a real decent living. There's all kinds of incentives to achieve, to get all your ASE certificates, to get all the classes. It just means more money in your pocket. It's real important to fix cars right the first time. I take pride in what I do. You don't want people coming back complaining the same problem they came for originally. It's just a great career. I like it.

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              • President Obama Announces American Graduation Initiative

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                In Michigan, President Obama announces the American Graduation Initiative, a historic investment in our community colleges that will help prepare Americans for the jobs of the 21st century. This plan will help an additional 5 million Americans graduate from community college in the next decade. July 14, 2009. (Public Domain)

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                • Part I: The Future of Higher Education

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                  from James Morrison / Added

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                  On November 18, 2011, Richard Schechter, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Houston Community College, interviewed James Morrison (morrison@unc.edu), Professor Emeritus of Educational Leadership, UNC-Chapel hill on the future of higher education. The video was produced by the HCCTV studio, and is republished here with permission. Part II is at http://vimeo.com/32382286

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                  • The Role of Institutional Agents in Promoting Transfer Access

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                    from Ali Dowd / Added

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                    This video accompanies the article of the same name, by Alicia C. Dowd, Jenny H. Pak, and Estela Mara Bensimon, published in the Education Policy Analysis Archives (http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/) special issue (February 2013) on Democracy's College: Community Colleges in the 21st Century. Acknowledgment: Thank you to contributors at freesound.org for snippets of non-copyrighted musical sounds.

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                    • Fall 2011 INFACTS (Ivy Tech-Northeast)

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                      from Ivy Tech- NE; Inst. Research / Added

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                      A lot happens at Ivy Tech-Northeast that isn’t captured in the typical tables of enrollment trends. Institutional Research staff spent a few hours in the field on the first day of class in Fall 2011 to see how busy and exciting campus can really be. This video was actually created in Prezi (see here: prezi.com/y2avgqpun2fh) and then screencast with Camtasia 5.

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