1. VC October

    02:52:43

    from MiRPAL Network / Added

    0 Plays / / 0 Comments

    MiRPAL Videoconference - 22/Oct/2014

    + More details
    • Medien & Journalismus - Krise oder Konjunktur? - Diskussion - Elevate Festival 2009

      02:51:45

      from Elevate Festival / Added

      Medien & Journalismus - Krise oder Konjunktur? Diskussion @Dom im Berg, Graz, 22.10.2009 David Barstow (New York Times/USA) Raimund Löw (ORF-Brüssel/AT) Anneliese Rohrer (FH Wien/AT) Harald Fidler (DerStandard/AT) Barbara Eppensteiner (Okto.tv/AT) Alexandra Bader (ceiberweiber.at/AT) Moderation: Daniel Erlacher (Elevate/AT) Allerorts brechen die Werbeeinnahmen der Medienunternehmen ein und sorgen für Krisenstimmung. Doch handelt es sich dabei wirklich um eine Medienkrise? Oder steckt nicht vielmehr das Geschäftsmodell des werbefinanzierten Journalismus in der Krise? BloggerInnen, unabhängige JournalistInnen sowie genossenschaftlich finanzierte Medien scheinen jedenfalls von dieser Krise nicht so getroffen zu sein, denn das Informationsbedürfnis der Menschen ist in Krisenzeiten eher gestiegen. Dennoch zeigen aktuelle Statistiken, zum Beispiel in Deutschland, dass das Vertrauen in den Berufsstand deutlich gesunken ist. Nur mehr 35% gaben bei einer aktuellen Umfrage der TU Dresden an, den JournalistInnen zu vertrauen. In Österreich sind die Zahlen noch bedenklicher: Nur 24% der ÖsterreicherInnen vertrauen laut einer Umfrage von Reader's Digest den JournalistInnen. Dass aber international wie auch hierzulande viele mutige JournalistInnen arbeiten und qualitativ hochwertige Inhalte in manchmal spannenden Formaten produzieren, lässt ein wenig Optimismus zu. Innovative Geschäftsmodelle, kollaborative Arbeitsweisen und enormer technologischer Fortschritt bieten ungeahnte Möglichkeiten für engagierte MedienarbeiterInnen. Die TeilnehmerInnen dieser Diskussionsrunde sind allesamt erfahrene und professionelle AkteurInnen bei unterschiedlichen Medien und werden Einblicke in ihre Arbeit, ihr Umfeld und ihre Vision von Journalismus im 21. Jahrhundert geben - mit lokal wie auch globaler Perspektive.

      + More details
      • What is the #Occupy movement?

        02:40:32

        from Platypus Affiliated Society / Added

        603 Plays / / 0 Comments

        A roundtable discussion with students and activists either directly involved with Occupy Wall St. or who are closely following the #Occupy movement. Description: The recent #Occupy protests are driven by discontent with the present state of affairs: glaring economic inequality, dead-end Democratic Party politics, and, for some, the suspicion that capitalism could never produce an equitable society. These concerns are coupled with aspirations for social transformation at an international level. For many, the protests at Wall St. and elsewhere provide an avenue to raise questions the Left has long fallen silent on: What would it mean to challenge capitalism on a global scale? How could we begin to overcome social conditions that adversely affect every part of life? And, how could a new international radical movement address these concerns in practice? Although participants at Occupy Wall St. have managed thus far to organize resources for their own daily needs, legal services, health services, sleeping arrangements, food supplies, defense against police brutality, and a consistent media presence, these pragmatic concerns have taken precedent over long-term goals of the movement. Where can participants of this protest engage in formulating, debating, and questioning the ends of this movement? How can it affect the greater society beyond the occupied spaces? We in the Platypus Affiliated Society ask participants and interested observers of the #Occupy movement to consider the possibility that political disagreement could lead to clarification, further development and direction. Only when we are able create an active culture of thinking and debating on the Left without it proving prematurely divisive can we begin to imagine a Leftist politics adequate to the historical possibilities of our moment. We may not know what these possibilities for transformation are. This is why we think it is imperative to create avenues of engagement that will support these efforts. Towards this goal, Platypus will be hosting a series of roundtable discussions with organizers and participants of the #Occupy movement. These will start at campuses in New York and Chicago but will be moving to other North American cities, and to London, Germany, and Greece in the months to come. We welcome any and all who would like to be a part of this project of self-education and potential rebuilding of the Left to join us in advancing this critical moment. The Platypus Affiliated Society October 2011 ------------------------ Roundtable Participants Phil Arnone is a grad student in NYU's Draper Interdisciplinary Program. He has been active in the anti-war and alter-globalization movements since high school; was an organizer with Students for a Democratic Society and a member of United Students Against Sweatshops while completing his undergraduate studies at the University of Mary Washington, where he was a student organizer for the campus living wage campaign which successfully won a living wage for all University workers in 2006. After college he worked as a boycott organizer for UNITE HERE, the hotel and food service workers union. He has been active in the Occupy Wall St. movement, and is working on linking up existing workers' and immigrants' rights organizations to OWS and connecting the OWS protests to the ongoing struggles throughout the city. Jackrabbit began his political awakening as an anarchist in Philadelphia in the late 80s where he was a squatter and volunteered at the Wooden Shoe infoshop for many years. After hitchhiking across the US and Europe he finally ended up in San Francisco where after many years he would eventually obtain a Bachelor's in International Relations at San Francisco State University. Currently he works at a marketing agency in midtown Manhattan. Jackrabbit is a member of the Politics and Electoral Reform working group at OWS and is also involved with the inter-occupation communication initiative being developed at OWS. Chris Maisano is a public librarian in Brooklyn, rank-and-file activist in DC37 Local 1482, and chair of the NYC local of Democratic Socialists of America and in solidarity with Teamsters art handlers' union at Sotheby's. He is a contributing writer for Jacobin. Maisano is part of the OWS Demands Working Group. Lisa Montanarelli has been active in antiwar protests, community health activism, LGBT rights, and a variety of other causes since the late 1980s. She worked for California Prevention Education Project (Cal-PEP), providing HIV street outreach to people of color, sex workers and homeless youth. After earning her Ph.D. in comparative literature at U.C. Berkeley and teaching college level, she became more deeply involved in community health education—teaching for San Francisco Sex Information, and—as a hepatitis C patient for over 20 years—facilitating workshops for patients and healthcare providers. She co-authored The First Year Hepatitis C: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed and three other non-fiction books. Lisa is a member of the OWS Education and Empowerment and Think Tank Working Groups and helps the Coaching Working Group by interviewing occupiers and blogging at www.visionaries.co. She is also active in the Stop Stop-and-Frisk movement, and through the Interdependence Project. Montanarelli facilitates meditation sessions for OWS at Liberty Plaza. Jordan Morrel has been at Occupy Wall Street for four weeks. At OWS he has served as a facilitator for the General Assembly, and has focused on Sanitation, Mediation, and having conversations with people about such typically taboo subjects as the connections between capitalism and democracy in the United States today, and the radical idea of building society based on respect, not fear, of each other. Jordan grew up in San Francisco, where he was a mental health and substance use counselor, worked at a non-profit volunteer-run collective "Bike Kitchen," and participated in Food Not Bombs, Reclaim the Streets parties, Critical Mass, and other silly activities. He plans to stay in NYC indefinitely. Laura Schleifer created the word 'artivist' to describe her life's purpose as an artist-activist. A NYCbased writer, theater artist, and NYU Tisch grad, her work has spanned the Middle East, where she performed for Palestinian and Iraqi children on a theater/circus tour, to an NGO in Nicaragua, where she taught English through the use of theater, to off-Broadway, where she's performed her sociallyconscious songs and monologues at theaters throughout New York with the Theaters Against War network, and worked with homeless and at-risk youth as an Artist Mentor. She also served as Outreach/Panelist coordinator at this year's Left Forum conference, and and organized and chaired a panel on whether the USA should owe amnesty to undocumented immigrants fleeing from U.S. imperialism. Her original feature screenplay, The Feral Child, was a Sundance Screenwriters Lab finalist, and her short play, Toyz in tha Hood, lead to a NYC arts grant for the First City Theater Co. She also writes for several publications, including Looking Glass Magazine and The Leftist Review. Laura is currently developing a homeless 'survival guide' website at www.wheninneed.org. Schleifer is part of the OWS Alternative Economies Working Group. ***Unless otherwise stated by the participants, their comments today do not necessarily reflect the overall opinion of their respective Working Groups.

        + More details
        • The Four Winds Episode 11 2014

          02:38:04

          from JustThoughtsStudies153 / Added

          4 Plays / / 0 Comments

          The Four winds Episode 11 2014 with your hosts Just Thoughts , Mark13 Records , and Firebrand Ministries Subjects : Let No Man Deceive You . The Two witnesses , and Strong Delusion plus Questions from Viewers - JustThoughtsStudies153 To see more videos like This and and other Bible Studies check out JustThoughtsstudies channels on YouTube.

          + More details
          • What is the #Occupy Movement?: Part II Roundtable Discussion

            02:35:42

            from Platypus Affiliated Society / Added

            666 Plays / / 0 Comments

            What is the #Occupy Movement? A series of roundtable discussions hosted by The Platypus Affiliated Society. This is the second part of the discussion series held in New York City. Speakers: Hannah Appel (OWS Think Tank Working Group), Erik Van Deventer (NYU), Nathan Schneider (Waging Nonviolence), Brian Dominick (Z Media Institute) Held on December 9, 2011 at New York University. The recent #Occupy protests are driven by discontent with the present state of affairs: glaring economic inequality, dead-end Democratic Party politics, and, for some, the suspicion that capitalism could never produce an equitable society. These concerns are coupled with aspirations for social transformation at an international level. For many, the protests at Wall St. and elsewhere provide an avenue to raise questions the Left has long fallen silent on: What would it mean to challenge capitalism on a global scale? How could we begin to overcome social conditions that adversely affect every part of life? And, how could a new international radical movement address these concerns in practice? We in the Platypus Affiliated Society ask participants and interested observers of the #Occupy movement to consider the possibility that political disagreement could lead to clarification, further development and direction. Only when we are able create an active culture of thinking and debating on the Left without it proving prematurely divisive can we begin to imagine a Leftist politics adequate to the historical possibilities of our moment. We may not know what these possibilities for transformation are. This is why we think it is imperative to create avenues of engagement that will support these efforts. Towards this goal, Platypus will be hosting a series of roundtable discussions with organizers and participants of the #Occupy movement. These will start at campuses in New York, Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia but will be moving to other North American cities, and overseas to London, Germany, Greece, India and South Korea in the months to come. We welcome any and all who would like to be a part of this project of self-education and potential rebuilding of the Left to join us in advancing this critical moment. The Platypus Affiliated Society December 2011 Questions Discussants were asked to consider the following questions: 1. In light of the recent series of coordinated and spectacular evictions that took place on November 15th, as well as the international Day of Action that followed two days later, is it fair to say that the #Occupy movement has entered into “phase 2”? If so, what is the nature of this new phase of the movement’s development? How has the occupation been forced to adapt to a changing set of conditions on the ground and what sorts of fresh difficulties do these new conditions pose for the occupiers? A moment of crisis can often be a moment of opportunity—what direction do you feel the movement should take in order to remain viable and relevant? 2. There are striking similarities between the Occupy movement and the 1999 anti-WTO protests in Seattle. Both began in the last year of a Democratic presidency, were spearheaded by anarchists, were motivated by discontents with neo-liberalism, and were supported by organized labor. What, if anything, makes this movement different? How is it a departure from Seattle? What are the lessons to be learned from the defeat of the anti-globalization movement? 3. Some have characterized the #Occupy movement as sounding the tocsin for “class war” (e.g., of the 99% vs. the 1%). Others recognize the fact of dramatic inequality, and want the #Occupy movement to spearhead a set of economic reforms. Others see #Occupy as transforming something revolutionary beyond the “economic”. These perspectives point to radically different directions for this movement. Would you characterize this movement as “anti-capitalist”? (Should it be?) If so, what is the nature of these “anti-capitalist” politics? In what way does the #Occupy movement affirm or reject the political ideas of anti-capitalist movements before it? 4. Some have become wary about the role of labor organizations in the #Occupy movement. Concerns point to the possibility of eventual “co-optation” into Democratic Party politics. Others worry that the “horizontal,” leaderless structure cultivated by the occupiers might be undermined by the decidedly top-down, hierarchical organization of labor unions. Certain of these collaborations, for example between the labor activists and occupiers in Oakland, have been seen as highly fruitful. Still, the broader call for a general strike that some organizers have hoped for has so far not been met. What role should organized labor play in the #Occupy movement? 5. One division that emerged early on among the occupants concerned the need to call for demands. Some took issue with the content of the demands, arguing that if these are to be truly “representative of the 99%” they cannot assume a radical stance that would alienate a large section of the population. Others worry that demands focused on electoral reform or policy would steer the movement in a conservative direction. Some call into the question the call for demands in the first place, as these would limit — even undermine — the open-ended potential for transformation present in the #Occupy movement and could only close revolutionary possibilities. What, if any, demands do you think this movement should be calling for? And, more importantly, what kind of social transformation would you like to see this movement give rise to? 6. What would it mean for the #Occupy movement to succeed? Can it? Roundtable Participants Brian Dominick has nearly 20 years' experience as an activist, organizer, and journalist. In his writing and lecturing, he has largely focused on questions of strategy and tactics for far-reaching social change. Forming and consulting alternative institutions has been a specialty of Brian's, from affinity groups to worker coops to 501(c)(3)s to international activism networks. He is a former co-founder of NewStandard News and instructor at the Z Media Institute. Erik Van Deventer is a doctoral student at NYU in the Department of Sociology, presently working on the political economy of finance. He has been active at OWS and in the demands working group. Hannah Appel earned her Ph.D. in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. With research interests in the daily life of capitalism and the private sector in Africa, in particular, Hannah's work draws on critical development studies, economic anthropology, and political economy. Her current project - Futures - is based on fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork in the transnational oil and gas industry in Equatorial Guinea. Nathan Schneider is an editor for Waging Nonviolence. He writes about religion, reason, and violence for publications including The Nation, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The American Prospect, and others. He is also an editor at Killing the Buddha. ***Unless otherwise stated by the participants, their comments today do not necessarily reflect the overall opinion of their respective Working Groups.

            + More details
            • Redding Start Times 3-8-14

              02:33:22

              from Robert Moran / Added

              40 Plays / / 0 Comments

              A public forum on the proposed changing of hours for John Reed Middle School and Redding Elementary School. This is an important topic that should be viewed by all Redding parents.

              + More details
              • Board of Selectmen Public Hearing on Police Staffing & Expenditures

                02:33:21

                from Robert Moran / Added

                37 Plays / / 0 Comments

                The Redding Board of Selectmen held a public hearing on police staffing and financing at the Redding Community Center on Monday, April 8 @ 7:30PM. People voiced their opinions on both the necessity and cost of the Redding Police Department. Doug Fuchs presented the argument for using a Power Point Presentation to great effect. Important meeting that Reddingites should watch without question.

                + More details
                • Die große Krise und die Zukunft der Menschheit - Diskussion - Elevate Festival 2009

                  02:30:01

                  from Elevate Festival / Added

                  Die große Krise und die Zukunft der Menschheit Diskussion @ Dom im Berg, Graz, 24.10.2009 David Barstow (New York Times/USA) Pat Mooney (ETC Group/CAN) Geoff Tansey (Autor, Publizist, Campaigner/UK) Mona Bricke (Gegenstrom Berlin, Fels, Climate Justice Action/DE) Joachim Hirsch (Politologe, links-netz/DE) Gabriele Michalitsch (Ökonomin und Politologin/AT) Moderation: Christian Felber (Autor und Publizist/AT) Gemeinsam mit einer vielfältigen Auswahl einiger der spannendsten TeilnehmerInnen der vorhergehenden Veranstaltungen zu den zentralen Themenbereichen Klima/Energie, Ökologie, Wirtschaft, Politik, Gesellschaft und Medien wollen wir abschließend noch einmal das große Ganze in den Blick nehmen. Die zu oft isoliert und oberflächlich betrachteten Krisen und ihre Folgen sind unterschiedliche Manifestationen eines großen Zusammenhangs. Es gilt hierzu, ein besseres Verständnis ihrer gemeinsamen Grundlagen und Ursachen, die allesamt in den historisch spezifischen Organisationsformen unserer sozialen, wirtschaftlichen und politischen Systeme sowie in unserem Verhältnis zur Natur liegen, zu entwickeln. In Anbetracht der enormen Herausforderungen, vor denen wir aktuell stehen, widmet sich die Diskussion erneut vor allem auch dem Aufzeigen von wegweisenden Alternativen und innovativen Projekten. Es wird dabei in erster Linie auch darum gehen, wie sich jene zivilgesellschaftlichen Initiativen und sozialen Bewegungen, deren Aktivitäten für unseren Erfolg sehr wahrscheinlich ausschlaggebend sein werden, stärken und vervielfachen lassen. Es benötigt wohl nicht weniger als eine globale Massenbewegung, die die Stärke erreicht, um die Maßnahmen, die den Schutz der Biosphäre und ein lebenswertes Dasein für alle Menschen (inklusive der zukünftigen Generationen) ermöglichen, durchsetzen zu können. Ist eine solche Bewegung bereits im Entscheiden? Welche Konflikte werden die nächsten Jahre und Jahrzehnte prägen? Wie wird sich die Welt verändern? Welche Chancen gibt es für die Realisierung einer solidarischeren, demokratischeren und nachhaltigeren Gesellschaft? Wie kann eine andere Wirtschaft aussehen? Wird sich die Klimakrise bewältigen lassen? Hat die Menschheit eine Zukunft?

                  + More details
                  • Marcel Broodthaers et le musée

                    02:29:52

                    from erg / Added

                    1,010 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    "Marcel Broodthaers et le musée" Discussion avec Jean-Philippe Antoine (auteur de "La traversée du XXe siècle. Joseph Beuys, l’image et le souvenir" et "Marcel Broodthaers – Moule, Muse, Méduse"), Thierry de Duve (co-fondateur de l’erg, spécialiste des résonances du ready-made duchampien et auteur de nombreux ouvrages dont "Faire école (ou la refaire ?)"), Dirk Snauwaert (directeur du WIELS, Bruxelles et auteur d’une thèse et de nombreux textes sur Marcel Broodthaers) et Corinne Diserens (directrice de l’erg et commissaire de la rétrospective Marcel Broodthaers au Palais des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles, 2001) .

                    + More details
                    • Архитектура Среща...изкуство

                      02:25:27

                      from dontDIY / Added

                      158 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Архитектура Среща...изкуство дата: 18/12/2013 къде: студио проjектиране кой: dontDIY, Владия Михайлова, студио проjектиране модератори: Христо Станкушев, Владия Михайлова участници: проф.Валентин Старчев, Веселина Сариева (фондация Отворени Изкуства), арх.Владислав Костадинов (студио 8 1/2), арх.Георги Кътов (i/o archиtects), Мария Василева (СГХГ), Недко Сoлаков, Стефан Гаджовски (Suspacious)

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."