1. Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe, Norma Jean Sings

    11:50

    from GreenMugger / Added

    101 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Part 1 (0-4:33) and Part 2 (4:33-11:51) “A side of Marilyn never expressed before!” said Joe Franklin, longtime New York showbiz maven on Bloomberg Radio. “The show is phenomenal! Best one-person performance I have ever seen!” said Ted Kavanau, Founding Senior Producer of CNN television network. And Elizabeth Gilbert, author of “Eat. Pray. Love.” said “The talented and beautiful Louisa Bradshaw is Pure Radiance as Marilyn. I loved her in this show.” In our recent Off Broadway, one-woman musical (w/ pianist), now titled The Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe (Norma Jean Sings), women over 30 especially loved our Marilyn - or our happier vision of an older, wiser but still gorgeous Norma Jean. She’s still alive, you see, after 51 not-so-bad years in Purgatory (“Celestial Rehab,” she calls it) and she tells the story of how she’s become the much happier and fulfilled, less haunted woman she always wanted to be (but never could while trapped like a mummy inside the Golden Mask of Marilyn Monroe). She’s continued her studies of herself and her era - and her craft. She thinks she’s a better actress now, and she begins with a loving re-creation of her raging Mother in the Institution (who actually manages to forgive her wayward daughter.) And Norma Jean’s definitely a more full-throated singer now; Purgatory has opened up her voice as well as her personality. The play’s through-line is her looking back on her storied life with a new understanding and compassion. And she talks and sings about other stars she sees now as “relatives” almost as much as she does herself – Elvis, for one (“I’ll be so lonely, baby/ I’ll be so lonely I could die”) as well as Judy Garland, George Sanders, Rita Hayworth, even Marlene Dietrich. (Norma Jeanne does a mean “Black Market”). She also sings about her star ideals – Doris Day (“Love Me or Leave Me”) and Ella Fitzgerald (Did you know that Marilyn Monroe “integrated Hollywood”? She got Ella a gig at the formerly segregated Mocambo Club?) Perhaps the key through-line is her dawning discovery of her True Audience – in the theatre. While making movies, she was notoriously difficult to work with, and she realizes now the reason was she couldn’t see the audience – “except for the angry audience in my dizzy head.” And so she keeps remembering her greatest happiness in her brief life: her only appearance before a Live Audience. Those 17,000 GI’s in Korea somehow made her feel at home for once in her life, like she was Their Girl Next Door. I hope you’ll view some excellent samples of our star Louisa Bradshaw’s fabulous performance of this fable – and Lissa Moira’s wonderful direction -at “See Our Marilyn Monroe 2" on YouTube. (It was amazing to see how she and Gregory Nissen, our musical director, held an audience, just chatting and singing. A shorter ad (4 min.) is now called “Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe.” (They loved the show but didn’t get our original title, “Siren’s Heart.”) Three of Norma Jean’s original songs are based on poems by her new favorite poet, W. B. Yeats: “The Mask” becomes a sexy vogue (great choreography): “Oh do not ask what is behind the mask/ It was the mask that first engaged your mind” (with a more somber reprise I’d like to add); “For Anne Gregory” becomes a belting “Love Is Blond Blues”, and “Brown Penny” becomes a “French song” she sings as Yves Montand sang to her during their “glorious” affair (“O love’s a very crooked thing/ there’s no one wise enough . . .”). Other originals are her Opener, “Looking At Her”, a mystical samba in which she imagines herself as at once the Goddess and as one of Her countless Worshippers; her torch song to Arthur Miller (and Joe Dimaggio, who loved her most), “If You Could See Me As I Am (but you can’t see me for your Fantasy); a mournful lullaby for the Child She Lost, based on Hopkins’ “Margaret Are You Grieving/ Over Goldengrove Unleaving? (Fall is love/ May Love follow you.”) And that NYC crowd pleaser, our star’s own “Shiksa Strip:” I know it wasn’t your decision/ but I just love your circumcision.” She also “quotes” from her Fifties Favorites; Nat King Cole’s “Mona Lisa” especially spoke to her: “Are you warm/ are you real, Mona Lisa?/ Or just a cold and lonely , lovely work of art?” Not the usual sad biopic about her, The Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe is a very different, more joyful take on Marilyn - and Her Legend. In our play’s Purgatory, Norma Jean does indeed “raise her consciousness,” surmount her personal demons and Discover Her True Audience - in the Theatre. It’s a play about the Second Chance we all wish we had; it’s about the Marilyn Who Might Have Been. Walt Stepp 111 4th Ave.-7F New York, NY 10003 P.S. No conspiracy theories about her death or affairs with the Kennedys in this narrative.

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    • Elizabeth Gilbert @ 5x15

      19:38

      from 5x15 / Added

      212 Plays / / 0 Comments

      27th April 2014, Wilton's Music Hall Elizabeth Gilbert is the acclaimed author of five books of fiction and non-fiction. She attended New York University, where she studied political science by day and worked on her short stories by night. She is best known for her 2006 bestseller Eat, Pray, Love, which has sold over ten million copies worldwide and was adapted into a film. Her short story collection Pilgrims was nominated for the PEN/Hemingway Award, her novel Stern Men was a New York Times Notable Book and The Last American Man, her biography of Eustace Conway, was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her 2010 book Committed was a Number One New York Times bestseller. She was nominated for the Wellcome Book Prize 2014 for her novel The Signature of All Things. It is a big novel about a big century, soaring across the globe from London, to Peru, to Philadelphia, to Tahiti, to Amsterdam. Peopled with extraordinary characters – missionaries, abolitionists, adventurers, astronomers, sea captains, geniuses and the quite mad – most of all it has an unforgettable heroine in Alma Whittaker, a woman of the Enlightened Age who stands defiantly on the cusp of the modern.

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      • Elizabeth Gilbert - Your Elusive Creative Genius (Animated)

        00:54

        from David / Added

        109 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Here's a short animation of the TED talk "Your Elusive Creative Genius" by Elizabeth Gilbert. It's only a minute long, but the original talk is somewhere around 18 minutes.

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        • "Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe" starring Louisa Bradshaw

          04:32

          from GreenMugger / Added

          1,134 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe (Formerly Siren's Heart) - written and original songs by Walt Stepp. Louisa Bradshaw - as Norma Jean and Marilyn Monroe. Lissa Moira - Director Gregory Nissen - Music Director Donald Garverick - Choreographer J. Alan Hanna - Video Director Reviews:-------- "The Best One-Person Performance I've Ever Seen! Louisa Bradshaw is a Sensation! The show is phenomenal!" - Ted Kavanau, Founding Senior Producer of the CNN television network. "A side of Marilyn never expressed before, Walt Stepp's 'Siren's Heart' excites! Louisa Bradshaw is riveting! Lissa Moira's direction is stunning!" - Joe Franklin, Bloomberg Radio "The beautiful and talented Louisa Bradshaw is Pure Radiance as Marilyn. I loved her in this show!" - Elizabeth Gilbert, Author of "Eat. Pray.Love" Description "Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe" (formerly "Siren's Heart") In our recent Off Boadway one-gal musicale (with pianist), ladies over 30 especially loved our Marilyn - or was it our vision of an older, wiser and much happier Norma Jean, still gorgeous 51 years after her supposed death. She's still alive, you see, in Purgatory - which is not as bad as you've heard .(She calls it "Celestial Rehab.") And now we find Norma Jean as the far more fulfilled,far less haunted woman she always longed to be - but never could while trapped like a mummy beneathe the Golden Mask of Marilyn Monroe. She's continued her studies to become a "serious" actress (she begins with a loving portrayal of her mad mother, who at last forgives her wayward daughter) and she's definitely a better singer, as Purgatory has helped open her voice as well as her personality. The play's main through-line is Norma Jean looking back on her storied life as Marilyn with a new compassion and understanding. Not only her own life but the many stars she can now empathize with, including Elvis and Judy and George Sands and Doris Day, even Marlene Dietrich. You can see longer examples of our star Louisa Bradshaw's fabulous performance of this fable at "See Our Marilyn Monroe 2" on YouTube. She sings a torch song to Arthur Miller (and Joe DiMaggio), "If You Could See Me As I Am" (but you can't see me for your Dream) ; a very sexy rendition of Yeats's "The Mask" ("It was the mask that first engaged your mind") and check out that choreography - as well as on "Norma Jean's Lament" ("Oh God I gotta be this goddess to them all/ but I'm really not the one they want at all." Watch her belt out "Love Is Blond Blues" and she has a lot of fun with Louisa's own "Shiksa Strip" ("I know it wasn't your decision/ but I just love your circumcision.") And about the Child She Lost, she sings a classic mourning poem by Hopkins, "Margaret, Are You Grieving/ Over Goldengrove Unleaving. . . .Fall Is Love. May Love Follow You." Currently, I'm writing new dialogue to emphasize what I think may be the main reason Marilyn Monroe is "still alive" 51 years later - her ironic role as the First Feminist of the Postwar Era. Her nude calendar in 1952 sent such shock waves through our culture mainly because she refused to deny it and openly joked about it ("Nothing on but the radio"). She was the first to rebel against her "fundamentalist" background in 1952, and it was the message millions in an increasingly "fundamentalist" culture were dying to hear The iconic blowing white dress photo also lives on forever because it so beautifully depicts a woman delighting in her own sexuality. There's been nothing like it before or since. "The Musical Memoirs of Marilyn Monroe (Norma Jean Sings)" tries to be truer than the usual biopic to that larger vision of Marilyn Monroe. My co-creators of this show, which ran over a year at the Actors Temple Theatre in Manhattan, were Lissa Moira our director and of course Louisa Bradshaw, our star. Walt Stepp P.S. And did you know that Marilyn was the first to singlehandedly "integrate Hollywood" - when the club scene was still as segregated as it was in Biloxi, Mississippi? True story; the first thing she did with her new fame in 1954 was to use it to get Ella Fitzgerald hired at the Mocambo Club (Spoto 332-3). Just another fact to suggest that Norma Jean was an incipient reformer. She might have become an activist for civil rights - or even women's rights - had "Marilyn Monroe" not taken over her life.

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          • The Signature of All Things -- Official Book Trailer

            03:20

            from Viking Books / Added

            239 Plays / / 1 Comment

            ON SALE: OCTOBER 1, 2013 Elizabeth Gilbert’s first novel in twelve years is an extraordinary story of botany, exploration and desire, spanning across much of the 19th century. For more information visit: http://www.elizabethgilbert.com/

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            • ITS Book Club Picks: Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert video book review

              00:55

              from In the Stacks video book review / Added

              4 Plays / / 0 Comments

              A video book review of Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert. One of the top picks from ITS librarians for your book club to read.

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              • LIVE Shorts: JOHN HODGMAN in conversation with ELIZABETH GILBERT

                04:27

                from LIVE from the NYPL / Added

                39 Plays / / 0 Comments

                John Hodgman interviews Elizabeth Gilbert on the occasion of the re-release of her grandmother's cookbook, which she describes as "more Dorothy Parker than Betty Crocker".

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                • THE POWER OF PROPHECY VOL 1-2

                  08:49

                  from Phone Prophecy / Added

                  11 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Sarah Burleton, David Allen, Katrina Smith, Lawrence Polsky, Tania Ahsan, Rhonda Byrne, Lee Pryor, Susan Cain, Daniel H. Pink, Timothy Ferriss, Kyle Richards, Napoleon Hill, David Tuffley, Arnold Bennett, Matt Patterson, Mike Dow, Scott Adams, Arthur B. Markman, Eric Watterson, Elizabeth Gilbert, Eckhart Tolle, John Pryor, Melody Beattie, Peter Taylor, Francine Jay, Cheryl Shireman, Howard Fast,

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                  • THE GATEKEPPERS OF SECRETS VOL 1-2

                    08:50

                    from Phone Prophecy / Added

                    12 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Sarah Burleton, David Allen, Katrina Smith, Lawrence Polsky, Tania Ahsan, Rhonda Byrne, Lee Pryor, Susan Cain, Daniel H. Pink, Timothy Ferriss, Kyle Richards, Napoleon Hill, David Tuffley, Arnold Bennett, Matt Patterson, Mike Dow, Scott Adams, Arthur B. Markman, Eric Watterson, Elizabeth Gilbert, Eckhart Tolle, John Pryor, Melody Beattie, Peter Taylor, Francine Jay, Cheryl Shireman, Howard Fast,

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                    • THE POWER OF PROPHECY VOL 1-2

                      08:49

                      from ProphesyLeadership / Added

                      12 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Sarah Burleton, David Allen, Katrina Smith, Lawrence Polsky, Tania Ahsan, Rhonda Byrne, Lee Pryor, Susan Cain, Daniel H. Pink, Timothy Ferriss, Kyle Richards, Napoleon Hill, David Tuffley, Arnold Bennett, Matt Patterson, Mike Dow, Scott Adams, Arthur B. Markman, Eric Watterson, Elizabeth Gilbert, Eckhart Tolle, John Pryor, Melody Beattie, Peter Taylor, Francine Jay, Cheryl Shireman, Howard Fast,

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