1. The StrykeZone - Episode 32 (Season 3 Finale)

    36:30

    from CJ Stryker / Added

    86 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Air Date - Wednesday December 31, 2014 NOTE: I want to thank Joey "Quest" Valeriano and Mimi Carey for dedicating an amazing video to me. CJ makes his decision regarding the future of The StrykeZone. He has Gary Hill on the show. Former guests make special appearances and a discussion is had on why gay guys are attracted to arrogant guys. CJ also takes you back in time a little bit.

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    • The StrykeZone - Episode 32 (Season 3 Finale) Commercial

      00:54

      from Stryker Network Media / Added

      97 Plays / / 0 Comments

      The StrykeZone Episode 32 (Season 3 Finale) will air on Wednesday December 31, 2014 (New Years Eve) What will CJ Stryker's decision be? Also he will have a discussion on why gay guys are attracted to arrogant gay guys.

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      • "Soundings" - Gary Hill Master Copy

        04:23

        from Deepti Menon / Added

        14 Plays / / 0 Comments

        A master copy of Gary Hill's piece "Soundings"

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        • URA ARU, 1985-86

          28:31

          from Gary Hill Studio / Added

          Video (color, sound); 28:00 min. Recorded on location in Japan, this work was inspired by the notion of “acoustic palindromes,” aural versions of written palindromes, located in the Japanese language. Hill creates this palindromic world as a site for excavation, uncovering new meanings and images by focusing on reversals and double reversals of spoken words and analogous actions. What ultimately can be seen as an inter-textual weaving of language, image, and time (or what Hill calls, “origami time”) exposes the archetypal protagonists of Noh drama: god, man, woman, lunatic, demon. These dramatis personae appear in and around a series of conceptual vignettes based on the Noh play Lady Aoi. Traditionally represented by a folded kimono at the front of the stage, Lady Aoi is the tale of a sickly court lady, one of Genji’s wives, whose jealousy becomes demonic and must be exorcised for her spirit to rest in the nether world. The Noh scenes become a subtext, mirroring, shifting, and juxtaposing their relationship to the exterior play of characters and culturally idiomatic images of Japan. The work is structured as a sequence of tableaus, each one moving bi-directionally (video plays forwards and backwards) sometimes changing directions more than once. Words and phrases multiply in the “palindromic space” and are further extended by English texts animated and embedded in the images. Electronically generated, they function as a kind of open-ended transliteration, conjuring up word plays and further palindromes that resonate with the spoken Japanese as literally heard, yet are alien to the “natural” order of language as understood by a native Japanese. Quasha, George and Charles Stein. An Art of Limina: Gary Hill’s Works and Writings. Barcelona: Ediciones Polígrafa, 2009, p. 597.

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          • RESOLUTION, 1979

            01:51

            from Gary Hill Studio / Added

            Video (black-and-white, silent); 1:30 min. Black-and-white camera, turntable, and Dave Jones prototype modules (input amplifier, video comparator/border generator, output amplifier) A single solid white line rotates 180 degrees, beginning at a vertical position in the middle of the screen. At first, it forms “stair-steps,” and then, approaching horizontality, it intermittently breaks up, literally between the (scan) lines. Continuing, the line reconstitutes itself as it reaches its initial vertical position. “The idea was to focus on the moment that the line passed through the horizontal position—coming to and going from, literally, a space between the lines. Given that the video signal consists of 525 lines per frame, the line (white on black) passes through a kind of liminal moment in which it is “deciding” which line will be scanning it and thus ambivalently creates an intermittent line, a momentary unruly dotted line, as it passes through the horizontal position. This was telling me in some way that there was a kind of hidden space that might be an ingress for language. This was the opposite of what I might naturally think about an electronic signal and language. In other words, the electronic signal always seemed like a sub-particle in relation to language, which by comparison is rather bulky and time-consuming to think, speak, receive, and comprehend. So the only way to get between the lines and deal with this liminality seemed to be some kind of textuality.” Excerpted from “Introduction: Electronic Linguistics” in George Quasha and Charles Stein’s An Art of Limina: Gary Hill’s Works and Writings. Barcelona: Ediciones Polígrafa, 2009.

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            • Rock City Road, 1974-75

              12:34

              from Gary Hill Studio / Added

              Video (color and black-and-white, silent); 16:00 min. Three black-and-white video cameras, reel-to-reel video tape recorder, Eric Siegel colorizer, and unknown broken keyer/video mixer Recorded in Woodstock, New York, Rock City Road incorporates multiple levels of rescanned images of walking on different surfaces, including pavement and snow-covered terrain. The images have been rescanned and manipulated using reel-to-reel videotape recorders. Editing actions—fast forward, reverse, pause, as well as “scratching” through and between frames—remain present as the sounds they make. Noises inherent to the medium, they function as metaphoric links between the texture/materiality of the world and that of electronic media. Quasha, George and Charles Stein. An Art of Limina: Gary Hill’s Works and Writings. Barcelona: Ediciones Polígrafa, 2009, p. 590.

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              • Primarily Speaking, 1981-83

                19:36

                from Gary Hill Studio / Added

                Video (color, stereo sound); 18:40 min. This work is the single-channel version of a multi-channel installation of the same name. The picture plane is divided into a left and a right half. A changing background is formed by colorful, highly graphic patterns reminiscent of TV test signals and various monochrome surfaces. Two smaller rectangles appear on the surface, in which video sequences are running. The two image strands show landscapes, interiors, objects, graphical images and text that are sometimes used in contrast, and on other occasions the same image can be seen mirrored in each rectangle. They are accompanied by Hill’s recitation of a long text, whose syllabic sequence determines the rhythm of the images (the screen changes with each uttered syllable). His voice comes alternately out of the left and right stereo channels functioning like a dialogue. This is broken into sections by a singing, but electronically altered, voice. The text, constructed for the most part from idiomatic expressions, extends the themes seen in Around & About, 1980. In both works, the artist is concerned with disclosing and deciphering the codes of human relations. The desire for a community through language comes very much to the fore, while the constantly changing images attempt to compete. Broeker, Holger, ed. Gary Hill: Selected Works and catalogue raisonné. Wolfsburg: Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, 2002, GHCR 47, pp. 105 – 110.

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                • Mirror Road, 1976

                  06:24

                  from Gary Hill Studio / Added

                  Video (color); 8:00 min. Black-and-white videotape recordings, video player, Dave Jones colorizer, and Javelin time-lapse videotape recorder “Mirror Road is one of the few works I made at the Experimental Television Center [in Owego, New York], where I utilized the Dave Jones colorizer. I was looking to interweave two ideas: the movement of the landscape looking out a car window, particularly when turning and/or framing the rearview mirror as part of the picture plane, and manipulating the quantized levels/colors of the image gradations—that is, as the image pulls apart directionally there’s a kind of tearing of the shades of gray (colorized to further articulate the contours). The original video recordings were slowed down on a special reel-to-reel time-lapse video tape recorder, an early technology that had a peculiar side effect of creating slight wave-like motions, as if the screen were imperceptibly wavering in the wind, thus furthering the sense of the image about to tear or give way.” In Mirror Road, Hill uses the camera and image processing devices to explore the malleability of electronic colors and image density. Amorphous structures move across the monitor like drifting clouds, changing color and direction. From time to time structures of fantastic color landscapes move past one another in the lower and upper halves of the picture (the rearview mirror takes up the upper half of the frame), only to be recombined into an amorphous unity. Quasha, George and Charles Stein. An Art of Limina: Gary Hill’s Works and Writings. Barcelona: Ediciones Polígrafa, 2009, p. 585.

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                  • MESH, 1976

                    01:49

                    from Gary Hill Studio / Added

                    Video (color, sound); 1:40 min. A fixed color camera is slightly defocused on the wire mesh of a window screen. Outside the window the leaves of trees are moving with the wind. The images, about one-half second each, are edited directly to the master tape at intervals based on the set-up time of each edit. The sound is of the room itself, which is, for the most part, the editing button being pushed down for each edit. With each edit the wire mesh and background colors shift slightly. The work is about ‘meshing’ time and view. Broeker, Holger, ed. Gary Hill: Selected Works and catalogue raisonné. Wolfsburg: Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, 2002, GHCR 17, p. 65.

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                    • Objects with Destinations, 1979

                      03:53

                      from Gary Hill Studio / Added

                      Video (color, silent); 3:40 min. Three black-and-white video cameras and Dave Jones prototype modules (analog-to-digital converter, digital-to-analog converter, bit switch, frame buffer, comparators with outline generators, variable hard/soft keyers, color field generators, output amplifier) Objects from the artist’s studio (hammer, cathode ray tube, circuit board rack, chair, clip light) constitute the subjects for a series of short sequences in which a single object moves through a series of overlapping transformations. These are electronically altered in such a way that their coloration and contours continuously morph. As the transparent images are superimposed one upon the other and faded in and out, they become slightly displaced, giving the impression that the objects are “wandering” across the image plane. In some sequences, the contours and colors of the objects dissociate, or newly arising color fields spread across the pictorial surface. The superimpositions and cross-dissolves result in a minimal amount of action, consistent with the ‘destinations’ implied in the work’s title. As in Mirror Road, Bathing, and Windows, the artist uses images of everyday objects together with image processing devices to explore the malleability of electronic colors and image density. Gary Hill has said of this work, “Following Windows, I was still looking for a vehicle to make sense out of a substantial number of circuits I’d spent way too many hours building with Dave Jones’ oversight. ‘Real time’ seemed so integral to the process that the actual image/object was almost a by-product—very much secondary to the ‘verb’ of transformation taking place ‘between.’ The focus was on what was happening; what kind of manipulation/processing took the pixels from one representation to another. As in so many cases, using what was at hand—what was around me—was the only way to keep it ‘live.’” Quasha, George and Charles Stein. An Art of Limina: Gary Hill’s Works and Writings. Barcelona: Ediciones Polígrafa, 2009, p. 587.

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