1. Great Kids Up Close Season 3 Episode 4

    35:02

    from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

    In this episode of Great Kids Up Close: - A behind the scene look at Culinary Arts at Edmondson-Westside High School - A student makes a healthy snack - Students head to the Great Kids Farm for a food summit - Port Fest events at Fells Point and the NS Savannah - Middle school students begin work on a documentary - A book cover designer comes to MICA - Students from the three carpentry schools kick-off a rehab project in Pigtown - Students learn how to communicate through movement

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    • Make a comeback at Career Academy

      02:45

      from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

      Career Academy, one of Baltimore City Public School's alternative option programs, offers students who are under-credit or over-age a chance to make-up classes and graduate. Through partnerships with Job Corps, the Mayors Office of Employment Development and Baltimore City Community College, students are able to get their lives back on the right track. "This is a unique school," explains principal Gus Herrington. "The people who work here are caring. We nurture students, we mentor students, we support students in every way we can. Class sizes are small. We have rigorous instruction here and we challenge students. At the end of the day, we prepare them for college, careers and the 21st century." "It's a very good environment," said Kevin, a student. "They really interact with all the students. They help you and get to you and help you with your personal needs." One of the strongest parts of Career Academy is the partnership with Job Corps. They help students in their career paths, get certification in Microsoft Office, internet literacy, and job placements. "My experience here at Career Academy has been great," said Kachaler, a graduate of Career Academy. "My first semester I made up all my classes from 10th and 11th grade. If I can make up the classes in a nine month period then I can do anything."

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      • Follow students as they create a documentary

        02:18

        from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

        Check out the first video in an ongoing series that will highlight the process students ages 10-15 go through to create a documentary about a topic relevant to them. Students brainstorm ideas, narrow down the list, and make a push to see what topic they will focus their lens on. In addition to making a documentary, the students will gain media literacy, team building, public speaking, community service, and digital media skills.

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        • Great Kids Up Close Season 3 Episode 3

          41:02

          from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

          In this episode of Great Kids Up Close: BSA students help build Habitat for Humanity house Digital Harbor students plant a garden with the help of partners Frederick Douglass kicks off program for student-athletes Zoo welcomes thousands of students for Pre-k at Play Pre-k students visit a high school for Pre-k at Play Thomas Johnson Elementary/Middle School students discuss anti-bullying strategies Students from Digital Harbor and The Green School help replenish oyster populations in the Chesapeake Bay Students at Gilmore Elementary discuss bullying

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          • Great Kids Up Close Season 3 Episode 1

            33:22

            from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

            In this episode of Great Kids Up Close: Students get a summer passport to the city Students take summer AP prep biology course Summer work at the smoothie shack! Students take summer AP prep calculus course John Ruhrah students get a new playground Students take summer AP Spanish course College Bound awards City Schools graduates with college scholarship Summer Jump: Read to Succeed at Walter P. Carter Elementary Summer Jump: Robotics championships at Coppin State University Middle school students gear up for their future YouthWorks students help ACCE plant a garden

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            • Students from Digital Harbor replenish the oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay

              02:53

              from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

              Oysters play a vital role in the health of the Chesapeake Bay, but in recent years, declining oyster populations have had a dramatic impact on the Bay's overall health. Two schools -- The Green School of Baltimore and Digital Harbor High School have been actively working over the last year to help replenish oyster populations. Students created special oyster sanctuaries to protect the oysters and placed them in the waters around the Inner Harbor. "They're called oyster spats -- which are baby oysters and they're all on the dead oyster shells and that's their habitat," says Leslie, a Digital Harbor High School student. "Oysters filter the water in the Bay and that's really important because it helps the ecosystem a lot," says Ellie, a student at The Green School of Baltimore. "They also provide habitats for other animals when they build their reefs." Students are helping to make the waters of the inner harbor swimmable by the year 2020. They are joined in their efforts by The Chesapeake Bay Foundation. "One of the reasons why we focus on oysters is because they are very effective filters. One adult oyster can filter 50 gallons of water in one day," says John Rodenhausen, the Maryland Director of Development at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. John is working with local business partners around the inner harbor to plant 75 oyster sanctuaries. Ellie says, "Were hoping that if people are more informed about what oysters do for the bay, they'll be more aware of what they are doing to help them and what they should stop doing."

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              • Hilton Elementary builds a new playground, greenhouse, and a garden

                02:02

                from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

                As students worked inside their classrooms at Hilton Elementary School, hundreds of volunteers were also hard at work right outside the building. “I feel great that they are helping us become a better school,” said Ebubedike, a 3rd grader at Hilton Elementary School. Ebubedike and other students came out to watch and help volunteers as they transformed the space outside. They installed a greenhouse, planted a garden and assembled playground equipment. “We are so excited and very grateful,” said managing assistant principal Danielle Henson. “We are striving to become a green school so having these enhancements added to our garden helps us.” The event was organized and sponsored by the National Dairy Council, United Way and the NFL as a way to kick off the school year and the 2013-14 football season. Former Ravens players Jamal Lewis and Duane Starks also lent a hand. “This is a great opportunity to come back and give to Hilton and make sure the students are eating healthy and have a nice fitness and health program,” said Starks. Hilton Elementary School participates in the Fuel Up to Play 60, a health and wellness program by the NFL and National Dairy Council.

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                • Anti-Bullying Event at Thomas Johnson Elementary School

                  03:29

                  from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

                  For National Bullying Prevention Awareness month, students and teachers at Thomas Johnson Elementary Middle school created a short video about the importance of bullying prevention and how it affects their peers. Each student had the opportunity to participate in the video, and express themselves about the affects of bullying. “It’s important not to bully, because if you bully someone you can really hurt their feelings,” says Tahlik an eighth grade student. Students were excited to see themselves and their peers on screen. The school’s social worker, Megan Hartings and psychologist Greg Wiatrowski came up with the idea, wanting to approach the topic in a different way than in previous years. They created the video in hopes that, in hearing and seeing their peers talk about bullying; it would foster a conversation that they haven’t been able to have in the past. After the video screening, a discussion was held covering the four types of bullying including emotional, verbal, physical and cyber bullying. Ways to identify bullying, preventing it and speaking up about it were also discussed. “Some of their answers were very heartfelt and you can that they are listening,” says Greg Wiatrowski who was delighted to see the students’ response to the project. “I’ve never experienced bullying personally but I’ve seen somebody being bullied and it’s not very nice. I don’t want it to happen to me or other kids in this school,” says Jake a student.

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                  • Reading Day at Gilmor Elementary School

                    03:59

                    from Baltimore City Public Schools / Added

                    “I learned that even when you’re getting bullied, you don’t have to deal with it alone,” says Maya a student at Gilmor Elementary School. In honor of Michael Carter, former director of Family & Community Engagement, Gilmor Elementary School was invited, along with numerous city schools, to participate in Michael Carter’s Men’s’ Reading Day. For this special event, several outstanding gentlemen from the community were invited to come read to students. “We really don’t know the effect that our words have on other people,” one of the volunteers said to students while discussing the chosen book, “Khalil’s Way” by David Miller, a story about a young boy and his tough experiences with bullying at school. “I learned that you always have to speak up when somebody’s bullying you,” says Kayla a student. Fourth and fifth grade students engaged with the reading volunteers in discussions about bullying and the importance of holding one another accountable for their actions. “Our kids need to see more African American males in the schools in general in Baltimore City that are doing positive things,” says Brian Henderson a reading volunteer. “Just seeing African American men reading to them just showcases that reading is important, that men are important in our schools and that African American men care just as much as anyone else about schools and education,” says Monique Armstrong, Family & Community Engagement Specialist.

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