1. ANDREW BARRON, Water Coordinator

    05:54

    from Jon Goldman / Added

    59 Plays / / 0 Comments

    We went to Thibodaux, Louisiana to Nicholls State University where we met Andrew Barron at the Barataria•Terrebonne National Estuarine Program (BTNEP). Both and his colleague Dean Blanchard (not the Shrimp broker from Grand Isle) spoke to us about the decimation of the marshlands of Southern Louisiana, by the oil industry's cutting of canals and the group's advocacy for reparations of this vital national resource. Andrew is of Cajun ancestry, has a vast knowledge of hydrological systems of the Deltaic region of the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya River basins and is passionate about the need for the rest of the country to understand the interconnected nature of river systems and their fragile states. "The question is: is that accounting system--that perception of the value of these wetlands--is that going to change fast enough to make effective restoration. Because we do need a societal change, not just a few individuals here and there...." Under the effective leadership of Kerry St Pe, BTNEP is on the front lines of this battle, advocating for more funding for coastal restoration in a place so fragile it is known as the fastest disappearing landscape in America. In the short span of seventy years, man has destroyed what took nature 7,000 years to build. Today, they are pleading for the nation to repay a debt to a place that has lost their home which they sacrificed for the growth of the country. Now, with the impending "extinction event" they are even more desperate.

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    • BP's $30 billion Gulf hangover

      01:03

      from The Deal / Added

      BP plc will face Gulf-related claims in the $30 billion range over the next three years, according to an estimate from Grant Thornton LLP. Loretta Cross, a managing partner at Grant Thornton, says the company has plenty of options to cover the costs. - Suzanne Stevens

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      • Charge to the IOM - Nicole Lurie

        07:45

        from The National Academies / Added

        62 Plays / / 0 Comments

        On June 22nd and 23rd, the IOM hosted Assessing the Human Health Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: An Institute of Medicine Workshop in New Orleans, LA. During the first day's sessions, speakers and panelists discussed the potential adverse health effects for humans stemming from the oil spill for various populations. The second day’s sessions explored current monitoring activities, the types of research methods and data sources currently available, and questions to consider when developing short- and long-term surveillance and monitoring systems.

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        • CLARICE FRILOUX, Grand Bois, Louisiana

          06:13

          from Jon Goldman / Added

          134 Plays / / 0 Comments

          We met Clarice Friloux through my cousin, Maxx Sizeler and her former partner, Bea Calvert. Bea's mother, Mercedes Calvert, was an interview we conducted in Metarie, Lousiana, and she had said we should really talk to her niece who had led a fight against an oil company and won. The case, for obvious reasons, drew a lot of attention nationwide. She is from the Houma Tribe of Native Peoples and has openly fought to have the waste of the oil industry dealt with, primarily because it is often dumped in her backyard. Literally. In open pits which have become aeromatic causing respiratory issues like asthma, bloody sinus conditions and making people in her community sick. She ultimately settled out of court with the oil company about ten years ago, where they were required to build berms around the site, and eventually cap it. Ten years have passed and nothing has changed. People are still getting sick. And potentially (if the winds are right) a gigantic oil spill will be headed right in her direction with no protection or natural buffer because the same oil companies have dug many canals rendering any natural possible hydrological exchange impossible. These canals and pipelines have decimated the marshland. What was once, according to Mercedes, endless brackish marsh with no glimpse of the Gulf, is now all salt water for as far as the eye can see. All because of the fourth element in the manufacture of oil: transportation ( The other elements being extraction, marketing and storage.) please watch the posted video....

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          • Engaging the Public, Protecting Health

            20:06

            from The National Academies / Added

            69 Plays / / 0 Comments

            David Abramson, Columbia University, speaks on communicating health risks to diverse groups of people.

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            • Gary Cure, Shell Beach, Louisiana

              04:34

              from Jon Goldman / Added

              99 Plays / / 0 Comments

              We met Gary Cure onboard the Donna Ann. He is an affable fellow, a hard working oysterman who looks to BP to make thing right. He also looks to that oil company to employ him again as a worker on the spill because it is the only thing bringing in anything. It is the waiting though that is making him uncomfortable.

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              • George Barisch on The Fishing Life

                01:57

                from TakePart / Added

                181 Plays / / 0 Comments

                It will take years before we know for certain the true impact of mixing 5 million gallons of sweet Louisiana crude oil and another 1 million gallons of toxic dispersants into the complicated ecosystem of the Gulf of Mexico. Fisherman and politician George Barisch can’t wait for years. In order to keep his life and family going, Barisch got back to fishing as soon as he possibly could. When I saw him last week he’d just pulled his boat out of Gulf waters, loaded with more than five thousand pounds of shrimp and redfish. One advantage of much of the Gulf having been off-limits to fishing for the good part of a year is that fish stocks are thriving. Despite the haul, there are questions, which George understands better than anyone. How is the market going to recover when much of the country is still hesitant to buy Gulf seafood? And is seafood from the Gulf safe to eat? George answers that question by grilling up a few dozen shrimp in his suburban kitchen (his Gulf-side home was wiped out by Katrina), sprinkled lightly with garlic and lemon. He’s convinced that the fish are untainted, even though he’s got dozens of friends and supporters in the environmental movement who have sworn off Gulf seafood while testing continues. See: TakePart.com

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                • Introductory Remarks - Nancy E. Adler

                  10:33

                  from The National Academies / Added

                  158 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  On June 22nd and 23rd, the IOM hosted Assessing the Human Health Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: An Institute of Medicine Workshop in New Orleans, LA. During the first day's sessions, speakers and panelists discussed the potential adverse health effects for humans stemming from the oil spill for various populations. The second day’s sessions explored current monitoring activities, the types of research methods and data sources currently available, and questions to consider when developing short- and long-term surveillance and monitoring systems.

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                  • Ivor van Heerden on The Clean-Up of the Gulf Oil Spill

                    02:20

                    from TakePart / Added

                    212 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Ivor van Heerden doesn’t seek controversy, but he’s no stranger to it. In 2006, he was fired from his post at LSU after concluding that the Army Corps of Engineers was to blame for the “shoddy, shoddy engineering” missteps that cost New Orleans its levee system during Hurricane Katrina. His conclusion—that almost all the oil is gone—will rankle some; but it's an astute point, albeit one that's hard to swallow for fishermen and Gulf Coast residents whose lives were inalterably impacted by the spill. Ivor would like to think all the attention paid to the Gulf due to the spill would help focus money and attention on fixing the bigger problems impacting the coast. But given his past experience with a government and bureaucracy notorious for corruption, he's not filled with optimism. See: TakePart.com

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                    • Leaks

                      03:13

                      from RobotNerd / Added

                      295 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      A parody of the Wikileaks scandal. Find more info at: http://www.robotnerd.net

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