1. Uncovering the Veil Nebula

    06:18

    from Hubble Space Telescope HD / Added

    2,258 Plays / / 2 Comments

    The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered magnificent sections of the Veil Nebula - the shattered remains of a supernova that exploded some 5-10,000 years ago. The new Hubble images provide beautiful views of the delicate, wispy structure resulting from this cosmic explosion.

    + More details
    • Hubblecast 62: A spiral galaxy with a secret

      04:57

      from HubbleESA / Added

      484 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Despite its appearance, which looks much like countless other galaxies, Messier 106 hides a number of secrets. In this episode of the Hubblecast, Dr Joe Liske (aka Dr J) takes us on a tour of the galaxy. Thanks to a new image, which combines data from Hubble with observations by amateur astronomer Robert Gendler, the galaxy’s secrets are revealed as never before. Credits and download versions are available on: http://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/heic1302a/

      + More details
      • Hubblecast 49: Supersonic jets from newborn stars

        05:16

        from Hubble Space Telescope HD / Added

        322 Plays / / 0 Comments

        In this episode of the Hubblecast, Joe Liske (aka Dr J) looks at newborn stars firing out jets of matter. These jets may cast new light on how the Sun formed 4.5 billion years ago. An international team of scientists led by astronomer Patrick Hartigan of Rice University in Houston, USA, has collected enough high-resolution Hubble images over a 14-year period to stitch together time-lapse movies of these jets.

        + More details
        • One way voyage to the edge of the known universe

          11:48

          from Salar Golestanian / Added

          1,597 Plays / / 0 Comments

          The animation is built with images taken from the Hubble telescope, as well as the material provided with many thanks from their official sites acknowledged below. The Voyage to the Edge of the Universe is science fantasy a journey that explores the science and history behind some of the distant celestial bodies in the galaxies near and far. Whilst made with great care to ensure authenticity of the cosmological and physical laws, but a little Sci-Fi Genre is also added. This remarkable, epic voyage across the space and time, takes us from the Earth, past the planets in our solar system like Saturn and our neighbouring planets, out of our Solar System, to the nearest stars, nebulae and galaxies black holes and beyond. For the ship proportion we are using a new approach to generate a Wormhole in number of steps all the way to the edge of the Universe. The Story This video is more fiction than science and in it is journey through the universe is as if you are watching a Sci-Fi adventure. In part two of this series, I will be talking more about the science of the ship that could make this journey possible. The ship is just a big space telescope that is surrounded by impenetrable egg shaped shell that is made of a thin atomic size membrane that builds the Higgs Filed. This shell is solid and is completely made up of subatomic with no space between the nuclides so the strong force can protect it and the Higgs field can make the whole space around the egg-ship seem massless and therefore invisible to our reference frame. This egg-ship therefore behaves like neutrinos and is able to travel through solid matter and be unaffected by matter scattered in its path to the edge of the universe. The field protects the telescope by making it massless. It is therefore invisible to our reference frame and yet only photons can penetrate the shell and therefore can see its surrounding space. It enters number of small black-holes to enable it to travel at incredible speeds to the edge of the universe in about 11 minutes duration of the video. This is a one way voyage as it reaches the edge of the universe where laws of physics breaks down -- so does its ability to send signals back to earth. Our Egg-Ship and the science of wormholes: Whilst we all consider the black hole as a black enormously heavy object -- in my view the blackness is purely seen from our earthly reference frame, since no light is given off from the black hole. Therefore, the wormhole/black-hole is completely black and invisible from our reference frame -- and yet, when the ship enters the event horizon and is sucked inside, to the observer inside the egg ship will see the world as white. This is because the noise level is extreme and therefore everything will be seen as white. There on in a blink of an eye the egg-ship moves great distances thought he space and time of our cosmos and then when it comes out the other side, our egg ship has covered another few billion light years to a new exciting place to encounter more wonders of the cosmos. • The eye on the universe is by Deep Impact Spacecraft • Telescope's mirror is used both to observe and transmit finding back to earth • Formation of a ring around an extrasolar planet • vampire star and Crab Supernova Explosion • red supergiant supernova progenitor star exploding • Star-forming region S 106 • exoplanet, Fomalhaut b, orbiting its sun, Fomalhaut. Acknowledgements: Space for Europe: esa.int Nasa Multimedia: nasa.gov Music: Pavane pour une infante défunte - http://salaro.com/537.re Web: salaro.com Product: dotnetnuke.co.uk Blog: salargolestanian.com SciFi: scifiwood.com About Salar: Salar's main business is at salaro.com & with team of 12, builds maintains software solutions based on Microsoft .net for both CMS and Ecommerce Platforms, DotnetNuke and nopCommerce. Forthe latest news you can visit the respective sites above. Salar's early academic years was doing Physics so he has a good understanding of the Science & Technology in particular Physics & Mathematics. The web world today, moves and progresses swiftly, so I hope to keep a continuous flow of work related information and ideas in my subsequent blogs or Salaro TV

          + More details
          • What has Hubble taught us about the planets?

            06:44

            from Hubble Space Telescope HD / Added

            978 Plays / / 0 Comments

            For nineteen years, NASA/ESA' s Hubble Space Telescope has made some of the most dramatic discoveries in the history of astronomy but it has also helped scientists learn more about our own Solar System. From its vantage point 600 km above the Earth, Hubble has studied every planet in our Solar System except Mercury where light from the Sun would damage its instruments. Hubble has captured the impact of a comet on Jupiter, immense storms on Neptune and even tiny dwarf planets at the edge of our Solar System. The veteran telescope keeps a watchful eye on our solar backyard.

            + More details
            • Hubblecast 44: Hubble spies on the Tarantula Nebula

              04:47

              from HubbleESA / Added

              237 Plays / / 0 Comments

              The Hubblecast's Joe Liske (Dr J) takes us on a tour of the Tarantula Nebula. Bright star forming gas clouds, super star clusters and supernova remnants are just some of the sights in this dramatic region of the night sky. Download this episode (various formats available) from: http://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/heic1105a/

              + More details
              • Hubblecast 26: Exceptionally deep view of strange galaxy

                04:34

                from HubbleESA / Added

                240 Plays / / 0 Comments

                A spectacular new image of an unusual spiral galaxy in the Coma Galaxy Cluster has been created from data taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. It reveals lots of new details of the galaxy, NGC 4921, as well as an extraordinary rich background of more remote galaxies stretching back to the early Universe. This episode is available for download in various formats on: http://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/heic0901c/

                + More details
                • Hubblecast 75: Dwarf Galaxies that Pack a Punch

                  08:02

                  from HubbleESA / Added

                  161 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  This new Hubblecast episode looks at starburst dwarf galaxies in a time when most of the stars in the Universe were formed. New NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observations show that dwarf galaxies played a bigger role than expected in the early history of the Universe. This episode looks at the dwarf galaxies that form stars in sudden bursts, explores just how rampantly they are creating new stars and unravels when, where and how the stars in our Universe formed. More information and download options: http://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/heic1412a/ Subscribe to our iTunes channel here: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/hubblecast-hd/id258935617 Credit: ESA/Hubble Directed by: Georgia Bladon Visual design and editing: Martin Kornmesser Written by: Georgia Bladon Narration: Sara Mendes da Costa Images: NASA, ESA Videos: NASA, ESA Animation: Martin Kornmesser & Luis Calcada; Galaxy Collision (6:39): Patrik Jonsson, Greg Novak & Joel Primack (UC Santa Cruz, USA) Music: Johan B. Monell (www.johanmonell.com) Web and technical support: Mathias Andre and Raquel Yumi Shida Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen

                  + More details
                  • Born in Beauty: Proplyds in the Orion Nebula

                    06:15

                    from Hubble Space Telescope HD / Added

                    234 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Visible to the naked eye, only 1500 light-years from Earth, the great Orion Nebula has been known and revered since ancient times. A popular target of Hubble, researchers have now identified 42 new discs within it that could be the beginnings of new planetary systems like our own.

                    + More details
                    • Crash of the Titans

                      05:07

                      from Hubble Space Telescope HD / Added

                      153 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      In this episode of the Hubblecast, scientists Jay Anderson and Roeland van der Marel show how they have used Hubble observations to predict the future of the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way. Projecting the motion of Andromeda’s stars over the next 8 billion years, the astronomers now know the path that galaxy is taking through space. And it’s heading straight for us! Computer simulations based on Hubble observations show how the two galaxies will crash together in around 4 billion years’ time. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/STScI Visual design and editing: Martin Kornmesser Web and technical support: Raquel Yumi Shida and Mathias André Written by: Oli Usher Interviews: Mary Estacion (NASA/STScI) Animations: Frank Summers (NASA/STScI), Greg Bacon (NASA/STScI) Narration: Dr J (Joe Liske) Images: NASA & ESA Music: John Stanford from Deep Space Directed by: Oli Usher Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."