1. Accompaniment vital to JRS work

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    from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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    Fr. David Holdcroft, S.J., the Regional Director of Jesuit Refugee Service Southern Africa, discusses the necessity of accompaniment in JRS' work with refugees. Accompaniment is an essential element of the mission and methodology of Jesuit Refugee Service/USA. To accompany means to be a companion. We are companions of Jesus, so we wish to be companions of those with whom he preferred to be associated, the poor and the outcast. To accompany is a practical and effective action. Not infrequently it is precisely the way in which protection is given. It is a way to ‘internationalize’ a situation. The presence of an international team can sometimes prevent an attack on refugees. Moreover, presence can be a sign. That a free person chooses willingly and faithfully to accompany those who are not free, who had no choice about being there, is itself a sign, a way of eliciting hope. Our accompaniment affirms that God is present in human history, even in its most tragic episodes. We experience this presence. God does not abandon us. As pastoral workers, we focus on this vision, and are not side-tracked by political maneuverings and ethnic divisions, whether they are among the refugees or among the agencies and governments who decide their fate. http://www.jrsusa.org Produced by Christian Fuchs — Jesuit Refugee Service/USA

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    • Accompanying people in detention

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      from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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      Jesuit Father Richard Sotelo discusses the Jesuit Refugee Service/USA mission of accompaniment, and how it has helped inspire him to minister to detainees at the federal detention center in El Paso, Texas, for 15 years. Fr. Sotelo notes that the spiritual aspects of accompaniment flow both ways. The Jesuit Refugee Service/USA chaplaincy programs provide pastoral and religious assistance to meet the needs of non-citizens detained by the Department of Homeland Security in three U.S. federal detention centers located in Texas, Arizona and New York. These programs enable people of all faiths to have access to pastoral care within their faith tradition. During 2013, Jesuit Refugee Service/USA chaplaincy programs coordinated 1,339 religious services, 504 religious teachings, and 582 spiritual support sessions in which 50,566 detainees participated. JRS/USA's chaplaincy staff spent nearly 1,071 hours of direct service offering religious services, religious teachings, and spiritual support. In addition, our chaplains spent 1,086 hours visiting detainees in special housing units as well as another 1,655 hours providing detainees with religious items, processing requests for religious diets. Volunteers played a significant role by giving more than 1,538 hours for religious services, religious teachings, and spiritual support. Learn more on our website: http://www.jrsusa.org/campaigns_focus?TN=PROMO-20100907030248

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      • A Learning experience at Kakuma Refugee Camp

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        from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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        Liz Lock, the Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins coordinator at Kakuma refugee camp in northwestern Kenya talks about her work at the camp. Jesuit Refugee Service enables approximately 280,000 children, young people and adults to receive primary, secondary, tertiary and vocational education services each year. JRS places the highest priority on ensuring a better future for refugees by investing heavily in education and training. Jesuit Refugee Service undertakes advocacy to ensure all displaced children be provided with access to quality education. A UNHCR partner and an international non-governmental Catholic organization, JRS services are provided to refugees regardless of race, ethnic origin or religious beliefs. "Education is a key in combating the evil of hatred, violence and war. I'm ever more convinced of that," says JRS International Director Fr Peter Balleis S.J. "Learning is a way to nourish, in a situation of utter despair, the hope in people, the hope in children. It is so important to get (displaced and refugee) children into school, to establish a routine of life. It is important to keep learning, it is a form of trauma healing in the midst of a conflict." Learn more about Jesuit Refugee Service and JC:HEM on our website: http://jrsusa.org/campaigns_focus?TN=PROMO-20130815114542

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        • Alternative Healing Compound at Kakuma Refugee Camp

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          from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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          In response to the harsh reality of camp life for refugees at Kakuma, Jesuit Refugee Service has turned its psychosocial program sites into oases of tranquility. Patients who enter the Alternative Healing compound find that its cooling trees and restful plants and benches creates a climate of peace and relaxation at odds with the heat and noise of the surrounding camp. The JRS team at Kakuma believes this atmosphere is part of the healing that many refugees receive through our programs there.

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          • A Message for the People of Syria from Syrian Americans

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            from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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            Last fall, Dr. Raymond Khoudary organized a fundraiser with friends in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Dr. Khoudary is originally from Aleppo, Syria. He and his family and friends raised about $70,000 to help Jesuit Refugee Service accompany and serve the people of Syria. Learn more about JRS in Syria on our website: http://jrsusa.org/syria

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            • 12 Cameras | The Vwa Fanm Project

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              from Irene Carolina Herrera / Added

              179 Plays / / 1 Comment

              Life isn't easy for Haitian migrants living in the Dominican Republic. Many of them women and mostly undocumented, they are easy targets for trafficking and exploitation, and face the constant fear of deportation. But, given a digital camera and an audio recorder to document their stories of hope and struggle, some of the women have begun to find a stronger voice for themselves. This short documentary, part of a broader project called "Vwa Fanm" which means women's voices in Creole, gives an insight into the experiences of 12 Haitian migrant women as they take part in a multimedia storytelling workshop. Guided by media professionals, coaches and students they use these skills to create their own multimedia pieces. This project was funded by the Knight Center for International Media at the University of Miami and was done in collaboration with the Jesuit Refugee and Migrant Service in the Dominican Republic. Parts of this work are also included in the final longer documentary titled "Crossing Hispaniola". To see the whole project and the women's multimedia stories please view http://vwafanm.glocalstories.org/ Video also available at http://www.viewchange.org/videos/12-cameras-haitian-women-share-their-lives Executive Director KCIM: Sanjeev Chatterjee Advisor: Rich Beckman Executive Producer: Irene Herrera Video: Irene Herrera, Deborah Acosta, Alessandra Villaamil

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              • Central American refugees flee violence

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                from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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                Migration from the Northern Triangle of Central America — El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras — has risen steadily as violence has increased. Mary Small of Jesuit Refugee Service/USA and Shaina Aber of the United States Jesuit Conference explain what is driving people to flee for their lives. Learn more at http://www.jrsusa.org Youth gang violence has intensified in the last decade, and as drug trafficking routes have shifted to Central America, violence associated with the drug trade has risen as well. Honduras has the highest homicide rate in world; from 2005-2012, murders of women and girls have increased 346% while murders of men and boys are up 292%. In all three countries, rates of impunity are over 90%. Child advocates, especially from Honduras and El Salvador, report accounts of children and teenagers subject to assaults and intimidation from gangs, and of children being forcibly recruited by gangs who have "join or die" polices. In a survey conducted by UNHCR of 404 Central American children detained at the border in 2013, UNHCR found that 58% of the children might be in need of international protection. Information cited in the video comes from: Acre, Alberto. "Acusan a Policía De Honduras De Operar Escuadrones De La Muerte." El Heraldo. Publicaciones Y Noticias S.A. (PUBLYNSA.), 17 Mar. 2013. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1rWU6j5 Avalos, Jessica, and Suchit Chavez. "The Northern Triangle: The Countries That Don't Cry for Their Dead." InSight Crime: Organized Crime in the Americas. Fundación InSight Crime, 23 Apr. 2014. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1u7ik8g Cantor, David. "The New Wave: Forced Displacement Caused by Organized Crime in Central America and Mexico." Refugee Survey Quarterly 33.2 (2014): n. pag. Oxford Journals. Web. 1 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1nZiNK5 Centro De Derechos De Mujeres. "Status of Violence against Women in Honduras." Americas Program. Center for International Policy, July 2014. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/Wex49W El Heraldo. "Repudio E Indignación Por Crimen De Sicarios En Capital De Honduras." El Heraldo. Publicaciones Y Noticias S.A. (PUBLYNSA.),, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 1 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1zDXd0j Kennedy, Elizabeth. "No Childhood Here: Why Central American Children Are Fleeing Their Homes." Immigration Policy Center. American Immigration Council, 1 July 014. Web. 05 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1pHC3Nz Malkin, Elisabeth. "Honduran President Ousted in Coup." The New York Times. The New York Times, 28 June 2009. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://nyti.ms/1m5HGy4 Mejia, Thelma. "Military Given Full Powers to Fight Crime in Honduras."Inter Press Service News Agency. Inter Press Service, 4 Sept. 2013. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1AHV3yj Torres, Carolina. ""LAS CIFRAS DE HOMICIDIOS NO DEBEN MANIPULARSE": SOCIÃLOGA LETICIA SALOMÃN." Presencia Universitaria: El Periódico De La Reforma. Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Honduras, 17 Mar. 2014. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1pMz3tq Trucchi, Giorgio. "Honduras Is Combating Its Homicide Epidemic With Militarization." VICE News. VICE, 16 Apr. 2014. Web. 01 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1oWcxSq United Nations. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. Cocaine from South America to the United States. United Nations, n.d. Web. http://bit.ly/1qVrQxz United Nations. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. Research and Trend Analysis Branch. Global Study on Homicide 2013. Ed. Jonathan Gibbons. United Nations, 10 Apr. 2014. Web. 1 Aug. 2014. unodc.org/gsh/en/index.html Yagenova, Simona V., comp. La Violencia Contra La Mujeres-El Caso De Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Y Nicaragua. Rep. Observatorio De Seguridad Ciudadana De Las Mujeres, 2013. Web. 1 Aug. 2014. http://bit.ly/1nSIafs

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                • Counseling services help refugees in Kakuma begin to heal

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                  from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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                  Jesuit Refugee Service has accompanied and served refugees in Kakuma refugee camp for 20 years. A grant from the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration is enabling JRS to provide social services to residents of the camp in northwestern Kenya. More than 9,400 refugees at Kakuma are direct beneficiaries of the JRS Social Service Program. Another 1,800 people benefit indirectly. One of the objectives of the program is to improve the psychological well being of refugees in the camp while reducing the level of stress-related health problems they suffer from. Counseling services that seek to increase insight into psychological problems and enhance coping mechanisms are the primary means of achieving this goal. To help meet their needs, JRS provides training to camp residents in basic counseling skills. Those who go on to successfully complete the next level of counseling training are hired as community counselors in the counseling department as need arises. In this way refugees are able to help themselves and their fellow camp residents. Learn more about our work at http://www.jrsusa.org

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                  • Education is hope for refugees

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                    from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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                    Jesuit Refugee Service provides counseling services and after school programs for refugees at a camp in Mai Aini, Ethiopia. For urban refugees in the country's capital of Addis Ababa, JRS runs the only Refugee Community Center in the city, providing a range of services from adult education to computer access to emergency needs. In the Goz Beida camp near Djabal, Chad, JRS and Jesuit Commons Higher Education at the Margins have partnered to begin the process of bringing university classes via online learning to refugees from Darfur, Sudan.

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                    • Education key to present, future of Syrian refugees in Lebanon

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                      from Jesuit Refugee Service | USA / Added

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                      Andrea Lari, Jesuit Refugee Service Advocacy Advisor, talks about JRS education programs in Lebanon. More than one million refugees from Syria are now living in Lebanon, swelling the population of the small country. In communities around the country, from the Bekaa Valley to the Mediterranean coast, Jesuit Refugee Service is creating schools for Syrian children in areas where educational opportunities weren't previously available. Learn more: http://www.jrsusa.org

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