1. Triomf VOD

    01:58:28

    from Journeyman Pictures / Added

    March 1994: South Africa. On the day of the first free election Lambert Benade will turn 21, and Uncle Treppie promises him the girl of his dreams. But, in this hilariously horrendous tragi-comedy, as a new world is born, two members of the white trash family are destined to die.

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    • FACTUM BRADLEY

      01:18:10

      from Candice Breitz / Added

      FACTUM BRADLEY, 2010 Left: David Ronald Bradley (born 30 July, 1965). Right: Richard Donald Bradley (born 30 July, 1965). FACTUM BRADLEY is usually shown as a dual-channel video installation on two vertically-mounted plasma displays hung alongside one another. For exhibition purposes, the footage loops endlessly without beginning or end. For more info on FACTUM and to view other portraits from this series, see http://vimeo.com/album/259786 To produce the series of works collectively titled FACTUM (2010), Candice Breitz conducted intensive interviews with seven pairs of identical twins and a single set of identical triplets in and around Toronto during the summer of 2009, footage from which she then edited seven dual-channel video installations (and one tri-channel video installation). Like Robert Rauschenberg’s near-identical paintings FACTUM I and FACTUM II (both 1957), from which the series borrows its title, each interviewee in FACTUM is an imperfect facsimile of their twin: their apparent identicality is soon disrupted by a host of subtle differences. Breitz chose to work with monozygotic twins (and triplets) who spent their formative lives together and who thus draw on shared memories and experience. Each pair of twins was filmed over the course of one long day in a domestic environment designated by the twins – most chose to shoot in the home of one twin, or in their shared home. In each case, Breitz interviewed Twin A for approximately 5–7 hours in the absence of his/her sibling and then directed the same set of questions separately to Twin B. Designed to give each individual the opportunity to narrate his/her own story as s/he chose, the questions covered intimate areas such as childhood, sibling rivalry and family matters, but also zoomed out to allow each subject to address his/her relationship to the world at large. Some questions were specifically slanted to shed light on the mysterious terrain of subject formation: the twins were asked to lend comment, for example, on the nature-nurture debate, or to offer their thoughts on evolution versus creation. Other questions invited the twins to share personal anecdotes or key memories. According to their level of comfort before the camera, some individuals were willing to enter into minute and graphic autobiographical detail, while others set distinct boundaries. Each pair of twins was asked to style themselves as identically as possible for the camera, and left to decide how diligently they wished to fulfill the request. For some the superficial sameness that resulted – almost immediately to be undermined by innumerable small differences that manifest themselves throughout the interview – became an apt metaphor for the projections of sameness that they had been subject to all their lives. Each pair of interviews was later woven together in the editing studio to create a somewhat stereoscopic dual-channel portrait. Breitz’s edits accentuate the push-and-pull relationship between the siblings. As the twins relate their stories, sharp distinctions in their voices, their attitudes, their body language, and their views on the world become apparent. At times they gravitate towards each other, offering almost the same syntax and gestures to describe memory, while at other moments they differ vastly in their conclusions on topics they both consider vital. Breitz’s presence is strongly tangible in each twin portrait – her jagged editing style distances the works from the truth claims of conventional documentary, suggesting that the intertwining forces of fact and fiction are always at play in auto/biography. FACTUM raises questions not only about twinship per se, but also about the struggle that each individual must negotiate in defining him or herself as distinct, while facing constant reminders of the relative role of others in the process of self-definition. The FACTUM series comprises FACTUM BRADLEY, FACTUM HAWKE, FACTUM JACOB, FACTUM KANG, FACTUM McNAMARA, FACTUM MISERICORDIA, FACTUM TANG and FACTUM TREMBLAY. Director + Editor: Candice Breitz Assistant Director: Bianca Semeniuk Camera: Sean Anicic Makeup: Allison Magpayo Production Assistants: Manuela Buechting, Sue Johnson, Eva Michon Post Production: Alex Fahl Commissioned by The Power Plant, Toronto; Commissioning Partner - Partners in Art, Toronto Additional information available upon request: www.candicebreitz.net

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      • FACTUM TREMBLAY

        01:18:08

        from Candice Breitz / Added

        FACTUM TREMBLAY, 2009 Left: Natalyn Tremblay (born 3 April, 1980). Right: Jocelyn Tremblay (born 3 April, 1980). FACTUM TREMBLAY is usually shown as a dual-channel video installation on two vertically-mounted plasma displays hung alongside one another. For exhibition purposes, the footage loops endlessly without beginning or end. For more info on FACTUM and to view other portraits from this series, see http://vimeo.com/album/259786 To produce the series of works collectively titled FACTUM (2010), Candice Breitz conducted intensive interviews with seven pairs of identical twins and a single set of identical triplets in and around Toronto during the summer of 2009, footage from which she then edited seven dual-channel video installations (and one tri-channel video installation). Like Robert Rauschenberg’s near-identical paintings FACTUM I and FACTUM II (both 1957), from which the series borrows its title, each interviewee in FACTUM is an imperfect facsimile of their twin: their apparent identicality is soon disrupted by a host of subtle differences. Breitz chose to work with monozygotic twins (and triplets) who spent their formative lives together and who thus draw on shared memories and experience. Each pair of twins was filmed over the course of one long day in a domestic environment designated by the twins – most chose to shoot in the home of one twin, or in their shared home. In each case, Breitz interviewed Twin A for approximately 5–7 hours in the absence of his/her sibling and then directed the same set of questions separately to Twin B. Designed to give each individual the opportunity to narrate his/her own story as s/he chose, the questions covered intimate areas such as childhood, sibling rivalry and family matters, but also zoomed out to allow each subject to address his/her relationship to the world at large. Some questions were specifically slanted to shed light on the mysterious terrain of subject formation: the twins were asked to lend comment, for example, on the nature-nurture debate, or to offer their thoughts on evolution versus creation. Other questions invited the twins to share personal anecdotes or key memories. According to their level of comfort before the camera, some individuals were willing to enter into minute and graphic autobiographical detail, while others set distinct boundaries. Each pair of twins was asked to style themselves as identically as possible for the camera, and left to decide how diligently they wished to fulfill the request. For some the superficial sameness that resulted – almost immediately to be undermined by innumerable small differences that manifest themselves throughout the interview – became an apt metaphor for the projections of sameness that they had been subject to all their lives. Each pair of interviews was later woven together in the editing studio to create a somewhat stereoscopic dual-channel portrait. Breitz’s edits accentuate the push-and-pull relationship between the siblings. As the twins relate their stories, sharp distinctions in their voices, their attitudes, their body language, and their views on the world become apparent. At times they gravitate towards each other, offering almost the same syntax and gestures to describe memory, while at other moments they differ vastly in their conclusions on topics they both consider vital. Breitz’s presence is strongly tangible in each twin portrait – her jagged editing style distances the works from the truth claims of conventional documentary, suggesting that the intertwining forces of fact and fiction are always at play in auto/biography. FACTUM raises questions not only about twinship per se, but also about the struggle that each individual must negotiate in defining him or herself as distinct, while facing constant reminders of the relative role of others in the process of self-definition. The FACTUM series comprises FACTUM BRADLEY, FACTUM HAWKE, FACTUM JACOB, FACTUM KANG, FACTUM McNAMARA, FACTUM MISERICORDIA, FACTUM TANG and FACTUM TREMBLAY. Director + Editor: Candice Breitz Assistant Director: Bianca Semeniuk Camera: Sean Anicic Makeup: Allison Magpayo Production Assistants: Manuela Buechting, Sue Johnson, Eva Michon Post Production: Alex Fahl Commissioned by The Power Plant, Toronto; Commissioning Partner - Partners in Art, Toronto Additional information available upon request: www.candicebreitz.net

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        • FACTUM KANG

          01:09:10

          from Candice Breitz / Added

          FACTUM KANG, 2009 Left: Hanna Kang (born 12 February, 1985). Right: Hanjoo Laurie Kang (born 12 February, 1985). FACTUM KANG is usually shown as a dual-channel video installation on two vertically-mounted plasma displays hung alongside one another. For exhibition purposes, the footage loops endlessly without beginning or end. For more info on FACTUM and to view other portraits from this series, see http://vimeo.com/album/259786 To produce the series of works collectively titled FACTUM (2010), Candice Breitz conducted intensive interviews with seven pairs of identical twins and a single set of identical triplets in and around Toronto during the summer of 2009, footage from which she then edited seven dual-channel video installations (and one tri-channel video installation). Like Robert Rauschenberg’s near-identical paintings FACTUM I and FACTUM II (both 1957), from which the series borrows its title, each interviewee in FACTUM is an imperfect facsimile of their twin: their apparent identicality is soon disrupted by a host of subtle differences. Breitz chose to work with monozygotic twins (and triplets) who spent their formative lives together and who thus draw on shared memories and experience. Each pair of twins was filmed over the course of one long day in a domestic environment designated by the twins – most chose to shoot in the home of one twin, or in their shared home. In each case, Breitz interviewed Twin A for approximately 5–7 hours in the absence of his/her sibling and then directed the same set of questions separately to Twin B. Designed to give each individual the opportunity to narrate his/her own story as s/he chose, the questions covered intimate areas such as childhood, sibling rivalry and family matters, but also zoomed out to allow each subject to address his/her relationship to the world at large. Some questions were specifically slanted to shed light on the mysterious terrain of subject formation: the twins were asked to lend comment, for example, on the nature-nurture debate, or to offer their thoughts on evolution versus creation. Other questions invited the twins to share personal anecdotes or key memories. According to their level of comfort before the camera, some individuals were willing to enter into minute and graphic autobiographical detail, while others set distinct boundaries. Each pair of twins was asked to style themselves as identically as possible for the camera, and left to decide how diligently they wished to fulfill the request. For some the superficial sameness that resulted – almost immediately to be undermined by innumerable small differences that manifest themselves throughout the interview – became an apt metaphor for the projections of sameness that they had been subject to all their lives. Each pair of interviews was later woven together in the editing studio to create a somewhat stereoscopic dual-channel portrait. Breitz’s edits accentuate the push-and-pull relationship between the siblings. As the twins relate their stories, sharp distinctions in their voices, their attitudes, their body language, and their views on the world become apparent. At times they gravitate towards each other, offering almost the same syntax and gestures to describe memory, while at other moments they differ vastly in their conclusions on topics they both consider vital. Breitz’s presence is strongly tangible in each twin portrait – her jagged editing style distances the works from the truth claims of conventional documentary, suggesting that the intertwining forces of fact and fiction are always at play in auto/biography. FACTUM raises questions not only about twinship per se, but also about the struggle that each individual must negotiate in defining him or herself as distinct, while facing constant reminders of the relative role of others in the process of self-definition. The FACTUM series comprises FACTUM BRADLEY, FACTUM HAWKE, FACTUM JACOB, FACTUM KANG, FACTUM McNAMARA, FACTUM MISERICORDIA, FACTUM TANG and FACTUM TREMBLAY. Director + Editor: Candice Breitz Assistant Director: Bianca Semeniuk Camera: Sean Anicic Makeup: Allison Magpayo Production Assistants: Manuela Buechting, Sue Johnson, Eva Michon Post Production: Alex Fahl Commissioned by The Power Plant, Toronto; Commissioning Partner - Partners in Art, Toronto Additional information available upon request: www.candicebreitz.net

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          • FACTUM JACOB

            01:03:49

            from Candice Breitz / Added

            FACTUM JACOB, 2010 Left: Miguel Jacob (born 1 July, 1973). Right: Marco Jacob (born 1 July, 1973). FACTUM JACOB is usually shown as a dual-channel video installation on two vertically-mounted plasma displays hung alongside one another. For exhibition purposes, the footage loops endlessly without beginning or end. For more info on FACTUM and to view other portraits from this series, see http://vimeo.com/album/259786 To produce the series of works collectively titled FACTUM (2010), Candice Breitz conducted intensive interviews with seven pairs of identical twins and a single set of identical triplets in and around Toronto during the summer of 2009, footage from which she then edited seven dual-channel video installations (and one tri-channel video installation). Like Robert Rauschenberg’s near-identical paintings FACTUM I and FACTUM II (both 1957), from which the series borrows its title, each interviewee in FACTUM is an imperfect facsimile of their twin: their apparent identicality is soon disrupted by a host of subtle differences. Breitz chose to work with monozygotic twins (and triplets) who spent their formative lives together and who thus draw on shared memories and experience. Each pair of twins was filmed over the course of one long day in a domestic environment designated by the twins – most chose to shoot in the home of one twin, or in their shared home. In each case, Breitz interviewed Twin A for approximately 5–7 hours in the absence of his/her sibling and then directed the same set of questions separately to Twin B. Designed to give each individual the opportunity to narrate his/her own story as s/he chose, the questions covered intimate areas such as childhood, sibling rivalry and family matters, but also zoomed out to allow each subject to address his/her relationship to the world at large. Some questions were specifically slanted to shed light on the mysterious terrain of subject formation: the twins were asked to lend comment, for example, on the nature-nurture debate, or to offer their thoughts on evolution versus creation. Other questions invited the twins to share personal anecdotes or key memories. According to their level of comfort before the camera, some individuals were willing to enter into minute and graphic autobiographical detail, while others set distinct boundaries. Each pair of twins was asked to style themselves as identically as possible for the camera, and left to decide how diligently they wished to fulfill the request. For some the superficial sameness that resulted – almost immediately to be undermined by innumerable small differences that manifest themselves throughout the interview – became an apt metaphor for the projections of sameness that they had been subject to all their lives. Each pair of interviews was later woven together in the editing studio to create a somewhat stereoscopic dual-channel portrait. Breitz’s edits accentuate the push-and-pull relationship between the siblings. As the twins relate their stories, sharp distinctions in their voices, their attitudes, their body language, and their views on the world become apparent. At times they gravitate towards each other, offering almost the same syntax and gestures to describe memory, while at other moments they differ vastly in their conclusions on topics they both consider vital. Breitz’s presence is strongly tangible in each twin portrait – her jagged editing style distances the works from the truth claims of conventional documentary, suggesting that the intertwining forces of fact and fiction are always at play in auto/biography. FACTUM raises questions not only about twinship per se, but also about the struggle that each individual must negotiate in defining him or herself as distinct, while facing constant reminders of the relative role of others in the process of self-definition. The FACTUM series comprises FACTUM BRADLEY, FACTUM HAWKE, FACTUM JACOB, FACTUM KANG, FACTUM McNAMARA, FACTUM MISERICORDIA, FACTUM TANG and FACTUM TREMBLAY. Director + Editor: Candice Breitz Assistant Director: Bianca Semeniuk Camera: Sean Anicic Makeup: Allison Magpayo Production Assistants: Manuela Buechting, Sue Johnson, Eva Michon Post Production: Alex Fahl Commissioned by The Power Plant, Toronto; Commissioning Partner - Partners in Art, Toronto Additional information available upon request: www.candicebreitz.net

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            • BASS BY THE POUND / VOL. ONE by Jah Fish

              01:01:20

              from jah fish / Added

              2,022 Plays / / 0 Comments

              this is a 60 minutes audiovisual mixtape with dubstep bangers and hiphop accapellas. Main mix and editing by Jah Fish, Additional scratches by DJ Hamma ( Spindle Crew / Johannesburg / South Africa) This Video is a non commercial project. All videos have been ripped from youtube, vimeo, dailymotion, etc .... Feel free to post a link to this video on facebook, myspace, etc and please link to my account here. Do not use this video commercially in any way as it contains copyrighted music and video material by following artists: MAIN MUSIC & CLIPS (Tracklisting): (* means the original video has been used) Pinch - airlock + Easy E - Hittin Switches Benga & Skream - Amber + Busta Rhymes - Put your hands where i could see* Rusko - Jahova + Bushbabees - Remember We* Kulture - Steppin Outta Babylon Mrk1 - Sensi Skank + Nas - it ain't hard to tell* Benga and Skream - Judgement + MOP & Heather B - my kinda nigga* digital mystikz - mood dub + frankenstein - the projects skream - afeks + royal flush - rotten apple cotti - daylight robbery + evidence - mr. slow flow* afterdark - slaughter chamber + mobb deep - shook ones part II* benga - killerstep + funkdoobiest - dedicated* benga - musicbox + krs one - ah yeah* ed solo & skool of thought - sludge + audio two - top billin* balaxx "chae style" + Masta Ace "Jeep Ass Nigguh"* Wonder "Undertaker" + GZA "Labels" benga, walsh and kromestar - panik room + erika badu - on and on* OTHER MATERIAL: Icet-T "Warning" album intro Police car chase footage by MagnumStory Footage from "MCs act like they don't know" by KRS One Footage from NWA documentary Footage from "skillz" video by Gangstarr Footage from "Murder Rap" video by Above The Law "Brooklyn" videoclip by Thunderball Productions Live-Footage from The Wailers & The I-THREE "Steppin Out Of Babylon" Footage from the "Top Shottas" trailer "Impala Orange Spy" footage from Revista Street Motors Bitch Slap footage from WWF "Color Wheel" by Pryere Footage from "Black Compton Street Gangs" by nikkeijinproductions Footage from the "Iced Down Medallions" video by Royal Flush and Noreaga Footage from the "So I ..." video by Frankenstein feat. Choclair Turntable Footage "Goya" by Heimat Footage from the KRS-One "HOT" video Footage from the Marco Polo feat. Masta Ace "Nostalgia" video Live footage from a MC Diamondog & Dj Werd Freestyle jam Footage from the True School NYC Park Jam Series "Spanish Harlem Hop" Footage from the RZA and GZA "Third World" video Footage from "Manhattan Bound NYC Subway Train Ride" by WorldTravelerMan Footage from Crooklyn Dodgers "Crooklyn" video Various Das Efx video footage Live footage from a DJ Babu demo show Various footage from Arrested Development videos Various labelpictures from Discogs Various Pictures from Google Pics creative commons licence: cc by-nc-nd

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              • The Metal & Hard Rock From Africa (part 3)

                01:00:04

                from Dean Smith / Added

                10 Plays / / 0 Comments

                The Metal & Hard Rock From Africa (part 3)

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                • FACTUM TANG

                  59:30

                  from Candice Breitz / Added

                  FACTUM TANG, 2010 Left: Joelle Tang (born 25 December, 1990). Middle: Jade Tang (born 25 December, 1990). Right: Mariah Tang (born 25 December, 1990). FACTUM TANG is usually shown as a tri-channel video installation on 3 vertically-mounted plasma displays hung alongside one another. For exhibition purposes, the footage loops endlessly without beginning or end. For more info on FACTUM and to view other portraits from this series, see http://vimeo.com/album/259786 To produce the series of works collectively titled FACTUM (2010), Candice Breitz conducted intensive interviews with seven pairs of identical twins and a single set of identical triplets in and around Toronto during the summer of 2009, footage from which she then edited seven dual-channel video installations (and one tri-channel video installation). Like Robert Rauschenberg’s near-identical paintings FACTUM I and FACTUM II (both 1957), from which the series borrows its title, each interviewee in FACTUM is an imperfect facsimile of their twin: their apparent identicality is soon disrupted by a host of subtle differences. Breitz chose to work with monozygotic twins (and triplets) who spent their formative lives together and who thus draw on shared memories and experience. Each pair of twins was filmed over the course of one long day in a domestic environment designated by the twins – most chose to shoot in the home of one twin, or in their shared home. In each case, Breitz interviewed Twin A for approximately 5–7 hours in the absence of his/her sibling and then directed the same set of questions separately to Twin B. Designed to give each individual the opportunity to narrate his/her own story as s/he chose, the questions covered intimate areas such as childhood, sibling rivalry and family matters, but also zoomed out to allow each subject to address his/her relationship to the world at large. Some questions were specifically slanted to shed light on the mysterious terrain of subject formation: the twins were asked to lend comment, for example, on the nature-nurture debate, or to offer their thoughts on evolution versus creation. Other questions invited the twins to share personal anecdotes or key memories. According to their level of comfort before the camera, some individuals were willing to enter into minute and graphic autobiographical detail, while others set distinct boundaries. Each pair of twins was asked to style themselves as identically as possible for the camera, and left to decide how diligently they wished to fulfill the request. For some the superficial sameness that resulted – almost immediately to be undermined by innumerable small differences that manifest themselves throughout the interview – became an apt metaphor for the projections of sameness that they had been subject to all their lives. Each pair of interviews was later woven together in the editing studio to create a somewhat stereoscopic dual-channel portrait. Breitz’s edits accentuate the push-and-pull relationship between the siblings. As the twins relate their stories, sharp distinctions in their voices, their attitudes, their body language, and their views on the world become apparent. At times they gravitate towards each other, offering almost the same syntax and gestures to describe memory, while at other moments they differ vastly in their conclusions on topics they both consider vital. Breitz’s presence is strongly tangible in each twin portrait – her jagged editing style distances the works from the truth claims of conventional documentary, suggesting that the intertwining forces of fact and fiction are always at play in auto/biography. FACTUM raises questions not only about twinship per se, but also about the struggle that each individual must negotiate in defining him or herself as distinct, while facing constant reminders of the relative role of others in the process of self-definition. The FACTUM series comprises FACTUM BRADLEY, FACTUM HAWKE, FACTUM JACOB, FACTUM KANG, FACTUM McNAMARA, FACTUM MISERICORDIA, FACTUM TANG and FACTUM TREMBLAY. Director + Editor: Candice Breitz Assistant Director: Bianca Semeniuk Camera: Sean Anicic Makeup: Allison Magpayo Production Assistants: Manuela Buechting, Sue Johnson, Eva Michon Post Production: Alex Fahl Commissioned by The Power Plant, Toronto; Commissioning Partner - Partners in Art, Toronto Additional information available upon request: www.candicebreitz.net

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                  • Ivan Vladislavic in conversation with Peter Beilharz @ Reader's Feast Book Shop, Melbourne

                    59:20

                    from Thesis Eleven / Added

                    44 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    South African author Ivan Vladislavic talks to thesis eleven director Peter Beilharz. Ivan Vladislavic is the leading South African writer of urban fiction. His work combines irony, humour, engagement and detachment, the insight and wisdom of the flaneur in this new and different environment. His recent works include Double Negative (2011); A Labour of Moles (2012); The Loss Library (2012,) and the fragments in Portrait with Keys (2006).

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                    • Occupy Forum with Connie Field 15 Oct 2012

                      59:16

                      from Peter Menchini / Added

                      44 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Strategies & Tactics of the Anti-Apartheid Movement: Bringing Down an Immoral System No one thought it could be done. The Apartheid system in South Africa was so entrenched, the power imbalance so stark, it appeared impossible to create a wedge to dismantle the system. Yet the enormity of the injustice sent out a signal to people across the globe who began the process of bringing Apartheid down. How did they do it? Connie Field, documentary filmmaker and historian who spent 15 years creating the 10-part series “Have You Heard from Johannesburg?” deconstructed the spectrum of strategies and tactics applied, and how they succeeded in making a change most believed could never happen. What worked? What failed? How can the Occupy Movement learn and adapt methods to make radical change in our society? Join us at Forum in the Park to find out! We oppose governments that don’t represent the People!!! Another world is possible!!! All are invited to join in the discussion!

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