1. Living Memories

    31:23

    from Fred Biddulph / Added

    19 Plays / / 0 Comments

    North West Lodestar CIC met up with a group of people from Atherton Court Retirement home in New Brighton on Merseyside. They talked about their years when they where a lot younger and some very interesting stories came out.

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    • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 1

      04:15

      from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

      76 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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      • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 2

        04:11

        from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

        29 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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        • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Sylvester Kiger

          02:54

          from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

          33 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Excerpt, "House Key" Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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          • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 3

            02:50

            from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

            32 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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            • Living Memories

              02:14

              from Lisa Dupre / Added

              3 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Five New Zealanders are lost on our roads every week. Their families don’t just lose a loved one. They lose everything that person could have become. Using the science of forensic age progression combined with the artistry of WETA digital, road safety charity Brake created five portraits of people who were denied their potential, as they would look today. The campaign was launched by PR and unpaid media, capturing the attention of the nation on the eve of Road Safety Week. After an intimate PR launch event featured on NZ’s highest rating current affairs show, the campaign was featured in editorial, TV, press, outdoor, digital, online and social media.

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              • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Junelle Sykes

                01:54

                from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                35 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Excerpt, "Home and Community" Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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                • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Dorothy Coleman

                  01:14

                  from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                  19 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Excerpt, "Generations" Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview. For more information visit: http://anthropology.as.uky.edu/anthropology-oral-history-0

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                  • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Marie Laffoon

                    01:10

                    from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                    22 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Excerpt, "Lincoln School" Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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                    • Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Kathy (Lambert) Storie

                      01:04

                      from UK College of Arts & Sciences / Added

                      25 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Excerpt, "Funerals" Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

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