1. 12 Artists: On Childhood

    11:49

    from Louisiana Channel / Added

    “Most artists have terrible childhoods”. Meet 12 exceptional contemporary artists who reflect upon their early years and how it shaped their life and art. American video artist Bill Viola was a shy and introvert child, who spent most of his time drawing alone. Post minimalist artist Richard Tuttle grew up in a family constellation, which made him uncertain about who really was his mother. German artist Georg Baselitz tried hard to break the role of being ‘the teacher’s son’. South African artist William Kentridge had a long artistic detour before he returned to his childhood passion for drawing. German filmmaker Wim Wenders grew up in post-war Germany, which came to influence the way he perceived the world – and art. British author Salman Rushdie’s first meeting with the magic of books was through his father’s bedtime stories. German novelist Daniel Kehlmann cites Marcel Proust and argues that you never live as intensely again as you did as a reading child. Rock singer and poet Patti Smith’s favourite character as a child was Peter Pan and so she decided that she didn’t want to grow up - and was heartbroken when she found out, that she didn’t have a choice. Swedish novelist Henning Mankell was lucky to grow up with a father who was always very attentive to what he said. German novelist Herta Müller’s first childhood meeting with the concept of mortality was through plants. American artist Yoko Ono still feels her childhood and youth, believing that your earlier stages of life continue to exist within. German artist and enfant terrible Jonathan Meese works with his mother and states that art is a family business. Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden Works shown in this video, in order of appearance, by: Richard Tuttle, Bill Viola, Georg Baselitz, Wim Wenders, William Kentridge, Astrid Kruse Jensen and Jonathan Meese.

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    • 8 Artists: Advice to the Young

      08:36

      from Louisiana Channel / Added

      Watch, listen and soak in the words of 8 prominent artists, who have strong and diverse thoughts on what constitutes insightful advice to young artists. Serbian performance artist Marina Abramovich feels that it is essential to be ready to fail. South African artist William Kentridge believes that good advice has more to do with the interaction between the person giving it and the person receiving it. Rock singer and poet Patti Smith shares the advice that writer William S. Burroughs once gave her: to build and protect your name by producing good work, and eventually the name will become its own currency. American singer David Byrne emphasizes the importance of not undervaluing your own artistic satisfaction. German film director Wim Wenders stresses that you have to do what no one else can do better than you. Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson recommends that you are sensitive to your surroundings - and British artists Dinos and Jake Chapman cut to the bone. For full-length interviews with the above artists and more, have a look here: http://channel.louisiana.dk/search/content/Advice Produced by: Christian Lund Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014 Supported by Nordea-fonden

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      • Olafur Eliasson: Advice to the Young

        02:12

        from Louisiana Channel / Added

        “Artists should have confidence in the fact that making a drawing is changing the world.” Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson, here presents his strong and personal advice to young artists. “Making art is making the world”, Eliasson continues, stressing his point that art should not be marginalized, as art is not fragile, but quite the opposite: “Working with art is working with something that is very fierce, very strong and very robust.” Artists should be very sensitive to their surroundings and the context in which they find themselves. They should, however, also stay true to themselves and make sure that the strong market and its attractiveness does not commercialize them. Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) works with sculpture, painting, photography, film and installations. He grew up in Iceland and Denmark and studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine arts from 1989-1995. In 1995 he moved to Berlin where he founded Studio Olafur Eliasson. Eliasson is behind many major exhibitions and projects around the world, such as ‘The Weather Project’ at Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2003, ‘Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson’ organized by SFMOMA in 2007, which travelled until 2010 to major venues such the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and ‘Riverbed’ at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Among Eliasson’s projects in public space are ‘Green River’, carried out in various cities from 1998-2001 and ‘The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion’ in 2007 in collaboration with Kjetil Thorsen of Snøhetta. He lives and works in Copenhagen and Berlin. Olafur Eliasson was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2014 Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Supported by Nordea-fonden

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        • Olafur Eliasson: A Riverbed Inside the Museum

          42:15

          from Louisiana Channel / Added

          Like lava from a volcano, Olafur Eliasson’s fascinating installation ‘Riverbed’ runs through the Danish Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. The highly praised artist here shares his intriguing thoughts behind the installation. “The currency of trust” is the fundament on which ‘Riverbed’ is built - an installation that, according to Eliasson, bears resemblance to both the contemplative power of a Japanese garden as well as of ancient Pompeii after the destructive outbreak of Mount Vesuvius. In our society, a lot of things are defined by exclusion, and public institutions such as museums have to show that they have full trust in the artwork, the artist and the visitor in order for the latter to feel completely included. “If an audience feels trusted, then they dare to get involved”, says Eliasson. To fully experience the installation, the visitors have to feel comfortable destabilizing themselves on purpose, in this case e.g. by rethinking their way of walking on the many rocks of his work. The concept of reality intrigues Eliasson, who finds that the way we engage in the world is based on our ‘model’, whether it be a social, cultural or other type of model: “The way we take in the world is not natural, it’s cultural.” Thereby, it becomes a construction in which “the authorship of reality lies within the beholder and the museum is constituted by the visitor.” In other words, reality becomes the way in which you choose to perceive or handle your model. ‘Riverbed’ is thus a part of this unreality, for as Eliasson concludes, “There are no real things.” Olafur Eliasson (b. 1967) works with sculpture, painting, photography, film and installations. He grew up in Iceland and Denmark and studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine arts from 1989-1995. In 1995 he moved to Berlin where he founded Studio Olafur Eliasson. Eliasson is behind many major exhibitions and projects around the world, such as ‘The Weather Project’ at Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2003, ‘Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson’ organized by SFMOMA in 2007, which travelled until 2010 to major venues such the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and ‘Riverbed’ at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Among Eliasson’s projects in public space are ‘Green River’, carried out in various cities from 1998-2001 and ‘The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion’ in 2007 in collaboration with Kjetil Thorsen of Snøhetta. He lives and works in Copenhagen and Berlin. Olafur Eliasson was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in 2014. Camera: Klaus Elmer Edited by: Kamilla Bruus Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2014 Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Supported by Nordea-fonden

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          • My Art is Like a River

            01:38

            from Bernd Haussmann / Added

            "Wenn ich eine aesthetische Empfindung habe, ist es so, als würde ich das Leben in seinem Fluss erhaschen. Was ich schoen finde, ist zwar der Moment des Innehaltens, aber mitten in der Bewegung des Lebens." Charles Pépin About process, intuition and concept

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            • benandsebastian: museum of nothing

              15:19

              from Louisiana Channel / Added

              In the Museum of Nothing, the presence of absence is on display. And doubt is introduced into history. Because the visitors are asked to fill the voids and gaps of the collection with their own stories, benandsebastian argue. The Museum of Nothing consists of range of curios departments - the department of substitutes, the department of impossible returns, the department of fakes and forgeries, the department of past orders, the department of hidden agendas, even the department of dust, just to mention a few. In the end though, nothing is shown. The cabinets and displays of the museum of nothing are empty. Still though, benandsebastian explain, things that are absent can still have a presence. As with an amputated leg, you still have the phantom pain and the lost leg has a very strong presence. As well as the phantom limb becomes a representation of what is not there anymore. This thought then leads benandsebastian towards questioning institutional identities. Very often museums, cultural institutions and institutions in general present themselves as being whole and complete, as if they don't have any gaps and inconsistencies. But as with history, objects that have been regarded as treasured artefacts, can turn out as fakes from one moment to the other. Then they not only loose their status as artefacts, but cease to exist within the collection, thus their cultural value. The Museum of Nothing thus explores, how institutions create sets of values - both in monetary, but also cultural terms. It shows that the pretension of cultural consistency is just that and has to be questioned. As with history, the presence is always ambivalent, benandsebastian argue. "Our experience is, that if you start to doubt a received view on history, then conversations start quite naturally - and new histories are quickly written, because we cannot deal with no stories being present. Making gaps and creating doubt thus generates more stories." benandsebastian is a visual artist duo that was formed in 2006 by Ben Clement (b. 1981 in Oxford, GB) and Sebastian de la Cour (b. 1980 in Copenhagen, Dk). Both members are educated architects and use the language of architecture in their artistic work as a means of addressing the relationship between the psychological spaces of the mind and the physical spaces of the body and it's surroundings. For it's elaborately crafted sculptural and installation art works the duo has received diverse prices - besides others by the Danish Arts Council, the Danish Arts Foundation as well as the talent prize of the Danish newspaper Politiken. Today benandsebastian live and work in Berlin and Copenhagen. Read more about the Museum of Nothing on their website: http://www.benandsebastian.com/?portfolio_item=museum-of-nothing benandsebastian were interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner Camera by Klaus Elmer Editing by Kamilla Bruus Produced by Marc-Christoph Wagner, 2014 Copyright: Louisiana Channel, produced by Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014. Supported by Nordea-fonden

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              • Sebastian Diaz Morales: Make your enemy your friend

                50:29

                from Louisiana Channel / Added

                In dept portrait of Argentinian video artist Sebastian Diaz Morales who grew up in wild Patagonia where the wind blows 150 km/h. It was the experience of a stranded whale which made Diaz Morales aware of the language of video art. In-dept interview with Sebastian Diaz Morales who presents some of his most important works and tells the story of how he became an artist coming from the small city Comodoro Rivadavia, a "wild place in the middle of Nowhere" in Patagonia, South Argentina. "This place marked a lot of my being, of my identity and therefore the language, the narrative and the topics I uses throughout my films". Sebastian Diaz Morales encountered video when he was given a VHS video camera as a child and started to document family events, but also started playing with the medium. The young Diaz Morales found that it was important that his family and his friends also liked what he filmed, that he had to please a certain audience. Diaz Morales used the wind as a character in his early films "as metaphors to talk about other things, criticizing this environment but in a constructive way". "These societies are very young. We come from immigrants, we are a mix, and we don't know who we are and where we belong." "I am very interested in the notion of reality and fiction. I understand reality as something we construct and as something we can also deconstruct and rebuild it into whichever shape we want to give to it. My work explores the boundaries between reality and fiction", Diaz Morales says. He presents a trilogy of Pasajes (2012-13) that are simple ideas: 'Pasajes I' where a man walks through rooms of Buenos Aires, 'Pasajes II' where a man is climbing stairs in buildings and 'Pasajes III' from Jakarta, Indonesia where a man is crossing streets packed with traffic. Diaz Moreales also talks about 'Oracle' (2007), 'Lucharemos hasta anular la ley' (2004) and 'Insight' from 2012. Sebastian Diaz Morales (b. 1975) is an Argentine visual artist, who belongs to a new generation of Latin American artists. His work has been exhibited widely at many prominent venues, such as the Tate Modern, Centre Pompidou, Bienale Sao Pablo and the Sydney Biennale. In 2009 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. Sebastian Diaz Morales was interviewed at his studio in Amsterdam, February 2014, by Christian Lund, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Photographed by Sandder Lanen Editing by Kamilla Bruus Produced by Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, produced by Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2014. Supported by Nordea-fonden

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                • young KOPENHAGEN @ Louisiana

                  04:18

                  from Kopenhagen / Added

                  128 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  KOPENHAGEN’s young reporters had a talk with Tine Colstrup to learn about the abstract world of swedish artist Hilma Af Klint. Hilma Af Klint - Abstrakt Pioner LOUISIANA 07.03.2014 - 06.07.2014

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                  • Sarabande

                    04:11

                    from Stéphan Aubé / Added

                    4 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Johann Sebastian Bach 1685-1750 Suite n°1 in G major · Sarabande BWV 1007 Christian Poltéra, cello directed by Stéphan Aubé camera · Franck Tusolini and Stéphan Aubé sound · Mikkel Nymand montage · Janine Dauterich artistic producer · Lars Fenger production assistant · Sonja Strange Filmed at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art © Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

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                    • Disco-Toccata

                      02:13

                      from Stéphan Aubé / Added

                      13 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Guillaume Connesson * 1970 Disco-Toccata © Universal Music Vision Florent Héau, clarinet Jérôme Pernoo, cello "My score borrows two elements from Disco music (fashionable since the end of the seventies): the stubborn assertiveness of the pulsating rhythm and the melodic formulae of string riffs. In Disco Toccata, I playfully develop both, exposing them to the unrelenting laws of classical music. For me, this rapidity and repetitiveness draws parallels with Baroque toccata, where instrumental virtuosity is the main expressive source. I have always been surprised by the similarities between todayʼs popular music and the baroque style, so I couldnʼt resist the pleasure (and the provocation) of mixing the two in one short piece." Guillaume Connesson Also available on DVD directed by Stéphan Aubé edited by Uffe Borgwardt sound production by Preben Iwan camera · Dorte Bach and Henrik Nielsen video assistant · Jacob Bundgaard color grading · Christian Skriver executive producer · Lars Fenger produced by Louisiana Museum of Modern Art and Cubus Film filmed and recorded at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art © Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

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