1. Penelope Umbrico: The Edge of Vision Interview Series

    10:18

    from Aperture Foundation / Added

    1,320 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Penelope Umbrico presents her installation of photographs TVs (From Craigslist), a series of TV images for sale she culled from Internet with the reflection of flash, giving insight of the seller’s presence and creating an indirect intimacy. Interested in conceptual rather than formal abstraction, Umbrico considers herself a documentary photographer, “a traveler through media,” sourcing found generic images and examining in this work, the shift of value from an Internet image to a physical one in the art market. This clip is part of the series of video interviews including the curator, Lyle Rexer, and artists from the exhibition on view at Aperture Gallery, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" from May 15 to July 16, 2009. From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision, curated by Lyle Rexer, showcases the work of nineteen international contemporary photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. The works explore diverse aspects of the photographic experience, including the chemistry of traditional photography, the direct capture of light without a camera, temporal extensions, digital sampling of found images, radical cropping, and various deliberate destabilizations of photographic reference. This abstract use of photography often combines other mediums such as painting, sculpture, drawing or video. All artists join a broad contemporary trend to look critically and freshly at a medium commonly considered transparent. The exhibition is accompanied by a new book, "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography" by Lyle Rexer (Aperture, May 2009). Illustrated with more than 150 images, this unprecedented and highly anticipated book documents this phenomenon internationally from the early days of the medium through the present day.

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    • 2 - CARBON III

      02:53

      from Charles Lindsay / Added

      CARBON is a creation of fictitious worlds, drawing on my interest in the aesthetics of space exploration, microscopic discovery and abstract symbols. I am intrigued by the idea that so much of our expanding scientific knowledge is based on images from beyond our body's normal scope of vision. I am also interested in the challenge and implications of comprehending our relative scale within the universe. These videos are made from camera-less negatives which utilize a carbon emulsion on a transparent base, the result of my experiments and manipulation. Numerous generations in the fluid’s history create minute evaporation trails, rendering an archeology of time. Both the CARBON stills and videos are generated from extremely high resolution digital scans of these drawn negatives. I am applying this data in 3D topographic motion programs and producing electronic sound pieces in response to the imagery. 3D, Motion and Video Editing: Tal + Liron Unreich at flike.com NYC. Sound + Visuals: Charles Lindsay Please visit charleslindsay.com to view the CARBON stills and other work and charliesexperiment.com for more on my sound projects. THANK YOU

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      • CARBON I

        02:51

        from Charles Lindsay / Added

        CARBON is a creation of fictitious worlds, drawing on my interest in the aesthetics of space exploration, microscopic discovery and abstract symbols. I am intrigued by the idea that so much of our expanding scientific knowledge is based on images from beyond our body's normal scope of vision. I am also interested in the challenge and implications of comprehending our relative scale within the universe. These videos are made from camera-less negatives which utilize a carbon emulsion on a transparent base, the result of my experiments and manipulation. Numerous generations in the fluid’s history create minute evaporation trails, rendering an archeology of time. Both the CARBON stills and videos are generated from extremely high resolution digital scans of these drawn negatives. I am applying this data in 3D topographic motion programs and producing electronic sound pieces in response to the imagery. 3D, Motion and Video Editing: Tal + Liron Unreich at flike.com NYC. Sound: David Sylvian and Steve Jansen samadhisound.com Please visit charleslindsay.com to view the CARBON stills and other work and charliesexperiment.com for more on my sound projects. THANK YOU

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        • Lyle Rexer: The Edge of Vision Interview Series, Part 1

          03:46

          from Aperture Foundation / Added

          1,014 Plays / / 0 Comments

          This clip is part of the series of video interviews including the curator, Lyle Rexer, and artists from the exhibition on view at Aperture Gallery, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" from May 15 to July 16, 2009. Curator Lyle Rexer speaks about how the project came about and his curatorial choices. Rexer also explains how this ground breaking photography exhibition encourages the viewer not to look at the photograph as a window but rather “to understand the relationship between the image and the surface.” From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision, curated by Lyle Rexer, showcases the work of nineteen international contemporary photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. The works explore diverse aspects of the photographic experience, including the chemistry of traditional photography, the direct capture of light without a camera, temporal extensions, digital sampling of found images, radical cropping, and various deliberate destabilizations of photographic reference. This abstract use of photography often combines other mediums such as painting, sculpture, drawing or video. All artists join a broad contemporary trend to look critically and freshly at a medium commonly considered transparent. The exhibition is accompanied by a new book, "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography" by Lyle Rexer (Aperture, May 2009). Illustrated with more than 150 images, this unprecedented and highly anticipated book documents this phenomenon internationally from the early days of the medium through the present day.

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          • Barbara Kasten: The Edge of Vision Interview Series

            07:10

            from Aperture Foundation / Added

            1,013 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Barbara Kasten presents her work Studio Construct 17 as based on physical constructions that play with light and are created only for the purpose of being photographed. By this approach, the photograph itself becomes the object and is removed from being representative or documentary. Kasten expands that while subject matter is inherent to photography, her images are unidentifiable and exist as records of light that explore spatial and formal ambiguity. This distance results in a more indirect connection between the viewer and the work. This clip is part of the series of video interviews including the curator, Lyle Rexer, and artists from the exhibition on view at Aperture Gallery, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" from May 15 to July 16, 2009. From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision, curated by Lyle Rexer, showcases the work of nineteen international contemporary photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. The works explore diverse aspects of the photographic experience, including the chemistry of traditional photography, the direct capture of light without a camera, temporal extensions, digital sampling of found images, radical cropping, and various deliberate destabilizations of photographic reference. This abstract use of photography often combines other mediums such as painting, sculpture, drawing or video. All artists join a broad contemporary trend to look critically and freshly at a medium commonly considered transparent. The exhibition is accompanied by a new book, "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography" by Lyle Rexer (Aperture, May 2009). Illustrated with more than 150 images, this unprecedented and highly anticipated book documents this phenomenon internationally from the early days of the medium through the present day.

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            • Ellen Carey: The Edge of Vision Interview Series

              07:06

              from Aperture Foundation / Added

              1,007 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Ellen Carey presents her works in the exhibition: the large-scale "Pulls with Lifts and Drops" of film pulled through the rollers of a Polaroid large-format camera and her color photogram, "PushPins", where the artist used pushpins to perforate the photographic paper in the darkroom. Carey explains how abstraction in photography challenges the viewer to rethink the medium, and go beyond the narrative side to explore new arrays of light and color compositions as well as new processes using meaningful materials that reference the history of photography. She also highlights the physicality of her work often exhibited through large-scale installations. This clip is part of the series of video interviews including the curator, Lyle Rexer, and artists from the exhibition on view at Aperture Gallery, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" from May 15 to July 16, 2009. From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision, curated by Lyle Rexer, showcases the work of nineteen international contemporary photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. The works explore diverse aspects of the photographic experience, including the chemistry of traditional photography, the direct capture of light without a camera, temporal extensions, digital sampling of found images, radical cropping, and various deliberate destabilizations of photographic reference. This abstract use of photography often combines other mediums such as painting, sculpture, drawing or video. All artists join a broad contemporary trend to look critically and freshly at a medium commonly considered transparent. The exhibition is accompanied by a new book, "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography" by Lyle Rexer (Aperture, May 2009). Illustrated with more than 150 images, this unprecedented and highly anticipated book documents this phenomenon internationally from the early days of the medium through the present day.

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              • Lyle Rexer: The Edge of Vision Interview Series, Part 2

                03:55

                from Aperture Foundation / Added

                762 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Lyle Rexer explains how photography is not necessarily based on our memories, recording particular moments as one often assumes but “most photographs, when they are taken, look forward in time or…there are many photographs that when they are excised from their particular moment, actually have no time.” The images Rexer selected for the exhibition "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography," highlight this aspect and question our essential way of looking at other photographs and at reality in general. This clip is part of the series of video interviews including the curator, Lyle Rexer, and artists from the exhibition on view at Aperture Gallery, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" from May 15 to July 16, 2009. From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision, curated by Lyle Rexer, showcases the work of nineteen international contemporary photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. The works explore diverse aspects of the photographic experience, including the chemistry of traditional photography, the direct capture of light without a camera, temporal extensions, digital sampling of found images, radical cropping, and various deliberate destabilizations of photographic reference. This abstract use of photography often combines other mediums such as painting, sculpture, drawing or video. All artists join a broad contemporary trend to look critically and freshly at a medium commonly considered transparent. The exhibition is accompanied by a new book, "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography" by Lyle Rexer (Aperture, May 2009). Illustrated with more than 150 images, this unprecedented and highly anticipated book documents this phenomenon internationally from the early days of the medium through the present day.

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                • Bill Armstrong: The Edge of Vision Interview Series

                  08:15

                  from Aperture Foundation / Added

                  709 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Bill Armstrong puts in context his Mandala #450 piece included in the Aperture exhibition, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" with his Infinity series of abstract blurred meditative images that he has been working on for the past twelve years. Going through his work since the 1980’s, Armstrong explains why he uses blurring as a process and his “painterly approach to photography.” At the end, he also introduces his new video work. This clip is part of the series of video interviews including the curator, Lyle Rexer, and artists from the exhibition on view at Aperture Gallery, "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography" from May 15 to July 16, 2009. From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision, curated by Lyle Rexer, showcases the work of nineteen international contemporary photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. The works explore diverse aspects of the photographic experience, including the chemistry of traditional photography, the direct capture of light without a camera, temporal extensions, digital sampling of found images, radical cropping, and various deliberate destabilizations of photographic reference. This abstract use of photography often combines other mediums such as painting, sculpture, drawing or video. All artists join a broad contemporary trend to look critically and freshly at a medium commonly considered transparent. The exhibition is accompanied by a new book, "The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography" by Lyle Rexer (Aperture, May 2009). Illustrated with more than 150 images, this unprecedented and highly anticipated book documents this phenomenon internationally from the early days of the medium through the present day.

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                  • Lyle Rexer on The Edge of Vision (2013)

                    01:59

                    from Aperture Foundation / Added

                    690 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    From the beginning—The Edge of Vision author Lyle Rexer asserts—abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. First printed by Aperture in 2009, The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography examines abstraction at pivotal moments in photography’s history; showcasing photographers who base their practice in some form of abstraction from highly conceptual to more documentary approaches. On the occasion of the 2013 reprint, Lyle Rexer recalls The Edge of Vision’s role in setting a historical context for abstraction, and the centrality of it’s rare and previously unpublished texts in illustrating the diversity of thinking that had gone on around issues in photography.

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                    • CARBON II

                      03:38

                      from Charles Lindsay / Added

                      CARBON is a creation of fictitious worlds, drawing on my interest in the aesthetics of space exploration, microscopic discovery and abstract symbols. I am intrigued by the idea that so much of our expanding scientific knowledge is based on images from beyond our body's normal scope of vision. I am also interested in the challenge and implications of comprehending our relative scale within the universe. These videos are made from camera-less negatives which utilize a carbon emulsion on a transparent base, the result of my experiments and manipulation. Numerous generations in the fluid’s history create minute evaporation trails, rendering an archeology of time. Both the CARBON stills and videos are generated from extremely high resolution digital scans of these drawn negatives. I am applying this data in 3D topographic motion programs and producing electronic sound pieces in response to the imagery. 3D, Motion and Video Editing: Tal + Liron Unreich at flike.com NYC. Sound: David Sylvian and Steve Jansen samadhisound.com Please visit charleslindsay.com to view the CARBON stills and other work and charliesexperiment.com for more on my sound projects. THANK YOU

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