1. Rippling Images

    02:40

    from nathaniel stern / Added

    31 Plays / / 0 Comments

    For Rippling Images, I worked with a team to produce a marine-rated, desktop scanner-based imaging rig, and performed a new series of digital artworks while scuba diving on a live coral reef off the coast of Key Largo in Florida. Everything leaked, everything broke, nothing did what I wanted or expected: and this is precisely what must have happened to finally see the 18 wondrous prints. At stake are not only the ways we perform our bodies, media, concepts and materials, but also the implications of water and land, life and non-life, that we per-form with every day: as individuals, and as a people, and as a part of our habitats. This work has been produced with support from the UWM Graduate School. See the final artworks @ http://nathanielstern.com/rippling-images

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    • stuttering (interactive installation)

      00:28

      from nathaniel stern / Added

      31 Plays / / 0 Comments

      In stuttering, an invisible and asymmetrical projection grid is saturated with trigger points, each activating animated text and spoken word as our bodies cross its path. These ‘virtual buttons’ create an inverse relationship: move quickly, and the piece will itself stutter in a barrage of audiovisual verbiage; move carefully, even cautiously – stutter with your body – and both meaning and bodies emerge. stuttering provokes its viewers into exploring the labor and intimacy of embodied communication.

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      • scripted (interactive installation)

        00:36

        from nathaniel stern / Added

        18 Plays / / 0 Comments

        scripted uses 3D-tracking data to follow participants’ heads, drawing slowly fading, charcoal-like lines of their trajectories. When any of the shapes created resemble an alphabetical character, that letter will be overlaid in the projection, accompanied by its oral recitation. Some letters are more difficult to scribe than others, and many complex characters contain echoes of simpler ones – making writing both difficult, and sometimes accidental. The piece is not about accomplishing specific gestures, but encountering and rehearsing textual moving-thinking-feeling at large.

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        • Tweets in Space

          02:36

          from nathaniel stern / Added

          16 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Tweets in Space beams Twitter discussions from participants worldwide towards GJ667Cc – an exoplanet 22 light years away that might support extraterrestrial life. We originally performed this work on September 21st 2012, as part of the International Symposium on Electronic Art in New Mexico (ISEA2012). During the 30-minute performance, we collected all tweets with our custom #tweetsinspace tag. More than 50 press articles – including the NY Daily News, BBC, Time, Wired and Scientific American – led to worldwide participation, where we gathered over 1500 texts, about 1 tweet per second. These messages ranged from simple greetings to aliens, to worries about the destruction of Earth, to questions of extraterrestrial social and economic systems. Together and as a people, we asked questions, requested photos, and begged forgiveness for humanity’s flaws. In the various threads of ongoing conversation, the most commonly used words (other than articles like ‘the’) were please and love, followed by hello, here, help, and peace. All these voices together express existential feelings of wonder and fear, curiosity and happiness, hope and cynicism, and more. Tweets in Space creates a tension between the depth and shallowness of sharing 140 characters at a time with the entire Internet world, in all its complexity, richness and absurdity, by transmitting our passing thoughts to everywhere and nowhere. This wasn’t just a public performance; here, we performed a public. On November 28th, 2012, all Tweets in Space messages were transmitted via both analog and digital signals towards our target planet, using a high amplitude, high frequency radio telescope. These “twitters” are stretched across all time and space as a reflection on the contemporary phenomenon of the “status” updates we broadcast, both literal and metaphoric. Our stellar discussion will outlive all its original participants, endlessly reverberating themes of connectivity, humility, and optimism for the future.

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          • Nathaniel Stern for MK-Eat.org

            00:40

            from Daniel Kelly / Added

            Make it happen.

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            • 13 Views of a Journey

              01:20

              from nathaniel stern / Added

              177 Plays / / 0 Comments

              13 Views of a Journey (6 x 8 feet), commissioned for the Haggerty Museum's "Current Tendencies II: Artists from Milwaukee," takes Jessica Meuninck-Ganger and Nathaniel Stern's collaborative work to a new scale. Here the artists mount large-scale translucent prints to plexiglass and rear project video through them, creating "moving images on paper." Their 12 animated vignettes are continuously played in random order behind fibrous and inky paper prints, making a dynamic and room-sized book art project.

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              • The Mist: public intervention / eco art

                02:03

                from nathaniel stern / Added

                381 Plays / / 0 Comments

                The Mist, a "sentimental construction," was workshopped between 52 collaborators from the SenseLab in the forests north of Montreal. Each "construction" is a large-scale, site-conditioned intervention made of minimal materials and performed in public space. For the event, "Generating the Impossible," our group worked to re-conceive of what sentiments and constructions are, and how we and they might be introduced and activated, together. Our eventual environmental installation was approximately 45 x 6 meters of rope, rocks, mosquito netting, cable ties, pulleys and tape, all stretched across Mekoos lake. Its form responds to wind and light, and reflections and ripples in the water. Depending on the time of day, and proximity to The Mist - most traveled to it in boats - it waivers between appearing as a bridge, as haze, or as mirrored water from below. The Mist was later brought back to the city, and performed twice in Outremont, Montreal. The first two sentimental constructions, conceptualized by Nathaniel Stern, were publicly performed architectural structures made of rope. Each twists the idea of 'public space' by its double activation: first, through the volunteers who stretch its form outward and around them; and second, through the communal play of the onlookers-turned-participants, who give the structure an/other performative turn. For Generating the Impossible, these were taken as a proposition in form and concept, as ephemeral arrangements that carve out space and frame their contexts. The Mist, like its predecessors, is 'sentimental' in the tensions it creates between nostalgia and possibility, construction and emergence, the pre-formed and the per-formed. Full list of collaborators: Faiz Abhuani, Laura Balladur, Lisa Benson, Lone Bertelsen, Marie-Pier Boucher, Christoph Brunner, Noyale Colin, Laura Cull, Jaime del Val, Aphra Ednie-Brown, Pia Ednie-Brown, Charlotte Farrell, Barb Fornssler, Jonas Fritsch, Paul Gazzola, Diego Gil, Andrew Goodman, Saara Hannula, Patrick Harrop, Sophie Le-Phat Ho, Mike Hornblow, Annette Svaneklink Jakobsen, Thomas Jellis, Jondi Keane, Erin Manning, Michelle Mantsio, Brian Massumi, Kevin Mitchell, Mayra Morales, Lincoln Mudd, Mahasti Mudd, Andrew Murphie, Raphael Ng, Andreia Machado Oliveira, Toni Pape, Leslie Plumb, Virginia Preston, Alan Prohm, Jean-Francois Prost, Ana Ramos, Felix Rebolledo, Troy Rhoades, Nicole Ridgway, Ronald Rose-Antoinette, Bianca Scliar, Ron Simon, Sean Smith, Sidonie Ridgway Stern, Nathaniel Stern, Stephanie Springgay, Alanna Thain and Bodil Marie Stavning Thomsen.

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                • Distill Life Short Promo

                  04:27

                  from FVANG / Added

                  30 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Short documentation of 14 works by Nathaniel Stern and Jessica Meuninck-Ganger, for the Passing Between exhibition at Gallery AOP Johannesburg. Shot and edited in late 2009 by Sean Kafer, with musical score by Michael Szpakowski. * Jessica Meuninck-Ganger and Nathaniel Stern approach both old and new media as form. In their Distill Life works, the artists permanently mount translucent prints and drawings directly on top of video screens, creating moving images on paper. They incorporate technologies and aesthetics from traditional printmaking - including woodblock, silk screen, etching, lithography, photogravure etc – with the technologies and aesthetics of contemporary digital, video and networked art, to explore images as multidimensional. Meuninck-Ganger and Stern hack and tweak, shoot and print, appropriate and remix, edit and draw. Their juxtaposition of anachronistic and disparate methods, materials and content - print and video, paper and electronics, real and virtual - enables novel approaches to understanding each. The artists engage with subject matter ranging from historical portraiture to current events, from hyperreal landscapes to socially awkward moments. The works are surprising, wistful, enchanting, and seriously playful.

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                  • Distill Life Documentary

                    06:39

                    from FVANG / Added

                    90 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Interview with Nathaniel Stern and Jessica Meuninck-Ganger in their studios in Milwaukee Wisconsin, for the Passing Between exhibition at Gallery AOP Johannesburg. Shot and edited in late 2009 by Sean Kafer, with musical score by Michael Szpakowski. * Jessica Meuninck-Ganger and Nathaniel Stern approach both old and new media as form. In their Distill Life works, the artists permanently mount translucent prints and drawings directly on top of video screens, creating moving images on paper. They incorporate technologies and aesthetics from traditional printmaking - including woodblock, silk screen, etching, lithography, photogravure etc – with the technologies and aesthetics of contemporary digital, video and networked art, to explore images as multidimensional. Meuninck-Ganger and Stern hack and tweak, shoot and print, appropriate and remix, edit and draw. Their juxtaposition of anachronistic and disparate methods, materials and content - print and video, paper and electronics, real and virtual - enables novel approaches to understanding each. The artists engage with subject matter ranging from historical portraiture to current events, from hyperreal landscapes to socially awkward moments. The works are surprising, wistful, enchanting, and seriously playful.

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                    • stuttering - interactive installation at Winona State University

                      01:47

                      from nathaniel stern / Added

                      61 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      With "stuttering," viewers-turned-participants use their entire bodies to touch and trigger activation points laid out in a Mondrian-styled grid. Move quickly, and the piece will itself stutter in a barrage of audiovisual verbiage; move carefully, even cautiously – stutter with your body – and both meaning and bodies emerge. Video from installation at Winona State University as part of Nathaniel Stern's solo exhibition, "Mind the Gap," Jan - Feb 2011.

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