1. Diana monkey at Ostrava Zoo

    03:56

    from Enrico Gombala / Added

    25 Plays / / 2 Comments

    Diana monkeys are creatures dwelling in the last remnants of rainforest in several West African countries. Today, the loss of habitat as well as hunting for meat place this primate among those threatened with extinction. The guenon was named after the white coat over its eyebrow that reminds the headdress of Diana, the Roman goddess of hunting. Since captive breeding is not easy in this species, any offspring can be considered a great success. Ostrava Zoo has been a holder of the Diana monkeys since 1975 and has seen more than 30 babies over the period. This animal park has now 17 animals on display, which is a number that cannot be found elsewhere in the world except Metro Richmond Zoo, Virginia, U.S. In Ostrava, these colourful primates can be watched by visiting the old primate house or the House of Evolution, a newly opened exhibit where the animals can range not only in an extensive indoor area, but also in a large outdoor enclosure, enjoying the forest setting full of trees.

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    • Rare Siberian cranes in a brand new enclosure

      01:57

      from Enrico Gombala / Added

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      A pair of large, majestic birds ranges across a new Ostrava Zoo's outdoor enclosure. Placed near the one for elephants and the Chitwan House, it shows the Siberian crane - a creature outstanding not only with its size and the bright white colour, but also with the distinctive voice that definitely attracts attention. Sadly, surveys have revealed there are less than four thousand remaining in the wild! Cranes are birds that form pairs for lifetime. Their famous "wedding dances" serve to maintain long-term bonds. The ritual involves the birds bowing before each other, spreading wings and bouncing; often a loud whooping sound can be heard. Siberian crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) is among species that are on the verge of extinction in their native range. They occur just in two separate populations that undertake far migrations between their breeding and wintering grounds. 99% of the cranes nest in Eastern Siberia, leaving the region to spend winter in Eastern China while the remainder (about 10-20 last individuals) nests in Western Siberia and flies to two small areas in Iran and India for wintering. Siberian cranes migrate in pairs or in groups of 10 individuals or less. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species manages the Siberian crane as Critically Endangered, which is the last category before entering Extinct in the Wild. Habitat loss is the crane's biggest threat - the existence of not only this majestic bird, but also other species was considerably affected by the construction of China's "Three Gorges", the world's largest dam, meaning that Siberian cranes may become another species for which breeding in captivity could become the only chance for survival...

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      • On a visit to adopted Bearded Vulture chicks

        07:18

        from Enrico Gombala / Added

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        At the beginning of April 2014 we take a short visit in Austria, in order to see 3 Bearded Vulture chicks (born in Chomutov Zoo, Liberec Zoo and Ostrava Zoo, Czech Republic) who have been successfully adopted by experienced foster pairs in Tierpark Schönbrunn, Vienna and Richard Faust Breeding Centre at Haringsee. As siblicide (the first-hatched chick kills its younger sibling through aggressive attacks) occurs in this species, the later laid second egg was taken away from the nest. When the second egg was proved to be fertilised, it was put in the incubator and the Czech zoos started to communicate intensively with the Bearded Vulture EEP coordinator, Hans Frey in order to find suitable experienced foster parents that do not have their own offspring this season. In this way, Vulture Conservation Foundation (VCF) tries to increase the number of successfully parent-reared Bearded Vulture young that can be released into the wild. Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) is sparsely distributed across the mountainous regions in Africa, mid-Asia, southern Europe and nowadays, the Alps again where this impressive bird of prey was wiped out with the last bird shot in 1913. Thanks to the Return of the Bearded Vulture in the Alps Reintroduction Project that has been running successfully since the 1980’s, and the intensive cooperation and enormous efforts of all participating institutions, i.e. 36 European zoos, specialized Bearded Vulture breeding centres, national parks in the Alps, and the World Wildlife Fund, the Bearded Vulture has returned to the Alps and its current population of about 200 birds is still growing. This project fulfils one of the most important missions of modern zoos – to contribute to the conservation of biodiversity - and at the same time, it is a real example how the environmental damage caused by the human activities can be repaired.

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        • Caribbean Flamingo courtship dance

          01:56

          from Enrico Gombala / Added

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          During a visit to the Ostrava Zoo in the Czech Republic I was lucky enough to watch a flock of Caribbean Flamingos during courtship. In the breeding season, flamingos gather in huge colonies. The birds perform displays to attract a mating partner, dancing in a sequence of moves. They might march, flag their outstretched heads back and forth, or salute with spread wings. Outside of the breeding season, flamingos live in small groups of birds. Gear used: Panasonic AG-HPX 370, Fujinon XT17x4.5BRM

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          • A Bearded Vulture young from Ostrava Zoo adopted successfully in Vienna Zoo

            08:26

            from Enrico Gombala / Added

            291 Plays / / 2 Comments

            Ostrava Zoo keeps two Bearded Vulture pairs. The older and experienced pair has been breeding successfully since 2009 and had five offspring in previous years. At the beginning of 2014, two eggs were found on their nest again during the first nest check. As siblicide (the first-hatched chick kills its younger sibling through aggressive attacks) occurs in this species, the later laid second egg was taken away from the nest. The check went without problems and the parents returned back to the nest immediately. When the second egg was proved to be fertilised, it was put in the incubator and the zoo started to communicate intensively with the Bearded Vulture EEP coordinator, Hans Frey from the RFZ Breeding Centre in Haringsee, Austria, in order to find suitable experienced foster parents that do not have their own offspring this season. In this way, Ostrava Zoo tries to increase the number of successfully parent-reared Bearded Vulture young that can be released into the wild. With respect to the development of nesting seasons of Bearded Vultures in other European institutions, the pair that was eventually chosen for adoption was an experienced couple from Tierpark Schönbrunn, Vienna. The female coming from the breeding centre in Haringsee and the male from Moscow have already reared or adopted several young. Thus on 8 March 2014, the 6-day old Bearded Vulture from Ostrava Zoo was transferred to its foster parents and placed in their nest immediately after arrival. The female was first to return to the nest, and after a little while and examination of the young she started to warm it. A few hours later, the parents responded to the behaviour of the young that was asking actively for food and they started to feed it with pieces small enough for the little beak. The adoption was successful. Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) is sparsely distributed across the mountainous regions in Africa, mid-Asia, southern Europe and nowadays, the Alps again where this impressive bird of prey was wiped out with the last bird shot in 1913. Thanks to the Return of the Bearded Vulture in the Alps Reintroduction Project that has been running successfully since the 1980’s, and the intensive cooperation and enormous efforts of all participating institutions, i.e. 36 European zoos, specialized Bearded Vulture breeding centres, national parks in the Alps, and the World Wildlife Fund, the Bearded Vulture has returned to the Alps and its current population of about 200 birds is still growing. This project fulfils one of the most important missions of modern zoos – to contribute to the conservation of biodiversity - and at the same time, it is a real example how the environmental damage caused by the human activities can be repaired.

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            • Bearded Vulture Mating

              02:35

              from Enrico Gombala / Added

              283 Plays / / 6 Comments

              I watched mating of bearded vulture in Ostrava Zoo, Czech Republic. The local zoo has been dedicated to managing the Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus aureus) since 2004. Within the project "The Return of the Bearded Vulture into the Alps", Ostrava zoo has provided so far a total of seven chicks for release into the wild. The project aims to strengthen the wild population of this majestic alpine predator, which was in the past completely wiped out by a man. Gear used: Panasonic AG-HPX 370, Fujinon XT17x4.5BRM, AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4

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              • Vultures Return

                10:02

                from Enrico Gombala / Added

                192 Plays / / 4 Comments

                On Monday, 25 November 2013, young Griffon Vulture from Ostrava Zoo, took his journey to the Green Balkans Wildlife Rehabilitation and Breeding Centre in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria. Raptor will be released back into the wild within Vultures Return reintroduction program coordinated by Green Balkans. This is a two year bird (born in Ostrava 5 May 2012), which is the first Griffon Vulture in the history of the Ostrava Zoo that has been released for the restoration program. Young vulture will spend the winter in quarantine aviary at Rescue Centre Green Balkans in Stara Zagora. At the moment, a group of about 35 griffon vultures, that were imported from Spain, makes him company. The whole group will move in the spring of the following year to one of the four adaptation aviaries spaced throughout the Stara Planina mountain. After several months of stay in the local adaptation aviary, the Griffon Vultures will be released in their former ranges in the Balkan Mountains.

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                • Two Bearded Vultures from Ostrava Zoo have settled in the Alpi Marittime Nature Park

                  09:31

                  from Enrico Gombala / Added

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                  Two young Bearded Vultures (Gypaetus barbatus), which hatched in late winter in the Zoological Garden in Ostrava, were released on Saturday, 19 May 2012 into the wild in the Italian Alps. In agreement with the coordinator of breeding bearded vultures – Dr. Hans Frey, ALPI MARITTIME Nature Park in Italy became a new home for young predators. Young predators are currently fine, staying close to releasing place from which they make only short trips around the neighborhood. Nature Park staff, along with volunteer guardians of nature, patrol the birds 24 hours a day. Within the project "The Return of the Bearded Vulture into the Alps", Ostrava zoo has provided so far a total of seven chicks for release into the wild. The project aims to strengthen the wild population of this majestic alpine predator, which was in the past completely wiped out by a man.

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                  • Two Bearded Vultures were released into the Alpi Marittime Nature Park

                    12:25

                    from Enrico Gombala / Added

                    537 Plays / / 1 Comment

                    Two young Bearded Vultures (Gypaetus barbatus), which hatched in late winter in the Zoological Garden in Ostrava, were released on Saturday, 19 May 2012 into the wild in the Italian Alps. In agreement with the coordinator of breeding bearded vultures – Dr. Hans Frey, ALPI MARITTIME Nature Park in Italy became a new home for young predators. Within the project "The Return of the Bearded Vulture into the Alps", Ostrava zoo has provided so far a total of seven chicks for release into the wild. The project aims to strengthen the wild population of this majestic alpine predator, which was in the past completely wiped out by a man.

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                    • Papua varans in Ostrava Zoo

                      04:04

                      from Enrico Gombala / Added

                      143 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      At the end of April 2011, a new exhibition of Papua was opened in Ostrava Zoo. Exhibition brings visitors natural beauty of tropical island, Papua - New Guinea and a local endangered species of reptiles and fish. Visitors can observe the tree lizards, among other things - Papua varans. Feeding of these animals takes place approximately once every ten days.

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