1. London Erlang User Group - RabbitMQ and multi-protocol messaging: Brett Cameron & Eric Newcomer

    01:17:00

    from Erlang Solutions / Added

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    Speakers: Brett Cameron & Eric Newcomer RabbitMQ is a popular 100% Erlang-based Open Source message queuing system that implements the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP). It has been estimated that there are 35,000+ production deployments of RabbitMQ across the globe, and this number is continuing to grow. Most of these deployments are business-critical, underpinning everything from internet-based pizza ordering systems through to providing the central nervous system for OpenStack-based cloud deployments. RabbitMQ natively supports version 0.9.1 of AMQP; however, a somewhat overlooked capability of RabbitMQ is its ability to also readily provide support via a flexible plugin architecture for a variety other popular Open Source message queuing protocols, including STOMP, MQTT, and RESTful messaging via the RabbitHub plugin. Most good message queuing protocols share many features in common; however some are better suited to a particular set of use cases than others. This ability of RabbitMQ to seamlessly receive and propagate messages simultaneously via multiple protocols is an extremely powerful facility, and one that affords great flexibility. For example, it means that it is possible to use the most appropriate protocol for a particular function or to simultaneously use different protocols to disseminate the same data to different types of users via the most appropriate protocol without having to develop and maintain any separate gateway components. Having been involved with the early days of the AMQP working group, and having written books in related areas, Eric Newcomer will start by talking a little about the history of AMQP (the primary protocol used by RabbitMQ) and about message queuing in general. Brett Cameron will then discuss the multi-protocol features of RabbitMQ and how the capabilities of Erlang have been utilised to implement the powerful RabbitMQ plugin architecture. An overview of the plugin architecture will be presented along with examples of its use to implement a robust and highly scalable multi-protocol Open Source messaging hub. The talk will end with a few future-looking thoughts and a Q&A session. About Brett Cameron Brett Cameron works as a senior software engineer at VMS Software Inc. (VSI, http://www.vmssoftware.com/index.html), helping to define and implement the company’s Open Source strategy for the OpenVMS operating system. Before joining VSI Brett worked as a senior software architect with HP’s Cloud and Enterprise Services groups. Brett lives in Christchurch, New Zealand and has worked in the software industry since 1992, and in that time he has gained experience in a wide range of technologies, many of which have long since been retired to the software scrapheap of dubious ideas. Over the past decade Brett has spent considerable time travelling the world helping organisations to modernize their legacy application environments and to better leverage Open Source technologies. In more recent times, his involvement with various Open Source projects and his work in the cloud computing space has caused him to develop a liking for functional programming languages, and Erlang in particular, which he has ported to several exotic operating systems such as OpenVMS, to which he has also ported various Erlang applications such as RabbitMQ and Riak. Brett holds a doctorate in chemical physics from the University of Canterbury, and maintains close links with the University, delivering guest lectures and acting as an advisor to the Computer Science and Electronic and Computer Engineering departments on course structure and content. In his spare time Brett enjoys listening to music, playing the guitar, and drinking beer. About Eric Newcomer Eric is global head of Architecture and Validation Management Services for Citi's Treasury and Trade Services division. Before that he was Chief Architect, Investment Banking IT, at Credit Suisse. And before that he was CTO at IONA Technologies, where among other activities he helped create the AMQP Consortium and served as a founding member. He was also a Consulting Engineer at Digital Equipment Corporation in the capacity of Transaction Processing Architect, among other things part of the committee that created the XA standard. At IONA he helped create Web services and also co-authored the WS-Transactions specification, for which he should not really take all the blame.

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    • Lambda Days 2015 - Alvaro Videla - Dissecting the Rabbit: RabbitMQ Internal Architecture

      47:43

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      Alvaro Videla Co-Author of RabbitMQ in Action Alvaro Videla works as Developer Advocate for RabbitMQ/Pivotal. Before moving to Europe he used to work in Shanghai where he helped building one of Germany biggest dating websites. He co-authored the book ""RabbitMQ in Action"" for Manning Publishing. Some of his open source projects can be found here: http://github.com/videlalvaro. Apart from code related stuff he likes traveling with his wife, listening/playing music and reading books. You can find him on Twitter as @old_sound. Dissecting the Rabbit: RabbitMQ Internal Architecture The talk aims to show how RabbitMQ uses Erlang/OTP to build a message broker. We will go through ""a day in the life of a message"" to explore the different patterns used by RabbitMQ to handle message ingres, routing and message delivery. We are going to go over areas like: - How Erlang Pattern Matching is used to implement the AMQP protocol. - RabbitMQ Boot System: How does the broker boots until it's ready to accept messages. - A day in the life of a message: The path a message takes while passing across RabbitMQ. - Flow Control for Erlang Processes and the Credit Flow implementation. - Supervisor Trees, RabbitMQ own behaviours and more.

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      • Alvaro Videla: Building a Distributed Data Ingestion System with RabbitMQ

        52:48

        from WEBdeBS / Added

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        Your company has servers distributed around the world and you need to process data in a centralised location. The data is produced by applications using different technology stacks and comes from various sources, from web servers to sensors. How could you solve this problem? Enter RabbitMQ. In this talk we are going to show how to build a system that can ingest data produced at separate geo located areas (think AWS and it's many regions) and replicate it to a central cluster where it can be further processed and analysed. We will present an example of how to build a system like this one by using RabbitMQ Federation to replicate data across AWS Regions and RabbitMQ support for many protocols to produce/consume data. To help with scalability we are going to show an interesting way to implement sharded queues with RabbitMQ by using the Consistent Hash Exchange. If you want to learn what else has RabbitMQ to offer beyond simple messaging and queueing, then this is the talk for you.

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        • Alvaro Videla - Building a Distributed Data Ingestion System with RabbitMQ

          42:52

          from Erlang Solutions / Added

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          Building a Distributed Data Ingestion System with RabbitMQ Your company has servers distributed around the world and you need to process data in a centralised location. The data is produced by applications using different technology stacks and comes from various sources, from web servers to sensors. How could you solve this problem? Enter RabbitMQ. In this talk we are going to show how to build a system that can ingest data produced at separate geo located area (think AWS and it's many regions) and replicate it to a central cluster where it can be further processed and analysed. We will present an example of how to build a system like this one by using RabbitMQ Federation to replicate data across AWS Regions and RabbitMQ support for many protocols to produce/consume data. To help with scalability we are going to show an interesting way to implement sharded queues with RabbitMQ by using the Consistent Hash Exchange. If you want to learn what else has RabbitMQ to offer beyond simple messaging and queueing, then this is the talk for you.

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          • Keep Calm and Ship Services, CF Summit 2014

            27:38

            from Tammer Saleh / Added

            67 Plays / / 0 Comments

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            • Dissecting the Rabbit. RabbitMQ internal architecture, Alvaro Videla (Pivotal Inc)

              59:26

              from Ontico / Added

              466 Plays / / 0 Comments

              RabbitMQ is a Messaging and Queueing server implemented in Erlang. This talk will explore how RabbitMQ uses Erlang and OTP to build a highly reliable message broker. We are going to review areas such as: RabbitMQ Boot System: How does the broker boots until it's ready to accept messages. A day in the life of a message: The path a message takes while passing across RabbitMQ. RabbitMQ's own message store: persistent messages, transient messages and the in memory cache for fast delivery. Supervisor Trees, RabbitMQ own behaviors and more. If you ever wondered what goes inside a robust Erlang application then this is the talk toattend.

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              • Taming the Rabbit - Writing RabbitMQ Plugins, Alvaro Videla (Cloud Foundry at VMware)

                50:58

                from Ontico / Added

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                RabbitMQ is a Messaging and Queueing server that works with the AMQP protocol. But what happens if we want to use the server beyond AMQP? What if we want to replace its own storage engine or provide new authentication methods? All of that can be done why writing new plugins for RabbitMQ in Erlang. In this talk we are going to present various plugins for RabbitMQ and we will show how to extend the broker by adding new routing algorithms with custom exchange types. The code examples will be in Erlang.

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                • bunny devcast

                  07:47

                  from John Davison / Added

                  17 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  bunny messaging queue management tool

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                  • Alvaro Videla - Developer Advocate for RabbitMQ, Pivotal

                    01:16

                    from Erlang Solutions / Added

                    50 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Interview from Code Mesh 2013

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                    • Jan Macháček - Akka in Heterogenous Environments

                      55:55

                      from Erlang Solutions / Added

                      83 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Code Mesh London is the best place in Europe for non-mainstream tech and programming languages. On 4-5 December 2013 over 50 inventors and originators of the most innovative languages and technologies of the moment shared their experience with 200 attendees. Topics included Scala, Haskell, Clojure, Erlang, Elixir, Julia and much more. See you at Code Mesh 2014! codemesh.io/ About the talk: Jan will show how to use RabbitMQ to connect components on different platforms. After a few introductory slides explaining the main concepts, the rest of the talk will be live code. The coding will begin by showing simple Scala / Akka code to connect to RabbitMQ to send and receive messages--think "java.lang.String" values back and forth to start with. We will then increase the complexity of the messages and marshal the messages into JSON. Jan will then show the real power of messaging infrastructures by replacing the RPC server component by native code in C++: we will write image processing component. To make matters even better--faster--we will then use CUDA to perform the image processing. Come to Jan's talk and demo if you want to find out how to use Scala, Akka and RabbitMQ in the core of your application, especially if your application needs to tie together code on completely different platforms and if it performs heavy number crunching or image processing. You do not need to have deep knowledge of Scala, Akka, RabbitMQ, Boost, OpenCV, ...; all that you will need is your _inner geek_.

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