1. 2014 April / Hibakusha Stories: Q & A

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    from East River Films Added 1 0 0

    NAGASAKI MAYOR ATTENDS CONVERSATION BETWEEN A-BOMB SURVIVORS, PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S GRANDSON AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ~Atomic Bomb Survivors Meet Harry Truman’s Grandson: Sharing Personal Stories~ 17min 03 secs, HD, in English & Japanese with English Interpretation Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 9:30 am-11:00 am EST, at Japan Society New York, NY – More than 69 years after President Harry S. Truman authorized the use of atomic bombs on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, stories from survivors resonate with young generations as they learn about the complexities and cataclysms of World War II. On Tuesday, April 29, invited high school groups from the New York City-area visit Japan Society to hear first-hand accounts of the bombings and reflect on the events that brought them to pass. Organized by the U.N. affiliated NGO Hibakusha Stories, two hibakusha (atomic bomb survivors), Ms. Reiko Yamada of Hiroshima and Mr. Michio Hakariya of Nagasaki share remembrances and personal testimonies. President Truman’s grandson, Mr. Clifton Truman Daniel recounts his personal journey toward understanding the bombings, including encounters with survivors during recent trips to Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Mr. Tomihisa Taue, Mayor of Nagasaki will be among special guests at the event. Presented By Japan Society, Youth Arts New York, Hibakusha Stories, Peace Boat Interpreters: Rachel Clark & Marie Cochrane Videotaped & Edited By East River Films Inc 2014 © East River Films Inc, All Rights Reserved World Wide

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    • 2014 April / Hibakusha Stories: Michio Hakariya

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      NAGASAKI MAYOR ATTENDS CONVERSATION BETWEEN A-BOMB SURVIVORS, PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S GRANDSON AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ~Atomic Bomb Survivors Meet Harry Truman’s Grandson: Sharing Personal Stories~ 24min 32 secs, HD, in Japanese with English Interpretation Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 9:30 am-11:00 am EST, at Japan Society Michio Hakariya was at his house located 3.8 km away from the hypocenter when he experienced the bomb flash and bomb blast. He sought refuge in an air-raid shelter nearby and avoided further exposure to radiation. After the war he taught in high schools for 36 years. Participation in the 2nd Peace Boat Hibakusha Project in fall 2009 was the starting point for him to start telling his story. Mr. Hakariya joined the Nagasaki Foundation for the Promotion of Peace to give his testimony, and he continues to talk about the true nature of nuclear weapons to young people, traveling himself to South East Asia and around the world to do so. New York, NY – More than 69 years after President Harry S. Truman authorized the use of atomic bombs on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, stories from survivors resonate with young generations as they learn about the complexities and cataclysms of World War II. On Tuesday, April 29, invited high school groups from the New York City-area visit Japan Society to hear first-hand accounts of the bombings and reflect on the events that brought them to pass. Organized by the U.N. affiliated NGO Hibakusha Stories, two hibakusha (atomic bomb survivors), Ms. Reiko Yamada of Hiroshima and Mr. Michio Hakariya of Nagasaki share remembrances and personal testimonies. President Truman’s grandson, Mr. Clifton Truman Daniel recounts his personal journey toward understanding the bombings, including encounters with survivors during recent trips to Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Mr. Tomihisa Taue, Mayor of Nagasaki will be among special guests at the event. Presented By Japan Society, Youth Arts New York, Hibakusha Stories, Peace Boat Interpreter: Rachel Clark Videotaped & Edited By East River Films Inc 2014 © East River Films Inc, All Rights Reserved World Wide

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      • Star Mine

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        from Rachel Clark Added 20 1 0

        This short film shows the Rachel Clark abstract oil painting 'Star Mine' filmed in close-up. It is from her abstract painting series Transitions. http://www.rachelclark.com/abstract-paintings/abstract-gallery/

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        • Transition

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          from Rachel Clark Added 19 0 0

          This short film shows the Rachel Clark abstract oil painting 'Transition' filmed in close-up. It is from her abstract painting series Transitions. http://www.rachelclark.com/abstract-paintings/abstract-gallery/

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          • LAST SONGS

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            from Rachel Clark Added 23 0 0

            This short film shows the Rachel Clark abstract oil painting 'Last Songs' filmed in close-up. It is from her abstract painting series Transitions. http://www.rachelclark.com/abstract-paintings/abstract-gallery/

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            • Sign III

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              from Rachel Clark Added 22 0 0

              This short film shows the Rachel Clark abstract oil painting 'Sign III' filmed in close-up. It is from her abstract painting series Testament. http://www.rachelclark.com/abstract-paintings/abstract-gallery/

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              • Lot's Wife 'CLOSE UP'

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                from Rachel Clark Added 52 0 0

                This short film shows the Rachel Clark abstract oil painting, 'Lot's Wife', filmed in close up.

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                • Follow up on Fukushima Crisis: Post 3.11 Issues

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                  from East River Films Added 723 0 1

                  *If you like this video and our efforts, please kindly donate to Cinema Forum Fukushima. You can securely pay your donation through the link below: https://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/fiscal/profile?id=6238 The Coalition of NGOs presents, in association with the Fukushima Action Project "Follow up on Fukushima Crisis" January 29th, 2014, at United Nation Chapel in New York City "Before We Listen to Yaichan's Story: Post 3.11 Issues" 50 min 21 sec, HD, in English Presenter: Rachel Clark, Peace Boat US About the Presenters: Rachel Clark: Originally from Japan, Rachel Clark holds a degree in International Studies from Ramapo College of New Jersey. In 2010, she was chosen to be an interpreter for 150 Hibakusha delegates to the UN NPT Conference, a turning point in her career after which she became devoted to a nuclear-free world and sustainable development. In 2012, Rachel joined Peace Boat US as a volunteer staff member as she continued to be involved in various anti-nuclear weapons/energy activities. The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster further deepened her commitment to nuclear non-proliferation as she became involved in post-Fukushima radiation issues. As an independent interpreter, her language capacity has been utilized in various nuclear related events: she supported Dr. Sakiyama at Dr. Helen Caldicott’s Symposium this past March, and former Prime Minister of Japan Naoto Kan at the Coalition Against Nuke’s Symposium this October. As a Communication Coordinator on the 79th Voyage of Peace Boat, she interpreted at the Onboard Conference for a Nuclear Power Free World and translated its final resolution. Currently Rachel resides in New Jersey, as she balances her job as an interpreter, global coordinator, and a volunteer staff member of Peace Boat US New York office. Yayoi Hitomi: Ms. Hitomi is a resident of Fukushima and secretariat member of the Fukushima Action Project, as well as a member of the Fukushima Network to Save Children. She is also a writer for the Fukushima local newspaper and web master of “Women in Fukushima Against Nuclear Power.” About the Sponsors: Peace Boat US: Peace Boat US works to build a culture of peace around the world by connecting people across borders and creating opportunities for learning, activism and cooperation. We achieve this through programs in which people from the US and around the world participate in voyages onboard the Peace Boat, our Japan-based partner organization and one of the most unique and creative peace-building initiatives in the world. Programs combine learning, activism, advocacy and travel, allowing participants to experience the reality of global issues such as the impact of war, environmental degradation, gender violence, poverty and other issues. Participants learn through immersion in grassroots peace-building that is the Peace Boat experience. http://www.peaceboat-us.org Coalition of NGOs: Peace Boat US, United Methodist Women, NGO Committee on Sustainable Development, NGO Committee on Human Rights, NGO Committee on Disarmament Peace and Security, Global Family, International Council of Women, United Religions Initiative, Unitarian Universalist United Nations Office The Fukushima Action Project: The Fukushima Action Project was established following the IAEA’s (International Atomic Energy Agency) announcement that it would establish a research centre in Fukushima Prefecture in 2013 focused on decontamination and health management. It also held a Ministerial Meeting on Nuclear Safety at Big Palette in Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture on December 15-17, 2012. The Fukushima Action Project aims to raise awareness about these issues, and to provide opportunities for local citizens to learn about what the IAEA is, how it functions as an institution and what purpose the information and the research collected at the IAEA serves. The Fukushima Action Project aims to enable those affected by the TEPCO Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant disaster to monitor the IAEA plans in Fukushima, and ensure that their demands are delivered and that the IAEA research activities are conducted to be for the benefit of the people. Conveying the fundamental proactive message of the local citizens to protect their own and their children’s health, lives and futures, it also plans to lobby the IAEA, Japanese Government and Fukushima Prefecture to conduct their utmost efforts to truly put an end the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster, and prevent “another Fukushima” from ever being repeated. http://npfree.jp/english.html *If you like this video, please kindly donate to Cinema Forum Fukushima. You can securely pay your donation through the link below: https://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/fiscal/profile?id=6238 Videotaped & Edited by East River Films Inc 2014 All Rights Reserved

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                  • The Story Part 2: Storyline

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                    from Bridgeway Christian Added 416 1 0

                    Learn about the importance of your story to our church family and community, as we watch and discuss testimonies from Pastor Lance Hahn, Eric Camera, and Someca Berthea. There's also a special event with worship leader Ali K and the band, rapper Lyle Day and artist Danny Panasuik. Hosted by Pastor Ryan Haynes and Rachel Clark (Bridgeway's Director of Communication Arts)

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                    • vol. 3/5. Why Can't They Relocate? Fukushima's Dilemma

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                      from East River Films Added 51 1 0

                      Q & A 2/2 Kazumi WATANABE, Mammy Z Tummy Project For Fukushima Rachel Clark, Interpreter Mari INOUE, Esq., Human Rights Now New York HD, 26 min 43 sec, in Japanese with English Interpretation ~Why Can't They Relocate? Fukushima's Dilemma~ What are the political, social, cultural, and financial factors that keep many families remain in Fukushima after the nuclear accident in 2011? WHAT: Attorneys of a Tokyo-based international human rights organization and a founder of a temporary rescue facility for Fukushima families and children with disability or illness will speak about how the lives of local citizens were affected by the ongoing nuclear crisis in Fukushima. They will analyze how political, social, cultural and financial factors played important roles in keeping many families in contaminated areas in Fukushima, and discuss how civil societies could support and protect citizens in affected areas after a nuclear disaster. A short film of "recreation projects" in Japan -- grassroots projects to provide short-term recreation opportunities in less contaminated areas for families with children to reduce accumulated dosage of radiation -- will be shown. A discussion session with audience will follow after presentations. WHERE: ING Direct Café at 968 3rd Avenue (58th St.), 2nd Fl, NY, NY 10155‎ WHEN: Friday, October 26, 2012, 7PM-9PM. WHO: Ms. Kazumi Watanabe, Mammy z Tummy Project for Fukushima, Japan; Satoshi Nishida, Esq., Human Rights Now; Mari Inoue, Esq., Human Rights Now. BACKGROUND: A year and a half after the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, there are still many families with children who live in highly contaminated areas for various reasons even if they are concerned about the health effects from radiation exposure. Many citizens are struggling financially and unable to relocate to outside of Fukushima without a proper assistance from the government. Fukushima families' unique ties with neighbors, relatives and friends in their communities sometimes prevent them to evacuate from contaminated areas. Some families with members who have a disability or chronic illness do not have capacity to relocate to a new community. In order to assist those families from highly contaminated areas in Fukushima, many Japanese nonprofit organizations and grassroots organizations established "hoyo projects" or recreation projects to provide them with temporary group homes, so that their children could enjoy short-term recreation opportunities in less contaminated areas while reducing their accumulated dosage of radiation. However, these projects are now facing challenges. SPONSORING ORGANIZATION: HUMAN RIGHTS NOW: Human Rights Now (HRN) is an international NGO based in Tokyo with more than 700 members, composed of lawyers, scholars and journalists. HRN dedicates itself to the protection and promotion of human rights. To raise awareness of the situation in Fukushima after the nuclear accident, HRN organized a human rights forum in March 2012 at the UN Church Center in conjunction with the 56th United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. Mothers and children who were evacuated from Fukushima spoke about the great and ongoing disruption of their lives. Our goal is to inform the international community about the ongoing crisis and advocate for the protection of communities in Japan. IN COOPERATION WITH: MAMMY Z TUMMY PROJECT FOR FUKUSHIMA: Mammy z Tummy for Fukushima is a grassroots organization established in 2011 after the nuclear accident in Fukushima. The organization provides a temporary rescue facility in a relatively less contaminated area in Fukushima to support families who are unable to evacuate or participate in recreation projects outside of Fukushima due to their children's disability or illness. More information, please visit Cinema Forum Fukushima website: http://wp.me/p2g2dl-dl 2012 Copy Rights, East River Films Inc

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