1. Pulse room by RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER

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    from Anita B Johansson / Added

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    Exhibited at Bildmuseet, Umeå, Sweden 26th of November 2014.

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    • Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Under Scan, Brayford University Campus, Lincoln, UK, 2005.

      10:05

      from studio international / Added

      Under Scan. East Midlands Development Agency, Brayford University Campus, Lincoln, United Kingdom, 2005.

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      • "Open Air", (2012) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

        03:37

        from bitforms gallery / Added

        Rafael Lozano-Hemmer "Open Air", Sep 20 – Oct 14, 2012 Relational Architecture 19 outdoor public art installation commissioned by the Association for Public Art; Philadelphia, PA dimensions variable Open Air is a large, interactive public art installation that activates 24 robotic searchlights placed along a half-mile section of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway – creating enormous three-dimensional light formations in the night sky. Using a free custom-made mobile app designed by the artist, the voices and GPS positions of participants generate its content, in a ‘crowdsourced’ experience of public space and urban connection.

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        • "Nave Solar," (2011) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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          Rafael Lozano-Hemmer "Nave Solar", 2011 projectors, computers, surveillance cameras, PA system, steel-aluminium-plasterboard sphere, custom-made software running Navier-Stokes, Perlin noise, fractal flames and reaction-diffusion equations dimensions variable (sphere 19.7 ft / 6 m in diameter) Nave Solar is an interactive installation designed for the former convent of San Diego, site of the catholic inquisition in Mexico City, now Laboratorio Arte Alameda. A six meter in diameter sphere hangs from the dome of the interior of the church, half the size of the nave itself. Projected onto the sphere is a real time simulation of the activity that occurs on the solar corona, the upper atmosphere of the sun. The images projected on the sphere are generated by mathematical equations that engender turbulence, flares, ejections and sunspots, mixed with more recent imagery obtained by NASA's solar observatories. A camera detects the movement of the public, feeding the equations so that the behaviour of the sphere changes depending on the activity in the exhibition hall. The Sun has 11 different seasons each of which also has its own parametric sound environment. From this "fake sun" a rope hangs to the floor level of the nave. This rope allows visitors to swing over the entire nave and their pendular motion influences the solar equations above: if no one participates the Sun is quiet and calm, as there is movement the projections get more turbulent and the Sun begings to rotate along its vertical axis. The shadow of participants is projected onto the apse of the church and a second tracking system automatically generates smoke which is mapped onto the architecture in such a way that it accumulates on the ceiling of the apse. The installation is inspired by the Christian Botafumeiro, the Foucault pendulum demonstrating the rotation of the earth, or the form of torture and execution of the Inquisition that Edgar Allan Poe described in his 1842 story "The Pit and the Pendulum". Nave Solar is designed to evoke the myth of Icarus, the TV games of Luis Manuel Pelayo, and the synchronization of pendulum clocks that Huygens discovered in 1665.

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          • "First Surface," (2012) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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            Rafael Lozano-Hemmer First Surface, 2012 Shadow Object 3 computer, kinect, projector, metal, motor, arduino processor, front surface mirrors projection: 68.9 x 48" / 175 x 122 cm wall mount: 28.4 x 17.3 x 11.8" / 72 x 44 x 30 cm edition of 6 First Surface is the third installation from Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s "Shadow Object" series of works, which feature objects with animated, alien shadows. Two front surface mirrors are suspended from a thread and move with the air flow and with a small motor. Projected on the wall behind the mirrors is a real-time virtual representation of the public as seen from the perspective of the mirrors. The public is represented as patterned 3D silhouettes anchored in a reference prism that rotates with the mirrors. The piece is an "apocatoptron" (derived from the Greek Apo- for "away from" and katoptron, for "mirror"), an attempt to construct an artificial perspective on the reflected subject.

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            • "Airborne," (2013) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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              from bitforms gallery / Added

              Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Airborne, 2013 Relational Architecture 20 Projectors, computers, surveillance cameras, PA system, custom-made software running Navier-Stokes equations 98.4 x 98.4 ft / 30 x 30 m “Airborne” was an interactive installation by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer designed to transform a 900 square metre wall in Norfolk’s public space into a poetic shadow play. Participants blocked the light of two powerful projectors casting their shadows on the wall, and these were tracked by computerized surveillance systems. Out of the shadows emanated bellowing smoke which was mapped onto the wall and accumulated in it. Readable within the smoke were clouds of text, themselves turbulent, from salient poetic texts on light and shadow by Dylan Thomas, John Ashbery, Nicole Brossard, William Blake, Wallace Stevens, Adrian Matejka, Kathy Acker and other poets. In the installation each poem could be heard declaimed, often by the actual poet, while its text was converted into smoke by passers-by.

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              • "Friend Fracker", (2013) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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                Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Friend Fracker, 2013 Facebook API website Friendfracker is a service that automatically deletes a set of friends from your Facebook account. Upon authenticating your data on the website, the service deletes 1 to 10 friends at random. The project was developed with Harper Reed in one day for Rhizome's 7 on 7 conference. Note: facebook disabled the API key for the project on April 25, 2013. Q: Will friendfracker protect my privacy? A: Yes, the service uses facebook's standard authentication and security. We do not get access to your password or private information. Q: How do I know which friends were deleted? A: You don't and neither do we, that is part of the fun and frustration. Q: Will my deleted friends be notified? A: No. Q: Can the damage be undone? A: No. However, you can re-friend the people if you really want. Q: Will friendfracker keep messing with my friends? A: No. The service works on a one-time basis and will leave your data alone after.

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                • "Voice Tunnel", (2013) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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                  from bitforms gallery / Added

                  Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Voice Tunnel, 2013 Relational Architecture 21 Custom-software, 300x 750W source four spotlights, ETC dimmer racks, speakers, computers, 22 miles of Socapex power cable, 2.5 miles of fiber optic cable, 2 miles of XLR cable, 4 generators each suppling 500 Amps, microphone, custom hardware. 1,400 ft / 427 m Voice Tunnel” is a large-scale interactive installation designed to transform the Park Avenue Tunnel during the “Summer Streets” Annual Celebration in New York City. The tunnel goes from 33rd to 40th streets and is open for pedestrians for the first time in its almost 200 year history. The piece consists of 300 powerful theatrical spotlights that produce columns of light along the walls and cladding of the tunnel. All fixtures are floormounted right beside the walls, seven feet from each other, shining past the spring line, fading along the internal curved surface of the tunnel, just reaching its crown. The intensity of each light is automatically controlled by the voice recording of a participant who speaks into a special intercom that is in the middle of the tunnel. Silence is interpreted as zero intensity and speech modulates the brightness proportionally, creating a morse-like code of flashes. Once a recording is finished, the computer plays it back as a loop, both in the light fixtures that are closest to the intercom as well as on an inline loudspeaker. As new people participate, old recordings get pushed away by one position down the array of lights. So that the “memory” of the installation is always getting recycled, with the oldest recordings on the edge of the tunnel and the newest ones in the middle. At any given time the tunnel is illuminated by the voices of 75 visitors. Once 75 people participate after you, your own recording disappears from the tunnel, like a memento mori. The voices can be heard through an array of 150 loud-speakers placed along the tunnel, in perfect synchronicity to the blinking lights that are near-by. The effect of the project is not cacaphonous because each speaker does not play all 75 recordings, it only plays the voices from lights that are immediately beside it.

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                  • "Pulse Drip", (2012) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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                    from bitforms gallery / Added

                    Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Pulse Drip, 2012 outdoor public art installation rapid prototyping resin, custom circuitry, arduino processor, solenoid valve, water nozzle valve box: 14 x 22 x 22 cm garden hose up to 10 m long edition of 6 Interactive installation originally developed for Urdaibai Art 2012 in which the public can water the lawn at the Torre de Madariaga using a water hose with a heart rate sensor built-in. To participate, visitors take the hose wherever they want to water: by putting their index finger on a tiny sensor on the spray head, his or her pulse is detected and an automated electromechanical valve controls the water flow to match the beat of the participant's heart. The spray head is a custom-made handle with a built-in heartbeat sensor, a rechargeable battery, a radio transmitter and an Arduino processor.

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                    • "Nineteen Eighty-Four" (2014) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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                      Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Nineteen Eighty-Four, 2014 Computer, display, arduino processor, potentiometer, OLED pushbuttons, aluminium and steel frame 44.5 x 133.5 x 13.5 cm edition of 6 "Nineteen Eighty-Four," is an interactive display that shows house address numbers extracted from Google Street View images. The numbers have an immense variety of fonts, colours, textures and styles, as they were scanned by Google from the front doors of buildings from all over the World. The display writes over 22 billion different combinations of the number 1984; these combinations change automatically at a speed that can be set using a dial, from one different image every ten seconds to ten images per second. At the default speed, it will take around 1,000 years for the same combination of images to be repeated. Typing any number onto an onboard animated keyboard starts a fast count-down or count-up until eventually the number 1984 is reached. At that point, the display resumes cycling through different combinations of images to make variations on 1984.

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