1. Richard Twedt - Fractured Illumination

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    Richard Twedt - Fractured Illumination, 2015 Site-Specific Video Installation Dimension variable

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    • Richard Twedt - Fractured Illumination

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      Richard Twedt - Fractured Illumination

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      • JAMES PERKINS at ACE GALLERY Beverly Hills

        08:57

        from jamesperkinsstudio / Added

        In his first solo exhibition at Ace Gallery, James Perkins eloquently confronts money and its societal impact as an undeniably universal and unifying human experience of perception and emotion, worthy of singular artistic inquiry. Through the textile paintings and sculptures in Speculation, Perkins reflects this universal ethos through the use of mirror as looking glass. Using the suiting and shirting fabrics from his time spent on Wall Street, Perkins examines the viewer’s perception of value qua value while simultaneously channeling a historical dialogue with artistic forbearers such as Duchamp (use of the ready-made), Frank Stella (stripes and linearity) and Andy Warhol (money as the subject matter, theme and desired outcome of work). Perkins seeks to engage the viewer in the theme and heritage of perception itself. He contemplates the perception of feeling by Rothko, the perception of light and space by Turrell, the perception of scale and sculpture by Serra, the perception of fame by Warhol, the perception of color and material by Judd, the perception of art itself by Duchamp or Irwin, the perception of death by Hirst, the perception of masculinity by Young, the perception of femininity by Emin, the perception of action via Pollock, the perception of human existence by Bacon, or the perception of the banal by Koons. For Perkins, the perception of money and value in our society is necessarily a study of the gestures of success and failure, where common notions of these perceptions can be immediately turned on their head.

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        • Robert Irwin • Sinbad the Traveling Salesman

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          from Penn Humanities Forum / Added

          March 29, 2007 | Penn Humanities Forum on Travel, 2006-2007 More on this event: http://humanities.sas.upenn.edu/events/sinbad-traveling-salesman

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          • SURFACE TO AIR : LOS ANGELES ARTISTS OF THE 60S AND THE MATERIALS THAT THEY USED

            09:06

            from ERIC MINH SWENSON / Added

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            Film by Eric Minh Swenson. Music by Shane Guffogg. Kayne Griffin Corcoran is pleased to present Surface to Air: Los Angeles Artists of the ‘60s and the Materials that they used, curated by Robert Dean. This exhibition devotes itself to artists working in Los Angeles in the 1960s who shared certain commonalities in their use of materials and fabrication techniques that, for the most part, were specific to the environs of Southern California. Artists include Peter Alexander, Hobie Alter, Kenneth Anger, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Judy Chicago, Ron Cooper, Ron Davis, Robert Irwin, Craig Kauffman, John McCracken, Ken Price, Ed Roth and Ed Ruscha. The ‘60s Los Angeles culture of surf, sun and space brought with it the influence of new technologies, grasped by these artists as fresh resources to approach questions of process, form, and finish. In the late ‘60s John Coplans applied the moniker “finish fetish” to these particular artists and in some ways it is an appropriate appellation—if we limit ourselves to discussions of this use of materials and techniques as a means to an end. However, this term is just as misleading as it is helpful, and like most terms applied to groups of artists by critics eager to discover new trends, the artists themselves have generally abhorred it. Still, all painting is surface, so Coplans may have a point when considering these surfaces of nonillusory condition. We are considering for the most part artists who had created objects that exist primarily as objects—and some crafting objects that have a sense of nonmateriality. In bringing these artists together, Surface to Air will examine not only the similarities between their work, but also the consequential divergence from one another in their practice—both because of, and in spite of, the nature of their shared context. While artists such as Billy Al Bengston and John McCracken celebrated the surface of objects, others—Larry Bell, Robert Irwin, Craig Kauffman, and to a large degree Peter Alexander and Ron Cooper—were interested in the interplay of light, optics, color and transparency within the object. Ron Davis riffed on his own brand of abstract expressionism and color field painting, and Ken Price obsessed over the geometry of skin articulated in his distinct blocks of color. Bengston and Judy Chicago employed recognizable motifs and patterning that often related to motorcycles and hot rods, and in their fascination with surface polish McCracken’s planks and Kauffman’s pinstriped vacuum-formed plastics recall surfboards. Kauffman also produced images of an abstract geometry and later explored issues of translucence, fabricating with a precision objects that were inspired in part by the work of László Moholy-Nagy. Meanwhile Irwin attempted, after an endeavor into abstract pointillism, the pursuit of no imagery; no illusion at all. Rather, this work became about the perception of an object in light and space whose significance was divided equally between the object itself and the light and shadows it would cast. This context, and indeed the artwork being produced by these artists, may be contrasted within the broader throes of East Coast Pop Art and Minimalism occurring at the same time. Drawing this comparison, Robert Irwin stated, “We saw it and they didn’t. They relied on conception while we worked in the domain of perception. Without any vast backdrop of history to support our investigations, we just had to rely on our eyes.” (Irwin quoted in Weschler, Lawrence, Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing, p. 78). To further reflect upon the immediate cultural background that these artists drew upon, the exhibition will include antecedent ‘folk’ objects and materials. “As far as I’m concerned,” says Irwin, “a folk art is when you take a utilitarian object, something you use everyday, and you give it overlays of your own personality, what it is you feel and so forth. You enhance it with your life.” He continues, “a folk art in the current period of time would more appropriately be in the area of something like a motorcycle. I mean, a motorcycle can be a lot more than just a machine that runs along: it can be a whole description of a personality and an aesthetic.” (Ibid, p. 17). With this in mind, included will be objects such as a custom car designed by Ed Roth and a vintage surfboard by Hobie Alter. Also included are films by Ed Ruscha (Miracle, 1975) and Kenneth Anger (Kustom Kar Kommandos, 1965). Robert Dean is editor of the Edward Ruscha Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings and author of several other publications. For more info on Eric Minh Swenson or project inquiries visit his website: www.thuvanarts.com. You can also visit the art film series page at www.thuvanarts.com/take1

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            • ROBERT IRWIN AT QUINT CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

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              from ERIC MINH SWENSON / Added

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              Film by Eric Minh Swenson. Music by The Invertors of Aircraft. “In a world saturated with spectacle and the kind of augmented reality made possible through the digital, Irwin’s work, by contrast, raises critical questions about the fundamental nature of how and what we perceive and the value of ‘looking at and seeing all of those things that have been going on all along but previously have been too incidental or meaningless to really enter into our visual structure, our picture of the world.’” [i] Quint Contemporary Art is pleased to announce the solo exhibition of new work by seminal Light and Space artist Robert Irwin. This is Irwin’s second solo exhibition at QCA. The opening reception will take place on Saturday, February 22nd from 6 – 8PM, it is open to the public and the artist will be in attendance. “There are in aesthetic experience potentially as many “arts” as there are encounters with its incidences in the world. In confusing the art/object of “art” with the subject of art, we objectively tried to hold to the idea of one transcending art. While there is no one transcending “Art,” there is one infinite subject: The subject of art is aesthetic perception.” – Robert Irwin, from Notes Toward a Model, 1977 Robert Irwin’s philosophical essay from 1977 is still as relevant today. The Whitney Museum of Art, which originally published this essay, recreated an installation that Irwin first created in 1977, which was on view in their museum in 2013. The simple, scrim filled room brought to light the inherit qualities of the space, which changed throughout the day and engaged the viewer. The new work in the exhibition at QCA has to do with light and the way in which it can be utilized to permeate and alter a space. “Aesthetic perception” is very important to the work and the way the viewer perceives the artwork. In a review about these light+shadow+reflection+color pieces Rhama Khazam stated, “By deconstructing the process of perception, Irwin allows us (the viewer) to see how we see.” This phenomenological way of engaging the viewer makes Irwin’s artworks intriguing and perceptually challenging.

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              • DinoVentures - Parasaurolphus

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                from TILT / Added

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                TILT Creative won a Discovery Kids competitve pitch to create DinoVentures, an animation series starring Robert Irwin. We created a vibrant and engaging prehistoric world for the dinosuars to inhabit, using the digital puppet technique in AE to bring Robert and the Dinosaurs to life in their hybrid 2D and 3D world.

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                • DinoVentures - Triceratops

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                  from TILT / Added

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                  TILT Creative won a Discovery Kids competitve pitch to create DinoVentures, an animation series starring Robert Irwin. We created a vibrant and engaging prehistoric world for the dinosuars to inhabit, using the digital puppet technique in AE to bring Robert and the Dinosaurs to life in their hybrid 2D and 3D world.

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                  • DinoVentures with Robert Irwin - Spinosaurus

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                    from TILT / Added

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                    TILT Creative won a Discovery Kids competitve pitch to create DinoVentures, an animation series starring Robert Irwin. We created a vibrant and engaging prehistoric world for the dinosuars to inhabit, using the digital puppet technique in AE to bring Robert and the Dinosaurs to life in their hybrid 2D and 3D world.

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                    • DinoVentures with Robert Irwin - Ankylosaurus

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                      from TILT / Added

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                      TILT Creative won a Discovery Kids competitive pitch to create DinoVentures, an animated short-form series starring Robert Irwin, the 10-year-old-son of the late Steve Irwin, the Crocodile Hunter. TILT directed illustrator Jason Solo, at the Jacky Winter Agency, to create a colourful and engaging prehistoric world for the vibrantly coloured dinosaurs to inhabit. TILT implemented the digital puppet technique in Adobe After Effects to bring the animated Robert and dinosaurs to life, placing them in hybrid 2D and 3D worlds.

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