1. How the art of adzing led to everything else

    02:06

    from Kathy Dye / Added

    442 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Tlingit master artist Wayne Price talks about how once Northwest Coast Native people learned to adze, everything else followed, including clan houses, totem poles and dugout canoes. Sealaska Heritage Institute tapped Wayne to adze cedar panels for the Walter Soboleff building in Juneau. (Photo by Brian Wallace)

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    • Eagle and Raven Totem Poles Raised

      02:44

      from Kathy Dye / Added

      243 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Time lapse video showing two Eagle and Raven totem poles raised in Indian Village in Juneau on Sept. 29, 2014. It also shows the installation of a screen. The poles were carved to honor the Tlingit Auk Kwáan clans and long term residents of Indian Village. The Village Eagle and Raven clans along with Sealaska Heritage Institute (SHI) and the Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) sponsored the event. The totems replaced two Eagle and Raven poles at Gajaa Hit that had deteriorated to the point they posed safety issues. SHI and the Housing Authority worked closely with the Auk Kwáan and other residents of the village to identify the clan crests and oral traditions that were carved on the poles. The Auk Kwáan and village residents appointed village residents to serve as proxy carvers representing the Raven and Eagle clans. Carvers Joe and TJ Young made the poles with Master Carver Nathan Jackson and Ed Kuntz providing advice on the designs. The apprentices included Josh Yates, Jerrod Galanin and Tai'-Rel Osh Lang-Edenshaw. The team also made a new screen, which was installed on the building earlier. The original 26-foot poles were carved and painted by Tommy Jimmie, Sr., Edward Kunz, Sr., Edward Kunz, Jr., and William Smith in 1977 to honor the Raven and Eagle Clans of the Auk Kwáan. The Raven pole is a copy of a totem from Wrangell carved by William Ukas in 1896. The original screen was designed by Tommy Jimmie, Sr., and painted by Ed Kunz, Sr., and Ed Kunz, Jr. The old poles and screen are being kept in storage. This project was funded by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), Our Town program; the Rasmuson Foundation, the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council and the Juneau Community Foundation. Sealaska donated the logs, and the Tlingit Haida Regional Housing Authority paid for the apprentices and provided construction staff and equipment for the dismounting of the old screen and poles and mounting of the new screen and poles. The project was led by SHI in partnership with the housing authority, which owns Gajaa Hit. (Video by Brian Wallace)

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      • At the Glacier’s Edge: People, Seals, and History at Yakutat Bay

        01:05:38

        from Kathy Dye / Added

        98 Plays / / 0 Comments

        A lecture by anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. Aron Crowell (Smithsonian Institution) and indigenous knowledge researcher Judith Ramos (University of Alaska Fairbanks). As glaciers that once filled Yakutat Bay retreated its waters teemed with seals and fish, and Alaska Native peoples of three different cultures – Eyak, Ahtna, and Tlingit – arrived to make a new way of life together. Harbor seals that gather by the thousands in the bay’s floating glacial ice have always been the most important resource, from 1000 years ago to the present day. Now the Yakutat Tlingit Tribe, the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center, the National Science Foundation, the Sealaska Heritage Institute, Sealaska Corporation, the U.S. Forest Service, and the National Park Service are partnering on research into the unique history of the Yakutat people and their relationship to one of Alaska’s richest ecosystems. Archaeologists are uncovering dwellings, artifacts, and animal bones at sealing camps and village sites, revealing ancestral lifeways; Elders are recording place names and centuries-old oral traditions; geologists are tracking the glaciers’ movements through time; and hunters are sharing knowledge about seals and seal hunting, from past to present. Yakutat students are working with the scientists, to help rediscover the traces of their grandparents' way of life on the land. Hear how this fascinating story of collaborative research comes together in a joint presentation by anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. Aron Crowell (Smithsonian Institution) and indigenous knowledge researcher Judith Ramos (University of Alaska Fairbanks).

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        • Kooteeyaa: The Travels and Travails of a Tlingit Totem Pole From Tuxican

          58:12

          from Kathy Dye / Added

          79 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Kooteeyaa: The Travels and Travails of a Tlingit Totem Pole From Tuxican (Takjik’aan), Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska. A lecture by Dr. Stephen J. Langdon Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). In 1931, famed Hollywood actor John Barrymore traveled on a 120-foot yacht to the unoccupied Tlingit village of Tajik’aan on Prince of Wales Island. Under his direction, the crew stole a prominent pole, one of the few remaining in the village and transported it back to California. Dr. Steve J. Langdon, anthropologist from UAA, discusses the pole, its theft, its subsequent travels and trophy display in Hollywood on the estates of Barrymore and later that of fellow actor Vincent Price, followed by its incongruous transfer to the Honolulu Museum of Art in 1982. He also talks about current efforts by the Klawock Cooperative Association (IRA government of Tajik’aan descendants) to repatriate the pole.

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          • Concrete pour at the Walter Soboleff building

            00:37

            from Kathy Dye / Added

            39 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Watch a few scenes of the construction crew pouring a huge concrete slab at the Walter Soboleff building site in Juneau!

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            • Climate change and its effect on Native cultures

              01:03:08

              from Kathy Dye / Added

              36 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Lecture by Victoria Wyllie de Echeverria, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford, on how climate change is being perceived by indigenous people and how these changes are affecting cultural and biological diversity in the coastal environment of northwestern North America. She was a visiting scholar at Sealaska Heritage Institute and gave the lecture, which was based on her preliminary research.

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