1. Guerrilla Fighters of Kurdistan

    31:07

    from Joey L / Added

    267K Plays / / 207 Comments

    In March of 2015, I set off to the Kurdistan region of Iraq and Syria to begin a new personal project. In the beginning, I thought perhaps it would be a still photography trip only. But just as I left the door, I decided to grab my GoPro kit in case anything interesting happened and I could just film it myself. This is that footage. 00:00 - Intro, Joey departs NYC 01:31 - Preparation in Sulaymaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan 02:15 - PKK Guerrillas in Makhmour 05:41 - Crossing the border into Syria, YPG/J Guerrillas in Rojava 07:19 - Interview with YPJ members 09:07 - Daily life on a YPG/J base and photoshoot 10:13 - Clash in Tel Tamer, dead ISIS fighters 12:38 - Interview with American YPG Fighter “Fat Jack” in Tel Tamer 13:44 - Tel Hamis liberation, guerrillas living in abandoned ISIS base 16:38 - Urban exploration of abandoned ISIS base 20:28 - Overview of humanitarian crisis on Sinjar mountain 23:10 - ISIS suicide VBIED attack inside the besieged city of Sinjar 25:14 - Funeral of YBŞ guerrilla fighter in Sinjar 26:23 - Yezidi refugees and Shingal Resistance Unit 28:37 - Outro and closing thoughts 29:19 - Funeral of British YPG soldier Konstandinos Erik Scurfield 30:38 - Credits The photography in this video and further writing can be found at: http://www.joeyl.com/blog/all/post/guerrilla-fighters-of-kurdistan

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    • 5 minutes of Syria

      05:04

      from Ruslan Fedotow / Added

      213K Plays / / 194 Comments

      Video from journey Director of photography: Ruslan Fedotow Edit/color: Ruslan Fedotow 70-200mm IS, 50mm 1.8

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      • THE LAST PLIGHT (Short Documentary. EN)

        10:37

        from The Last Plight / Added

        128K Plays / / 45 Comments

        www.Facebook.com/TheLastPlight www.TheLastPlight.com Take a rare glimpse into the lives of the Assyrians and Yezidis after the ISIS attacks in Iraq. "The Last Plight" is a documentary about the humanitarian crisis in Iraq after the horrific terrorists attacks of the Islamic State (IS or ISIS) on Iraq's 2nd largest city Mosul and the Nineveh Plains. Their latest attacks on June 10th 2014 forced more than 600,000 Assyrian Christians, Yazidis and other Iraqi minorities to seek refuge in the Northern region of Iraq. The historical geopolitical conflict between the different players in Iraq let Iraq's minorities pay the biggest price. The film explores the causes and solutions to this mass exodus. ++++++++++++++++++++++++ It was shot in Iraq in Sept 2014 Director/Cinematographer/Editor: Sargon Saadi (www.SargonSaadi.com) Executive Producer: Sargon Rouel Associate Producer: Suzan Younan Cast: Yacoob Yaco, Mikhael Benjamin Original Music by: Stefano Maccarelli (www.StefanoMaccarelli.com) Vocal Performer: Clara Sorace (www.ClaraSorace.wordpress.com) Credit Roll Song: Nfal Farosho (The Knight Has Fallen) Singer: Izla Isa Lyrics: Shabo Bahe +++++++++++++++++++++++++ Camera: Canon C100 Lenses: Canon 16-35mm f/2.8, Canon 70-200mm IS f/2.8, Canon 50mm f/1.4

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        • Syrial Killing

          09:51

          from Johann Rousselot / Added

          125K Plays / / 12 Comments

          Revolution in Syria - 6 months later... A short reminder shot. Call of duty for me. Distress call for them. Content of these amateur videos compilation is shocking and may hurt some. However the most shocking fact is the complete impunity this barbaric and feudal regime has been granted for 6 months.

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          • Syria. The other side.

            03:52

            from Ruslan Fedotow / Added

            108K Plays / / 143 Comments

            Following the recent events that took place in Syria, people all over the world used to see this country like it presented by media. I have been twice there and can assure you Syria is a wonderful land with its age-old traditions and unique culture. First, I came to Syria together with my friends in August 2010. That's exactly when I shot my first video about the place. Later Blake Whitman showed it on vimeo.com HD channel. The movie was warmly met and watched by a great number of people, what gave me an opportunity to take part in another project in Syria in February this year. It was a documentary about the country made in 20 days. I was DOP in a second unit. The video you see I made together with my friend from my Syrian shot here, at home. I wish people remembered Syria a great and marvelous country like it really is! Thank you! Director of photography: Ruslan Fedotow Edit/color: Artem Yakimov Canon 5D mark2, 16-35mm 2,8L II, 24-70mm 2,8L, 70-200mm 2,8 IS L II, Glidetrack. Editing and color in Sony Vegas 10. Special thanks: vimeo.com, Blake Whitman, artwarecorp.com, dslrvideo.ru, Marta Khvastova, Dasha Kovaleva, Andrew Mikhnuik.

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            • Documenters الموثقون

              04:49

              from faisal attrache / Added

              83.8K Plays / / 0 Comments

              Those at the front lines are the first witnesses to history and the vanguards of the “truth”— but is it enough just to see? Syrian civilian journalists risk their lives to tell their stories to the world. Cast: Jay Abdo, Ned Yousef, Ryan P. Shrime, Saher Alkhattib Written and Directed by Faisal Attrache Music: "#SYRIA" by Omar Offendum, produced by Sami Matar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXjEWrhkb6g Official Selection Palm Springs International Shortfest Official Selection San Francisco IndieFest Official Selection Chicago International Social Change Film Festival Special Program - International Short Film Week Regensburg, Germany "An Evening of Social Change Films" USC School of Cinematic Arts Reporters Without Borders - Country profile on Syria - http://en.rsf.org/syria.html Amnesty International - Country profile on Syria - https://www.amnesty.org/en/countries/middle-east-and-north-africa/syria/

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              • MOST SHOCKING SECOND A DAY / SAVE THE CHILDREN

                01:34

                from Burning Flag / Added

                35.7K Plays / / 6 Comments

                A young girl's life gets turned upside-down in this tragic second a day video. Could this ever happen in the UK? This is what war does to children. Brand / Save The Children / http://bit.ly/3yearson Agency / Don't Panic London / http://www.dontpaniclondon.com Production Company / UNIT9 Films / http://www.unit9.com Director / Martin Stirling / http://www.martinstirling.com/Martin_Stirling/Home.html Editor / Alex Burt Producer / Elliott Tagg & Geoff Morgan DOP / Jacob Proud (Burning Flag) / http://www.burning-flag.com Post Production / Smoke & Mirrors

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                • Fareed Zakaria: Stay Out Of Syria

                  04:46

                  from The Dish / Added

                  33.8K Plays / / 3 Comments

                  Fareed shares his thoughts on whether or not the US should get more involved in Syria. "Fareed Zakaria GPS" airs Sundays on CNN and via podcast (bit.ly/fzGPSpodcast). Zakaria is also an Editor-at-Large of TIME Magazine, a Washington Post columnist, and the author of "The Post-American World" (amzn.to/ZqZwU6), "The Future of Freedom" (amzn.to/ZLdDWJ), and "From Wealth to Power: The Unusual Origins of America's World Role" (amzn.to/17X0JZ6). This video was recorded as part of the Dish's Ask Anything interview series. It was recorded on June 3, 2013 in New York, NY.

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                  • What Are We Doing in Syria?

                    56:46

                    from BillMoyers.com / Added

                    28.1K Plays / / 4 Comments

                    With the probability of American intervention, Syria is everywhere in the news. On this week’s Moyers & Company, Phil Donahue, filling in for Bill Moyers, speaks with National Public Radio Middle East correspondent Deborah Amos and historian and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich about the possible repercussions of our actions in the Middle East. As he has done so often in recent years, Andrew Bacevich is asking the important questions about America’s role in the world and specifically why we should go into Syria. Is a military response justified and if we take action, where does it stop? A graduate of West Point and Vietnam veteran, he served for 23 years in the military before becoming a professor at Boston University.  His new book, Breach of Trust, asks whether our reliance on a professional military rather than a citizen's army has lured us into a morass of endless war -- a trap that threatens not only our global reputation but democracy itself. Among its deadly side effects, the war in Syria has created a refugee crisis beyond that country’s borders -- a “disgraceful humanitarian calamity” and “the great tragedy of this century,” according to the United Nations. Deborah Amos, a veteran National Public Radio correspondent, joins Donahue for a discussion about the human toll of the Syrian fighting, and the potential impact of millions of displaced people on the region.

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                    • A Rare View From Inside ISIS Controlled Kobani

                      04:33

                      from Vocativ / Added

                      27.4K Plays / / 2 Comments

                      On October 31, 2014, we crossed into Kobani, Syria. An estimated 8,000 ISIS fighters pushed into the city in late September, causing upwards of 200,000 civilians to flee to neighboring Turkey. We were some of the first journalists in as hundreds of Free Syrian Army and Iraqi Peshmerga soldiers joined the YPG (the national army of Syrian Kurdistan) in the battle against ISIS. When we entered, we were told by the FSA that ISIS controlled as much as 70% of the city, and the opposition wasn’t making much progress on any of the frontlines. We personally witnessed airstrikes carried out by the US and Allied forces against known ISIS strongholds. “Are the airstrikes effective?” I asked Colonel Abduljabbar Akaidi, who is leading the FSA on the ground. “Not at all,” he told me. “The help came too late. They needed to cut off the ISIS convoys from Raqqah.” We spent five days in the embattled city, going to the frontlines and talking to fighters, all of whom said that they needed more help from the West in the form of heavy weaponry. A YPG soldier took us to an ISIS base that had been leveled by an airstrike and pointed out the corpses of ISIS fighters rotting among the rubble. "This man is Chinese," he said, motioning to a bloated body sprawled next to a pink rug. “ISIS doesn't collect their dead,” he told us. We went to a poorly equipped local field hospital that had been set up in an abandoned home. The doctor there, Mohamed Aref, told us about the grave injuries he sees on a daily basis. Injured civilians and fighters routinely die as he waits for permission for them to cross the border to get adequate medical treatment in Turkish hospitals. We met some of the thousands of civilians left in town and got their horrifying accounts of the day ISIS came to town. We heard about beheadings, kidnappings, and rapes--the unadulterated brutality that has become ISIS’ hallmark. We got used to the din of war—the Dushka (heavy machine gun) fire, the shelling, and the hum of generators in a city with no other source of electricity. Our most harrowing moment came when we tried to leave Kobani to cross back into Turkey. We were waiting at the border for word that it was safe for us to move when we heard Dushka fire nearby. Then, a mortar hit the building directly across from us. “Shit!” I heard myself saying. Several more hit, and they were getting closer. A dead pigeon fell from the sky next to us, and I saw a faint trace of concern in Colonel Akaidi’s eyes. Some YPG fighters ran across the street to us and ushered us to shelter under a house as ISIS continued to hammer us with shells. Our fixer, Ibrahim Ali, gave me a weak smile. “At least the Assad regime isn’t here,” he said. “We’d be fucked if there were planes dropping barrel bombs!” We laughed. We had to. Worst case, we figured, the barrage of shells could collapse the walls of the house and trap us for a while. The Colonel made phone calls and paced as we chain-smoked cigarettes and waited. Finally, the shelling stopped, and we ran across the border into a sea of Turkish military. Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=vocativvideo See more on our website: http://www.vocativ.com Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vocativ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Vocativ

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