1. Star Party

    00:28

    from Jeremy / Added

    289 Plays / / 2 Comments

    A night of astrophotography with a friend out under the remote skies of Concan, Texas (2 hours west of San Antonio) captured in timelapse. My setup on the right, his on the left. We headed out from San Antonio under cloudy skies, passed through a few rain showers on the way, but were treated to a clear sky with an amazing view of the night sky. We imaged until about 5am when an approaching thunderstorm sent us packing. Three separate scenes totaling about 600 images with a canon 5D3 and 16-35mm f/2.8: setting sun to night during scope setup, several hours of astro imaging, and finally take down with a storm approaching. It captured the night well and is likely better than the astro shots I'll produce! Music by Paulin Garner State Park in Concan, Texas

    + More details
    • Swarovski Optik

      05:36

      from SWAROVSKI OPTIK / Added

      135 Plays / / 0 Comments

      + More details
      • Guerrilla Astronomy at the South Perth Foreshore

        01:42

        from ICRAR / Added

        254 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Outreach where they least expect it – Guerrilla Astronomers I have a confession – I love astronomy. Something about it has fascinated me ever since I can remember. As part of my role in the Outreach and Education team at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) I take a lot of telescopes to a lot of places and people are always interested to look through them, at them, or just talk about them. One of my favourite outreach strategies is the idea of ‘Guerrilla Astronomy’ – taking a telescope somewhere people will least expect it and introducing them to astronomy with no advertising or attempt to gather an audience. Myself and a band of ICRAR’s professional astronomers take a small (but still impressive looking) telescope or two out to the side of a bike path, to the middle of the CBD shopping precinct, or to another outdoor event and simply stand next to our telescopes talking to anyone that comes near. People always come near, and the result is something that never ceases to remind me why I do what I do. From the woman on her evening jog who got straight back in the car after seeing the Moon to go get her kids; to the children who wont let anyone else have a turn because they are so mesmerised by the Orion Nebula; through to a member of the public helping his elderly mother take her first close up look at Jupiter and its moons, and her gasp when the image became clear to her through the eyepiece. Talking with the astronomers who join me on these evenings, we have so many more positive engagement stories like these. To me, this kind of work is the most important and most interesting part of science communication – engaging with the unengaged and giving them a positive experience of science to take away. There’s probably a large combination of things that make these events so successful – the unexpected experience, and therefore no expectations of what will happen, us being conveniently located where people are already, and in the evening when there’s sometimes a bit more time to spare. But I like to think that the telescopes themselves play a big part in it – they’re an ingeniously simple piece of machinery (just a couple of mirrors and a lens when you get down to it) that pack a big punch and make the previously invisible, visible. Nothing beats seeing the red spot on Jupiter in person ‘for real’ and knowing that the light has travelled from the depths of the Sun where it was created in a nuclear reaction, all the way out to Jupiter (741 million kilometres) and then bounced off right back into this telescope and then your eye. Or maybe that’s just me? Kirsten Gottschalk Outreach and Education Officer ICRAR: Discovering the hidden Universe through radio astronomy

        + More details
        • Telescope Rocket at the University of Miami

          05:07

          from Maurice Coombs / Added

          Dr. Massimiliano Galeazzi, associate professor of Physics and head of the X-ray Astrophysics Group, and his team are building a rocket in collaboration with NASA. It is designed to study the X-rays emitted when the solar wind interacts with the Milky Way gas entering the solar system. The rocket will be about 50 feet long and will reach an altitude of about160 miles. During its five minute flight, it will be able to record data that is impossible to obtain with current X-ray satellites. The rocket is scheduled to launch in December, from a military base in New Mexico. In addition to Dr. Galeazzi, the UM team is made up of three graduate students, two undergraduate student and a high school student intern from Coral Reef Senior High School.

          + More details
          • Beginner Astronomy Class- Sept 2012

            01:07:33

            from Texas Astronomical Society / Added

            90 Plays / / 0 Comments

            TelescopeMan records Bradford Leonard of the Texas Astronomical Society at the September 2012 Beginner Class at Richland College. Bradford discusses the types of telescopes during this class. Join us at Richland College, Dallas, Texas on the 1st Friday evening of every month for our Beginner Astronomy Class. Details are on the TAS Calendar link at the top of our web site at www.texasastro.org

            + More details
            • Highway 33

              09:50

              from Jay Skuban / Added

              94 Plays / / 0 Comments

              A collection of TL, HDR images and video taken over the year in Wisconsin and Illinois. I've been a long time photography and astronomy enthusiast and this love is taking me into the relm of time lapse.

              + More details
              • ESOcast 47: Finding Life — Special 50th anniversary episode #7

                08:51

                from ESO Observatory / Added

                80 Plays / / 2 Comments

                ESOcast 47 is the seventh special episode of this series. In this special episode we look at one of the greatest quests that astronomers have pursued over the centuries: the search for life in the Universe. ESO has played an important role in this exciting journey. Watch this episode to discover more about ESO’s role in the quest for life in the Universe. More information about this episode: http://www.eso.org/public/announcements/ann12057/ Download various file-types and see all translated subtitles of this episode: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/esocast47a/ More episodes of the ESOcast are also available: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/archive/category/esocast/ Credit: An ESO production Directed by: Lars Lindberg Christensen Art Direction, Production Design: Martin Kornmesser Producer: Herbert Zodet Written by: Govert Schilling 3D animations and graphics: Martin Kornmesser & Luis Calçada Editing: Martin Kornmesser Cinematography: Herbert Zodet & Peter Rixner Sound engineer: Cristian Larrea Audio Mastering: Peter Rixner Host & Lead Scientist: Dr J (Dr Joe Liske, ESO) Narration: Sara Mendes da Costa Soundtrack & Sound Effects: movetwo — Axel Kornmesser & Markus Löffler & zero-project (zero-project.gr) Proof reading: Anne Rhodes Technical support: Lars Holm Nielsen, Raquel Yumi Shida & Mathias Andre DVD Authoring: Andre Roquette Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen Footage and photos: ESO Christoph Malin (christophmalin.com) Babak Tafreshi/TWAN Stéphane Guisard (eso.org/~sguisard) José Francisco Salgado (josefrancisco.org) Alexandre Santerne Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org) Martin Kornmesser Herbert Zodet J. Dommaget/J. Boulon/J. Doornenbal/W. Schlosser/F.K. Edmondson/A. Blaauw/Rademakers/R. Holder Mineworks Daniel Crouch/Rare Books (crouchrarebooks.com) Getty Images Royal Astronomical Society/Science Photo Library Jay M. Pasachoff Chris de Coning/South African Library/Warner-Madear Africana Museum/Warner Leiden University G. Brammer Mauricio Anton/Science Library NASA/Spitzer Science Center/R. Hurt VISTA/J. Emerson Digitized Sky Survey 2 MPE/S. Gillessen/M. Schartmann PIONIER/IPAG Rainer Lenzen/MPIA Heidelberg West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in Berlin by KolBerlin Davide De Martin Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit IDA/Danish 1.5 m/R. Gendler and C. Thöne Mario Nonino, Piero Rosati and the ESO GOODS Team ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO) The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope Matthias Maercker Igor Chekalin Hans-Hermann Heyer Edmund Janssen Luis Calçada Scott Kardel Tom Jarrett, Kevin Govender Sergey Stepanenko ESA NASA IAU/IYA2009 T. Preibisch R. Fosbury (ST-ECF) INAF-VST/OmegaCAM OmegaCen/Astro-WISE/Kapteyn Institute A. Fujii J.-B. Le Bouquin et al. D. Coe (STScI)/J. Merten (Heidelberg/Bologna) Gemini Observatory/NRC/AURA/Christian Marois et al. M. Janson Jean-Luc Beuzit IAC (SMM) and ESPRESSO consortium T.M. Brown (STScI) UltraVISTA team, TERAPIX/CNRS/INSU/CASU World Wide Telescope

                + More details
                • ALMA Timelapse

                  04:51

                  from Jim Geach / Added

                  46 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  I took webcam images from inside the ALMA array (which are taken and updated at regular intervals - I curled them off the website using a cronjob) and strung them together to make this timelapse video of operations at the telescope. I did a bit of editing to chop out jumpy sections, plus "Under the Milky Way Tonight" by The Church seemed like a good backing track (and fitted the time nicely).

                  + More details
                  • The Cutting Edge In 1888

                    01:37

                    from University of California / Added

                    511 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Steve Vogt, Professor, Astronomy and Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz, shares his start in astronomy and gives a tour of the historic Lick Observatory. More with Steve Vogt: An Incredibly Hostile Universe / https://vimeo.com/48040934 How To Discover Habitable Planets / https://vimeo.com/48110346 www.onwardcalifornia.com/#stories

                    + More details
                    • ESOcast 46: Catching Light -- Special 50th anniversary episode #6

                      10:56

                      from ESO Observatory / Added

                      500 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      ESOcast 46 is the sixth special episode of this series. It describes how state-of-the-art cameras and spectrographs help ESO’s powerful telescopes collect and analyse the faint light from the distant Universe. Without these instruments, ESO’s eyes on the sky would be blind. Today’s astronomical images are very different from those from the 1960s. Back then, astronomers used large photographic glass plates, which were not very sensitive and hard to handle. Nowadays, ESO’s telescopes use some of the largest and most sensitive electronic detectors in the world. They catch almost every cosmic photon and recover almost every possible bit of information. For instance, the VLT Survey Telescope’s camera — OmegaCAM — has 32 detectors, which team up to produce spectacular images of the Universe, each with an impressive 268 million pixels. But astronomy is not only about taking breathtaking images. Astronomers are always after as much information as possible so they need to dissect the starlight into its component colours to study its composition. Spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools in astronomy and ESO’s telescopes also have some of the world’s most powerful spectrographs, such as the powerful X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope. Spectroscopy allows astronomers to infer important properties of the stars, such as the chemical elements they contain, their temperatures, motions, and even their ages. Moreover, they can study the atmospheres of exoplanets orbiting distant stars or newborn galaxies at the edge of observable Universe. Watch this episode to discover more about ESO’s state-of-the-art astronomical instruments. More information and download-options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/esocast46a/ Credit: An ESO production Directed by: Lars Lindberg Christensen Art Direction, Production Design: Martin Kornmesser Producer: Herbert Zodet Written by: Govert Schilling 3D animations and graphics: Martin Kornmesser & Luis Calçada Editing: Martin Kornmesser Cinematography: Herbert Zodet & Peter Rixner Sound engineer: Cristian Larrea Audio Mastering: Peter Rixner Host & Lead Scientist: Dr J (Dr Joe Liske, ESO) Narration: Sara Mendes da Costa Soundtrack & Sound Effects: movetwo — Axel Kornmesser & Markus Löffler & zero-project (zero-project.gr) Proof reading: Anne Rhodes Technical support: Lars Holm Nielsen, Raquel Yumi Shida & Mathias Andre DVD Authoring: Andre Roquette Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen Footage and photos: ESO Christoph Malin (christophmalin.com) Babak Tafreshi/TWAN Stéphane Guisard (eso.org/~sguisard) José Francisco Salgado (josefrancisco.org) Alexandre Santerne Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org) Martin Kornmesser Herbert Zodet J. Dommaget/J. Boulon/J. Doornenbal/W. Schlosser/F.K. Edmondson/A. Blaauw/Rademakers/R. Holder Mineworks Daniel Crouch/Rare Books (crouchrarebooks.com) Getty Images Royal Astronomical Society/Science Photo Library Jay M. Pasachoff Chris de Coning/South African Library/Warner-Madear Africana Museum/Warner Leiden University G. Brammer Mauricio Anton/Science Library NASA/Spitzer Science Center/R. Hurt VISTA/J. Emerson Digitized Sky Survey 2 MPE/S. Gillessen/M. Schartmann PIONIER/IPAG Rainer Lenzen/MPIA Heidelberg West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in Berlin by KolBerlin Davide De Martin Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit IDA/Danish 1.5 m/R. Gendler and C. Thöne Mario Nonino, Piero Rosati and the ESO GOODS Team ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO) The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope Matthias Maercker Igor Chekalin Hans-Hermann Heyer Edmund Janssen Luis Calçada Scott Kardel Tom Jarrett, Kevin Govender Sergey Stepanenko ESA NASA IAU/IYA2009 T. Preibisch R. Fosbury (ST-ECF) INAF-VST/OmegaCAM OmegaCen/Astro-WISE/Kapteyn Institute A. Fujii J.-B. Le Bouquin et al. D. Coe (STScI)/J. Merten (Heidelberg/Bologna) Gemini Observatory/NRC/AURA/Christian Marois et al. M. Janson Jean-Luc Beuzit IAC (SMM) and ESPRESSO consortium T.M. Brown (STScI) UltraVISTA team, TERAPIX/CNRS/INSU/CASU World Wide Telescope

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."