1. Million Gallons 2:13

    02:13

    from anders tomlinson / Added

    This is another scene with Jimi Yamaichi at the Tule Lake Internment - Segregation site during the 2004 Tule Lake Pilgrimage, July, 3, 2004. Jimi is showing folks one of the main ditches that moved water from west to east and north and south off of laterals. The ditch was unlined and water was lost to evaporation and soaking into the dry lake bed. He states that the camp was pumping as much as a million dollars a day and water pressure was an issue to deal with. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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    • Painted Seagulls 1:29

      01:29

      from anders tomlinson / Added

      This is an interview with Jimi Yamaichi by Cindy Wright in March 2004. Cindy, at the time, was general manager of the Tulelake - Butte Valley Fairgrounds and Museum. jimi shares the fact that some women spent much of their day looking for seashells in the dry lake bottom of reclaimed Tule Lake. And there were men who would sit and pass the time of day in the holes the women dug. They would catch sea gulls and paint them. Game wardens in Eureka were wondering where these sea gulls with colorful markings on their body were coming from? This interview was the first time Anders Tomlinson met Jimi Yamaichi. The next day they would go to the camp and film the March 2004 tour of the camp. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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      • Game Warden 2:04

        02:04

        from anders tomlinson / Added

        This is the first of 17 scenes to be completed documenting Jimi Yamaichi at the Tule Lake Internment - Segregation site during the 2004 Tule Lake Pilgrimage, July, 3, 2004. He has a wireless mic on him to record his recollections and interaction with the Pilgrimage. In this segment Jimi talks about the day the Game Warden hung a duck around the neck of one of the internees who had been outside of camp catching birds. Men would sneak outside camp along with a couple of men whose job was to check the Emhoff tanks. All waterfowl and bird video was filmed on the Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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        • Coal Piles 2:00

          02:00

          from anders tomlinson / Added

          Jimi Yamaichi shows us the remains of a coal pile that fed a laundry room's boiler. He also points out laundry room remnants. Each block had a coal pile that served 17 to 18 barracks. The mess halls fired their boilers up at 4am. Breakfast was served between 6 and 8am. Lunch was served between 11:30am and 1:30pm. Dinner was served between 6 and 7:30pm. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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          • Disinfectants 2:13

            02:13

            from anders tomlinson / Added

            Jimi Yamaichi is standing in what was a feet disinfector pan. One would step in the pan coming and going from the concrete shower floors. Athletic foot was a camp problem. Internees made clogs out of 2 x 4's so their feet would never touch the ground. Jimi mentions that the internees had coal heating and the army has oil heat. He walks from the mens' shower room to the woman's side of the shared latrine building. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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            • 25 Cents Had Value 1:38

              01:38

              from anders tomlinson / Added

              Living in Tule Lake Internment - Segregation Center meant you had a roof over your head and three meals a day in the mess halls. Everything else, all personal needs, one had to bought including toilet paper. Jimi Yamaichi shares the fact that Tule Lake had the lowest employment rate of all the camps at 37%. Some of the other camps had employment rates as high as 55%. If one was being paid 16 dollars a month it meant they were being paid 7 cents an hour. Toilet paper might cost nearly an hour's pay. 25 cents was worth something for many internees at the Tule Lake Internment - Segregation Center. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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              • Last Camp to Close 2:28

                02:28

                from anders tomlinson / Added

                The last ten blocks of barracks mainly housed Internees from Manzanar Internment Center and men from a Justice Camp in Hawaii. Family members in the USA would reunite with the men from Hawaii at the Tule Lake Segregation Center. Jimi Yamaichi recalls that Tule Lake was thought to be the most self-sustaining of all the camps. It had 3,800 acres of cultivated rich farmland, chicken and hog farms, large packing house to process food, pumps, wells and sewers systems. All of the camps had closed in the Fall of 1945 while Tule Lake remained open until March 20th, 1946. Tule Lake Internment - Segregation Center was torn down in 1947 and 1948. There had been talk of using the camp to house 15,000 Communist party members. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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                • Manzanar Area 1:55

                  01:56

                  from anders tomlinson / Added

                  Jimi Yamiachi takes us to the site of the Manzanar area where ten blocks of barracks were built on the southeast corner of the Tule Lake Internment - Segregation Center. It mainly housed men from Manzanar Internment Center between Lone Pine and Independence, California. Jimi visually points out the size of the camp and two Emhoff sewage tanks built at either end of the camp. He shows up concrete piers of a 120 foot long Manzanar barracks as well as where the latrines were. The Manzanar area had seperate latrines for men and women while half of the camp at single latrines for both men and women. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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                  • Food Shipments 0:54

                    00:54

                    from anders tomlinson / Added

                    Jimi Yamaichi was part of the crew that closed the camp after all the internees had left. He found found shipping papers that listed, as example, five railroad cars were headed with grade A - number 1 produce for Manzanar and five had no destination for "security reasons". Where did the food go?

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                    • Baby Food 0:45

                      00:45

                      from anders tomlinson / Added

                      Tule Lake Internment - Segregation Center was one of the camps that did not offer baby food. Jimi Yamaichi recounts the economic hardships poorer internee families' endured. Filmed and edited by Anders Tomlinson. Produced by Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi. ©2013 Anders Tomlinson and Jimi Yamaichi, all rights reserved.

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