1. Xu Bing on PBS Art Loft

    05:41

    from News Travels Fast Added 30 0 0

    Watch Chinese artist Xu Bing on PBS Art Loft, interviewed about his exhibition "Writing Between Heaven and Earth" at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum FIU - along with the museum's director Jordana Pomeroy and FIU Professor Lidu Yi (Curator of the exhibition).

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    • Glaze

      01:00

      from Harvest Mountain Added 128 2 0

      Extreme close up photography of ceramic glazes. All photography and ceramics by Adam Bernard aka Harvest Mountain.

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      • "Three Friends of Winter"

        05:33

        from PBP Added

        An Asian Art Educational Video by PBP MOVIE INTRODUCTION The "Three Friends of Winter" are the pine, bamboo and plum. Every year, as the cold days darken into winter, many plants wither and die, but the pine, bamboo and plum do not. In Far Eastern Cultures they are reminders to hold true to noble virtues, to be steadfast and resilient, providing the reassurance that one can persevere, even through the most difficult times. This is a retelling of the story, "Three Friends of Winter" from a very old Chinese document known as "The Record of the Five-cloud Plum Cottage" (五雲梅舍記), an accounting included in "The Clear Mountain Collection" (霽山集) by Lin Jingxi (林景熙) (1242-1310), a Chinese writer of the late Song/early Yuan dynasties. (宋朝)/(元朝). © Copyright by threefriendsofwinter.org

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        • Dashi Namdakov, Between Heaven & Earth

          03:32

          from Halcyon Gallery Added 894 1 0

          Between Heaven & Earth comprises over 25 new sculptures, the culmination of three years’ work. The exhibition focuses on Dashi’s bronze sculptures of animals, both real and mythical which are incredibly opulent and magnificent in scale: a monumental bronze patinated dragon entitled Golden Dragon measures three and a half metres from tip to tail. Seven new unique sculptures include four oynx and bronze sculptures; two lapis lazuli pieces and one marble sculpture: Amazon. Other key unique pieces are King of The Beast which is decorated with 24 carat gold leaf; Grace which incorporates over a ton of onyx and Tiger and Bird, a lapis lazuli and bronze sculpture adorned with an ornate murano glass and gold leaf mosaic. Halcyon Gallery 144-146 New Bond Street London W1S 2PF T. +44(0)20 7100 7144 E. info@halcyongallery.com

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          • Artist Presentation

            03:00

            from E-Moderne Gallerie Added 29 0 0

            Klaus-Peter Vellguth is a German Abstract artist from Berlin. This video is a presentation of his debut exhibition "The Berlin Abstraction": The feast of Oktober in contemporaries at the E-Modern Gallerie, Philadelphia.

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            • A Journey Through Asian Art E06

              10:00

              from Snodger Media Added 1 0 0

              The mid twentieth century, art became a tool in the drive for independence from the West. Alison Carroll talks about Hendra Gunawan’s Hello Hello Bandung, which was painted as the Japanese left and the Dutch tried to resume their colonial control of Indonesia. Gunawan uses the angular form of the wayang puppets when depicting the soldiers. Vietnamese artists were also looking to traditional techniques and merging them with modern ideas. To Ngoc Van’s Lighting a torch to go to night class, was painted just before he died in the battle of Dien Bien Phu against the French. In the Philippines, Alison Carroll talks with Brenda Fajardo about how she combined depictions of people throughout the independence struggles with mystic symbols of the tarot cards to make a political statement. Interviews in this episode: Brenda Fajardo – Philippines

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              • A Journey Through Asian Art E07

                10:00

                from Snodger Media Added 1 0 0

                Communist Chinese art was heavily influenced by Russian painting. The Chinese adopted the European idea of history painting, a painting that seemingly depicts an historical event, but in fact is designed to display the power of the regime. Alison Carroll investigates the Dong Xiwen painting, Mao declaring the Communist People’s Republic from Tiananmen Square, a history painting of in which key characters were painted in and out depending upon whether they were in favour. Alison Carroll talks to Shen Jiawei a key artist working for the Cultural Revolution. He tells the story of a painting he created and how it too was painted over to better suit the communist agenda. Interviews in this episode: Shen Jiawei – China/Australia

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                • A Journey Through Asian Art E08

                  10:00

                  from Snodger Media Added 0 0 0

                  In Japanese culture the space between objects is as important as the objects themselves. Tan Boon Hui explains that, for East Asian artists, space is not left over, it is created. Alison visits the house of Lee U-fan, leader of the Mono-ha movement in the 1960s in Japan. Lee U-fan talks about he aims of the Mono-ha artists. They used raw materials and tried to ‘not make’ the art, by allowing the materials to express themselves. He shows Alison some of his sculptural works in his garden. Interviews in this episode: Lee U-fan – Japan Tan Boon Hui - Singapore

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                  • A Journey Through Asian Art E09

                    10:00

                    from Snodger Media Added 0 0 0

                    The destruction, and military failure in WWII created space for young Japanese artists to critic the status quo. We visit the vaults of a museum in Tokyo where a key work in the new style hangs. Instead of just painting the canvas, artists began to explore ways of incorporating their gesture and movement into the work. The gesture became more important than the artwork itself. It became the artwork, leading to a rise of performance art. Examples include Ono’s Cut Piece and Tanaka’s Electric Dress. The boundaries between visual arts and performance blurred, culminating in the work of Hijikata and his creation of Butoh. Alison Carroll talks with Yumi Umiumare, a Butoh practitioner about the ideas behind this form of dance. Interviews in this episode: Yumi Umiumare – Japan/Australia

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                    • A Journey Through Asian Art E05

                      10:00

                      from Snodger Media Added 3 0 0

                      In 1930s Shanghai the writer Lu Xun asked artists to create woodblock prints that showed the hardship of life. Woodblocks had been developed in China centuries before, but it was the more recent work of Kathe Kollwitz that inspired the return to the form. After the revolution Mao could see the value of this form of art as propaganda. Alison Carroll explains that the mass produced prints even helped to make Chinese people literate. After the Cultural Revolution the prints become bigger and simplified. The strong graphic political style which developed was influential around the world, particularly in the 1970s, and Carroll visits Australian printmaker Ann Newmarch to discuss how this Chinese art practice spread into Australasia and influenced Newmarch’s work. By the end of the twentieth century the graphic style of the prints had evolved into ironic canvas works that critiqued the regime, but were no longer created for mass consumption. Interviews in this episode: Ann Newmarch – Australia

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