1. finbar story

    07:32

    from Steeven PETITTEVILLE / Added

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    • BEACH

      03:29

      from Steeven PETITTEVILLE / Added

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      • Rain Nightclub Belfast 2012

        01:38

        from Youcef. / Added

        1,234 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Winner of GO BELFAST Club of the year 2009 & FATE Best Club 2010 For guest list, party bookings and VIP contact: zoe@rainnightclub.co.uk 07564572686 BBM PIN: 21381E3 Welcome to Rain Rain Nightclub is a state of the art space in Belfasts city centres chic Cathedral Quarter. Truly unparalleled in the world of premium nightclubs, the venue oozes opulence and devotes a superior level of service to those who demand only the best. Rain has taken the Belfast club scene by storm by going back to basics with stunning decor, extensive drinks list & world-renowned Funktion One sound system. Winner of GO BELFAST Club of the Year 2009 & FATE Best Club 2010 BBM PIN: 2585e7b4

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        • Our Generation: In Conversation with Roisin McGlone

          01:05:59

          from Northern Visions NvTv / Added

          “The Troubles began at the time we moved up to Andersonstown from the Falls Road. My lasting memory is the raids, whenever the army and police came. This would be before Ulsterisation. They closed off streets and searched all the houses. As a young girl, I remember, English soldiers in my bedroom going through clothes. It was very embarrassing more than anything else. It was a very abnormal place to grow up. Although we lived through those times in what appeared to be quite a sane and rational way, I think it left us quite traumatised in terms of our generation.” Today, Roisin has children of her own and she reflects upon her mother’s life. “I look at my own children and I think what it must have been like for our parents. It must have been absolutely awful. Looking back it was almost like a paralysis in our communities. I became a parent in my late twenties and I remember thinking when the first ceasefire happened… ‘please God don’t let us go back to that.’ I could cope with it while it was happening, but once it was not happening, you didn’t want to go back to it. That was when a great fear came.” In the beginning, Roisin’s community work centred around youth issues and rights. “ I worked in Ardmonagh Gardens (Turf Lodge), and I really loved it up there. Young people would be referred by the Save The Children Fund, some of the cases would be heartbreaking. As I grew older a realisation came upon me that young people, really didn’t have that much of a chance”. Roisin found challenges when she went to work with the Belfast Education and Library Board in the Lower Falls, engaging with disaffected young people who were drug abusers, joy riders and those with general anti social behavioural issues. “It was at that stage, working with young people from the Lower Falls area, I started to get a real sense that these young people were very hungry to meet people from the other community. It was then that I started to dabble around inter-community work. It occurred to me that there was certainly more to this conflict than two groups of people not being nice to one another.” Roisin explains her reasons for becoming a community worker, “It was about equality, justice and empowerment. It was about helping people impact on the decisions that affect their lives… to say to people ‘stand up, stand up and say.” Mistrust existed in both communities in Northern Ireland. “A lot of the violence was on the back of stories that weren’t true or misinterpretations of people’s actions. We decided to have a community enquiry with a panel from Counteract, Queens University and the Community Relations Council. We asked them to go out to the different areas and to hold hearings where the ordinary public or groups could come and talk. We edited these reports into a book, On The Edge. Fortunately we were able to do another publication, which, looked back at what the community had achieved once we had identified what the problems were.” From these studies, the groundbreaking mobile phone networks in interface areas, which still exist today, were established. These networks help to create a peaceful environment at segregated interface areas through intervention, prevention, engagement and dialogue. “We had a lot of trouble getting that first Mobile Phone Network, no one would listen to us and every Government agency didn’t trust us. Eventually we lobbied all the political parties, (there was no Assembly in those days), to put pressure on the civil service. They agreed to give us 13 phones for four weeks. That was many years ago. Now we have mobile phone networks 24 hours a day, all year.” Roisin vividly recalls the moment when she felt that all the hard work and effort was beginning to pay off. “We had a meeting with the phone holders. The phone holders grew. More and more friendships developed. One woman arrived late to one of the meetings and she said … listen I’ve just heard on the news that there was trouble at Lanark Way and no one phoned me. What’s the problem?’ One guy from the unionist community said… ‘that is our side, there was a party and they went down and they were kicking the gates.’ A guy from the nationalist community said… ‘hold on, that was our side that did that last night. The army were parked up at the gate and they came up and started to stone them.’ And I thought ‘we’ve done it, we are not blaming each other, we’re taking responsibility’. That’s when I knew that we were going to be able to work this.” Roisin believes the biggest challenge in today’s society is sectarianism. “We have a fundamental, underlying issue around sectarianism and I think we’ve taken our eye off the ball. At a Government level people got very complacent. You have to work hard to change hearts and minds".

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          • Our Generation: In Conversation with Jackie Redpath

            52:05

            from Northern Visions NvTv / Added

            Jackie Redpath grew up in the Woodvale area of the upper Shankill Road, a child of Evangelical Christian parents, his early life was dominated by the Shankill Baptist Church. “It was a very strict evangelical, fundamentalist upbringing, very clear lines between right and wrong, black and white. You were separated from your friends in the street by difference, because your whole week was dominated by church based activities when you weren’t at school” In his teens, Jackie was preaching in his local Baptist church, “It’s a bit ridiculous really, a 15 year old, I was a boy preacher, because I was just brought up to believe that”. When rioting on the Shankill Road broke in the late 1960s, Jackie began to look at different ways of bettering peoples lives. “It was an uprising on the streets, it was riots, it was nightly, it was turmoil and that sort of stuff invaded the church, except that the church attempted to avoid it, and this opened my eyes. Sunday night at the Shankill Baptist was the Gospel meeting, this was the bit where you were meant to have the great unsaved to get them saved, they were all outside rioting and you were inside, quite safe. The church’s reaction was to move their Gospel meeting from 7pm to 4pm before the riots started so that they could drive in and get their cars out before the riots. I thought, something’s wrong here, instead of being out talking to these people and getting them in from all this mayhem, here are people getting out of the way before it actually happens. That really changed the situation for me, A few of us said look, we need to be doing something about this if we believe in what we believe in. We opened a two up two down derelict terraced house, fixed it up, moved in and called it The Way, which was like an outreach thing for all the kids who were out causing all sorts of trouble. That was, I suppose, a key thing for me in breaking away from the established church.” In the early 1970s Jackie studied History at Queens University. He was also trying to understand the redevelopment that was happening around him. “People talk of the Troubles over the last forty years, and, I remember during it saying a bigger trouble for the people on the Shankill, was redevelopment. That’s what turned their lives upside down. The redevelopment impacted not only on people’s lives and families but on the whole community, because the process was inhumane, it took apart a community and never put it together again” In 1973, Jackie was married and living in the Hammer area of the Shankill, working for the Shankill Community Council. He became involved in the ‘Save The Shankill’ campaign, fighting the planners as well as the N.I. Housing Executive in an effort to save the Shankill community’s way of life. “Save The Shankill campaign was one of the great joys of my life, I think we did have a big impact. I think there was a question mark over the future of the Shankill and I’m not sure what would have happened if the community had not risen up and said we are not taking anymore of this”. “Over a three to four year period the ‘Save The Shankill’ campaign was probably one of the most successful community action campaigns in the UK. It really took the planners on. We opposed the motorway happening, we stopped the building of the flats, we turned plans on their heads and got terraced housing put back, we stopped the demolition of Shankill shops, really the ‘Save The Shankill’ campaign did do what it said on the tin, it was a very exciting time” Jackie learned was that it was difficult to get the NI Housing Executive to start building. “It ended up that you had acres of land left derelict” In 1977, Jackie left the Shankill Community Council and started working at the Shankill Education Workshop. “It was ahead of its time. It was trying to out education the forefront. We started publishing a community newspaper called The Shankill Bulletin. It started of as an A4 news sheet that we was printed at the Print Workshop in Belfast (located in Just Books). We thought if we turned this into a proper tabloid newspaper maybe this could work. A local newspaper is so important, it gives a voice to the area, it strengthens the identity of an area when the area itself feels under threat, it allows you to raise issues, it can hold government and others in authority to account if done properly and it can also be a big voice in terms of sanity in the area in scotching rumours. I mean this was through the worst of The Troubles”. “We did fight a lot of issues, not least of which was a whole succession of imposed rent increases, that made people’s lives very difficult. We could mobilise hundreds of people at that time and closed parts of north and west Belfast for protests”.

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            • Our Generation: In Conversation with Nelson McCausland

              59:03

              from Northern Visions NvTv / Added

              Born in 1951 in north Belfast Nelson grew up on the Ballysillan Road. He remembers attending the Belfast Royal Academy. “I did find it somewhat strange, because most of the children going to the Academy were from a more affluent background….” Nelson studied physics at Oxford and returned to Belfast, firstly to train as a teacher at Queens University and then to become a teacher at Ballygomartin Boys School. Nelson’s interest in politics began at school and would develop further at Oxford. “….that period from 1966 with the Malvern Street shootings, the first emergence of the civil rights movement around 1968, I was going off to University at that point. In Oxford, you had a very strong Irish contingent, there were Irish folk clubs and also, beside the college I was in, there was another college which was a trade union college, Ruskin College. There were folk from here over studying, who would be very much to the far left in politics.” Nelson’s political career began during the 1982 Northern Ireland Assembly elections, standing in North Belfast for the United Ulster Unionist Party. The party had emerged from a division in the Vanguard Progressive Unionist Party in the lat 1970s, which opposed the concept of compulsory power sharing with nationalists in the Sunningdale Agreement. The party was dissolved in 1984. Nelson finally succeeded in gaining election for the Castle area of north Belfast in 1989, as an Independent Unionist. Re-elected as an independent Unionist in 1993 Nelson announced that he would join the Ulster Unionist Party. He went on to become the High Sheriff of Belfast in 1997. Disenchanted with the UUP he joined the Democratic Unionist Party. The DUP was originally involved in negotiations that led to the Belfast Agreement (Good Friday Agreement). “I don’t think people ever believed we would get to that point where a Sinn Fein Minister would stand on the steps of Stormont Castle with the Chief Constable and the leader of the DUP”. Nelson talks about the Ulster Scots Movement. He was the Director of the Ulster-Scots Heritage Council. “Growing up in the 1950s, there was a very strong sense of the Scottish influence in Ulster. We never had television programmes in Northern Ireland that ever mentioned the Republic, but I remember you always watched ‘Doctor Finlay’s Casebook’ and the original black and white version of Para Handy and the White Heather Club, so I grew up knowing all the wee Scottish songs. The record collection in the house reflected that. When you went to Portrush for your holidays or Bangor in the summer if it was the Glasgow Fair, the place was just full of Scots. Come the Twelfth, there was an influx of Scots as well, so you had this East-West connection which was very strong. We may not have called it Ulster Scots at that time, although the term Ulster Scots goes back to the middle of the 17th century and we had this 400 year history but never the less it was a part of me.” Nelson was fascinated about the Ulster Scots history in Belfast and how it was a rich part of the city’s heritage, one which should be preserved and celebrated. “If you want to understand Northern Ireland, you don’t go down the old government line of there are two traditions here. There may be two main political traditions and two main religious traditions but culturally we’re much more diverse, if you go down to Downpatrick, the three streets that meet at the traffic lights are English Street, Irish Street and Scots Street and that’s Northern Ireland.” Nelson is the Chair of the Ulster Scots Community Network, and believes more of Ulster Scots heritage should be taught in schools. “It’s actually a human rights issue, under the UN Convention, children are entitled to know about their culture to be taught about it and have it affirmed in the school, that hasn’t happened.” “The way that you affirm any culture is you put it into schools and put it on the television. If you are not on the television, you might as well not exist, that’s why more programmes about Ulster Scots culture and history and language on television are important.” Nelson is positive about Northern Ireland’s future. “There’s no going back to the terrorism of the past. The legacy of it is going to be with us for another generation in the terms of the damage that it has done but the one positive thing there is that there can’t be a going back to it, anyone who thinks they can go back to it, they’re going to be marginalised.” Nelson has been a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly since 2003. In 2009 he was appointed Minister of Culture, Arts and Leisure and in 2011 Minister for Social Development.

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              • Our Generation In Conversation with Joe Baker

                43:35

                from Northern Visions NvTv / Added

                Local historian and prolific writer, Joe Baker, talks to Michael Elliott about his life and how it could have turned out very differently. When Joe left school he could barely read and write. From the Barrack area of the New Lodge, Joe was constantly in and out of trouble. His interest in local history began in these days when he and his friends drank cider and sniffed glue in the local graveyard and the only real pastime was reading the tombstone inscriptions. Joe got involved in the local community at a young age when he joined the 'Recy' community centre and attended meetings about anti-social activity. He has since worked tirelessly on issues such as housing and youth work, and contributed towards the establishment of the Ashton Centre. Joe Baker recently published his autobiography entitled 'Hooligan to Historian: The Life and Times of Joe Baker (so far!)'.

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                • Our Generation In Conversation with Eileen Bell

                  44:25

                  from Northern Visions NvTv / Added

                  Eileen Bell CBE has an extensive background in community development and constituency politics, which has led to her to become an influential figure in Northern Ireland. Her first realisation of a sense of justice and social issues came when "we were put out of our home twice and... I knew other people were having an even worse time than I was, and I thought this just isn't right." With the 'Peace People' she worked as Welfare Worker with prisoners' families and people who suffered intimidation, and with the Peace Train, she acted as Coordinator organising 4 of the 5 Peace Trains between Belfast-Dublin, Belfast- Derry and Belfast-London. Eileen worked with the Alliance Party since the 1980s, having various responsibilities, including Deputy Leader and Speaker to the Transitional Assembly in April 2006. Despite retiring from political life on Devolution Day in May 2007, she continues to work extensively with many groups and worthy causes, such as Women into Politics and Autism N.I.

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                  • Six Miles North - Closer Apart [rosa's grave]

                    05:08

                    from JOURNEYFOR / Added

                    422 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Written, recorded and produced 13 Dec 2011. Filmed by journeyfor. in Belfast Sat 3rd March 2012

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                    • City Council March 6, 2012

                      01:54:52

                      from City of Belfast / Added

                      80 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      This is the regular meeting of the Belfast City Council

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