1. A Biopunk Manifesto by Meredith Patterson

    09:06

    from SMA / Added

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    Scientific literacy is necessary for a functioning society in the modern age. Scientific literacy is not science education. A person educated in science can understand science; a scientifically literate person can *do* science. Scientific literacy empowers everyone who possesses it to be active contributors to their own health care, the quality of their food, water, and air, their very interactions with their own bodies and the complex world around them. Society has made dramatic progress in the last hundred years toward the promotion of education, but at the same time, the prevalence of citizen science has fallen. Who are the twentieth-century equivalents of Benjamin Franklin, Edward Jenner, Marie Curie or Thomas Edison? Perhaps Steve Wozniak, Bill Hewlett, Dave Packard or Linus Torvalds -- but the scope of their work is far narrower than that of the natural philosophers who preceded them. Citizen science has suffered from a troubling decline in diversity, and it is this diversity that biohackers seek to reclaim. We reject the popular perception that science is only done in million-dollar university, government, or corporate labs; we assert that the right of freedom of inquiry, to do research and pursue understanding under one's own direction, is as fundamental a right as that of free speech or freedom of religion. We have no quarrel with Big Science; we merely recall that Small Science has always been just as critical to the development of the body of human knowledge, and we refuse to see it extinguished. Research requires tools, and free inquiry requires that access to tools be unfettered. As engineers, we are developing low-cost laboratory equipment and off-the-shelf protocols that are accessible to the average citizen. As political actors, we support open journals, open collaboration, and free access to publicly-funded research, and we oppose laws that would criminalize the possession of research equipment or the private pursuit of inquiry. Perhaps it seems strange that scientists and engineers would seek to involve themselves in the political world -- but biohackers have, by necessity, committed themselves to doing so. The lawmakers who wish to curtail individual freedom of inquiry do so out of ignorance and its evil twin, fear -- the natural prey and the natural predator of scientific investigation, respectively. If we can prevail against the former, we will dispel the latter. As biohackers it is our responsibility to act as emissaries of science, creating new scientists out of everyone we meet. We must communicate not only the value of our research, but the value of our methodology and motivation, if we are to drive ignorance and fear back into the darkness once and for all. We the biopunks are dedicated to putting the tools of scientific investigation into the hands of anyone who wants them. We are building an infrastructure of methodology, of communication, of automation, and of publicly available knowledge. Biopunks experiment. We have questions, and we don't see the point in waiting around for someone else to answer them. Armed with curiosity and the scientific method, we formulate and test hypotheses in order to find answers to the questions that keep us awake at night. We publish our protocols and equipment designs, and share our bench experience, so that our fellow biopunks may learn from and expand on our methods, as well as reproducing one another's experiments to confirm validity. To paraphrase Eric Hughes, "Our work is free for all to use, worldwide. We don't much care if you don't approve of our research topics." We are building on the work of the Cypherpunks who came before us to ensure that a widely dispersed research community cannot be shut down. Biopunks deplore restrictions on independent research, for the right to arrive independently at an understanding of the world around oneself is a fundamental human right. Curiosity knows no ethnic, gender, age, or socioeconomic boundaries, but the opportunity to satisfy that curiosity all too often turns on economic opportunity, and we aim to break down that barrier. A thirteen-year-old kid in South Central Los Angeles has just as much of a right to investigate the world as does a university professor. If thermocyclers are too expensive to give one to every interested person, then we'll design cheaper ones and teach people how to build them. Biopunks take responsibility for their research. We keep in mind that our subjects of interest are living organisms worthy of respect and good treatment, and we are acutely aware that our research has the potential to affect those around us. But we reject outright the admonishments of the precautionary principle, which is nothing more than a paternalistic attempt to silence researchers by inspiring fear of the unknown. When we work, it is with the betterment of the community in mind -- and that includes our community, your community, and the communities of people that we may never meet. We welcome your questions, and we desire nothing more than to empower you to discover the answers to them yourselves. The biopunks are actively engaged in making the world a place that everyone can understand. Come, let us research together. This video is from the Outlaw Biology? Conference at UCLA. http://outlawbiology.net/

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    • A Map of Balad Airbase grown in-vitro, 2008

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      from Christina Nguyen Hung / Added

      Time-lapse of living maps showing military airbases in Iraq grown with the bacterium Serratia marcescens in petri dishes. This culture shows Balad Airbase being overtaken by insurgent spiders. Using a modified* lithography printing process often used in cellular biology, I printed the bacteria in the shape of US military airbases in Iraq as presented in Google Earth from 2007-2009. This time-lapse piece was part of an installation produced for ISEA 2008 and presented in the session "Bio-Mediations" http://www.isea2008singapore.org/conference/conf_schedule_26.html A creative form of sousveillance, American Vectors is one of many artworks I made beginning in 2004 in which I appropriated* the tools and techniques of cellular and micro-biology to create images that reframe and destabilize the rhetoric surrounding the US military invasion and occupation of Iraq. For more examples of this and other work see christinahung.net My use of the bacterium Serratia marcesence began in 2004 as a gesture of support and in solidarity with the artist Steven Kurtz, my friend and mentor. Following the untimely death of his wife Hope, Steve was detained for 22 hours without charge on suspicion of "bioterrorism." For more on Steve's story see http://www.caedefensefund.org/faq.html and Lynn Herhman Leeson's film Strange Culture http://www.strangeculture.net I had the honor of writing a remembrance of Hope for the Brooklyn Rail in 2004 http://www.brooklynrail.org/2004/07/art/hope *Historically I have always used the terms "appropriation" and "modification" to describe my use of these tools and techniques. The recent popularization of bioart and the rise in usage of associated terms such as "biohacking," and "DIY bio," may also be applied to this work.

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      • American Vectors (time-lapse version), 2009

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        from Christina Nguyen Hung / Added

        Living maps of military airbases in Iraq grown with the bacterium Serratia marcescens in petri dishes. Using a modified* lithography printing process often used in cellular biology, I printed the bacteria in the shape of US military airbases in Iraq as presented in Google Earth from 2007-2009. This time-lapse piece was part of an installation produced for the exhibition "FREEZE: 2009 International Medtech Art Show," curated by Laza Wu and Shang-min Chien at the National Taiwan Museum at of Fine Arts in Taichung Taiwan, 2009. http://freeze.ntmofa.gov.tw Audio for the time-lapse by artist, Clarke Curtis http://www.clarkecurtis.com/ A creative form of sousveillance, American Vectors is one of many artworks I made beginning in 2004 in which I appropriated* the tools and techniques of cellular and micro-biology to create images that reframe and destabilize the rhetoric surrounding the US military invasion and occupation of Iraq. For more examples of this and other work see http://christinahung.net My use of the bacterium Serratia marcesence began in 2004 as a gesture of support and in solidarity with the artist Steven Kurtz, my friend and mentor. Following the untimely death of his wife Hope, Steve was detained for 22 hours without charge on suspicion of "bioterrorism." For more on Steve's story see http://www.caedefensefund.org/faq.html and Lynn Herhman Leeson's film Strange Culture http://www.strangeculture.net I had the honor of writing a remembrance of Hope for the Brooklyn Rail in 2004 http://www.brooklynrail.org/2004/07/art/hope *Historically I have always used the terms "appropriation" and "modification" to describe my use of these tools and techniques. The recent popularization of bioart and the rise in usage of associated terms such as "biohacking," and "DIY bio," may also be applied to this work.

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        • And Then One Day

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          from Seth Blaustein / Added

          115 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Story by Max Borders Script by Max Borders and Seth Blaustein Directed and Edited by Seth Blaustein Voice Over: Joseph Andrade Visuals Credits: Extreme eye macro | Patrick Letourneau | http://polygons.ca/ Lancome LaVieEstBelle 2014 | Gunter Freese | https://www.xing.com/profile/Gunter_Freese The Infinite in Between | Void Visuals | http://voidvisuals.com/en/ The Node | Murat Pak | http://undream.net/ Climate Change | Globaia | http://globaia.org/ The Third & The Seventh | Alex Roman | http://www.thirdseventh.com/ The Velella Mariculture Research Project | Kampachi Farm | http://www.kampachifarm.com/offshore-technology/ Great Bear Rainforest in 4K | Devin Graham | https://www.youtube.com/user/devinsupertramp Wanderers | Erik Wernquist | http://www.erikwernquist.com/

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          • 26 Anna Dumitriu: The MRSA Quilt

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            from BIO·FICTION / Added

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            “The MRSA Quilt” was created by embedding squares of cotton calico in chromogenic agar. This bacterial growth medium contains a dye that is taken up by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, causing them to grow blue in colour and stain the calico. The patterns on the quilt squares are created using various tools and techniques in the treatment and diagnosis of infections caused by this bacterium and its drug resistant form, known as MRSA (Methicillin or Multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus). These patterns include stripes and polka dots created using antibiotic susceptibility tests, as well as embroideries made using thread dyed using natural antimicrobials such as turmeric or safflower. Dumitriu has led numerous participatory workshops, where members of the public can make their own DIY experiments with natural antimicrobials and bacteria to create quilt squares. Made in collaboration with Dr John Paul, Dr James Price, and biomedical scientist Kevin Cole. http://www.normalflora.co.uk Anna DUMITRIU Independent artist, Institute of Unnecessary Research, UK Anna Dumitriu’s work is at the forefront of art and microbiology collaboration, with a strong interest in the ethical impact of emerging technologies. Her installations, interventions and performances use a range of digital, biological and traditional media including live bacteria, and are regularly exhibited internationally. She is Artist in Residence on the Modernising Medical Microbiology Project at The University of Oxford and won the 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology Communication Award. Her major Wellcome Trust funded project “The Romantic Disease: An Artistic Investigation of Tuberculosis” is currently on show at Art Laboratory Berlin as part of a solo retrospective.

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            • 11 Anna Dumitriu: Trust Me, I’m an Artist - Towards an Ethics of Art and Science Collaboration

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              “Trust Me, I’m an Artist: Towards an Ethics of Art and Science Collabo- ration” is a project and new book by Anna Dumitriu and Professor Bobbie Farsides, which investigates novel ethical issues arising through art and science collaboration and considers the roles and responsibilities of the artists, scientists and institutions involved. The project focusses on bioart or biomedical art and features projects by Adam Zaretsky, Neal White, Art Orienté objet, and Anna Dumitriu herself. Dumitriu proposed to build a containment level 2 bacteriology lab in an art gal- lery to enable the public to work hands on with pathogenic bacteria in a supervised setting as well as widening participation in DIY microbiology techniques. A progression of “Trust Me, I’m an Artist” was recently funded by the Creative Europe programme and will take place over the next two years. http://www.artscienceethics.com Anna DUMITRIU Independent artist, Institute of Unnecessary Research, UK Anna Dumitriu’s work is at the forefront of art and microbiology collaboration, with a strong interest in the ethical impact of emerging technologies. Her installations, interventions and performances use a range of digital, biological and traditional media including live bacteria, and are regularly exhibited internationally. She is Artist in Residence on the Modernising Medical Microbiology Project at The University of Oxford and won the 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology Communication Award. Her major Wellcome Trust funded project “The Romantic Disease: An Artistic Investigation of Tuberculosis” is currently on show at Art Laboratory Berlin as part of a solo retrospective.

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              • 33 Asi Burak: Games for Change

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                With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility The talk will address the power of digital games as a maturing medium and a largely untapped tool “for good”. It will make an impassioned case for using games for social impact and learning, with an overview of the latest trends and core challenges. Burak will share some case studies and success stories including his unique entry to the field, leading the team behind the award-winning game “PeaceMaker” around the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Attendees will learn about the field at large and how Games for Change is leading the future of this movement with a coalition of public and private partners. Asi BURAK Games for Change, USA Asi Burak is an award-winning game creator, tech executive, and social entrepreneur. He is the President of Games for Change (G4C), a nonprofit with the mission to catalyze social impact through digital game. As the Executive Producer of the Half the Sky Movement games, he orchestrated partnerships with Zynga, some of the world’s leading NGOs and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn. The Facebook game has reached 1.3 million registered players and generated $500,000 in donations. Prior to that, Burak co-founded Impact Games and created the internationally acclaimed “PeaceMaker” and “Play the News” gaming platforms. He also served as a consultant to companies such as EON Productions (007), Newsweek and McCann Erickson, around the strategic use of games to further brand engagement. A native of Israel, Burak was Vice President of Marketing and Product at Axis Mobile (acquired 2008), where he introduced pioneering mobile apps and games to a worldwide market (Asia, Europe, U.S.). He is a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts’ MFA in Design for Social Innovation and holds a Master of Entertainment Technology from Carnegie Mellon University.

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                • At the Singularity Summit in Amsterdam, Peter Diamandis gets an NFC Implant (nov 2014)

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                  from martijn aslander / Added

                  2,660 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Peter just joined the growing network of biohackers that are curious to find out how we can combine technology with biology. What to do with NFC in your hand? That's like the same question you ask when you ask: 'What to do with a ac/dc-socket?' It depends which kind of device you plug in. Endless possibilities like storing Bitcoins in your body or opening an NFC-enabled door :) This chip is developed by Amal Graafstra. The guy that helped Peter is Tom van Oudenaarde, a piercing artist who is experienced with implanting stuff under your skinn. Always aks this kind of experts to help and never try it yourself :) http://singularityu.org/ http://www.diamandis.com/ http://www.exponentialorgs.com/ http://dangerousthings.com/ https://twitter.com/piercingutrecht

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                  • Biocurious: Eri Gentry

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                    from Make: / Added

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                    Eri Gentry talks about Biocurious, a group that encourages diy bio labs and associated hacking. At Maker Faire Bay Area 2011 Gentry stresses the importance of play and socialization with other makers in finding biology innovations.

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                    • BioHack Academy Class 4 (2015-03-10) Part 2

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                      from Open Wetlab / Added

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                      The fourth class of the BioHack Academy, part 2

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