1. Batoor's Journey

    25:05

    from Batoor Added 1,200 2 0

    Barat Ali Batoor, a Hazara asylum seeker records a perilous journey as a boat packed with more than 90 people starts to take water off the Indonesian coast. Batoor records panicked calls for help from fellow Afghans on the boat, which ends up crashing onto a beach on a remote Indonesian island. The asylum seeker tells Mark Davis of his terrifying journey. Batoor also speaks of his voyage from Kabul which he had documented with a series of extraordinary photographs – after he fled his homeland, fearing that Taliban gunmen would target him for his work with US forces. He is now in limbo in Indonesia with others from Afghanistan who are looking for ways to make it to Australia.

    + More details
    • Belmondo-Workshop (Teaser.2)

      00:48

      from Paul Potey Added 1,000 0 0

      + More details
      • The Pirogue / La Pirogue (2012) - Trailer

        01:59

        from Unifrance Films Added 193 2 0

        Directed by Moussa Touré Produced by La Chauve-Souris Genres : Fiction - Runtime : 1 h 27 min French release : 17/10/2012 Production year : 2011 Baye Laye is the captain of a fishing pirogue. Like many of his Senegalese compatriots, he sometimes dreams of new horizons, where he can earn a better living for his family. When he is offered to captain one of the many pirogues that head towards Europe via the Canary Islands, he reluctantly accepts the job, knowing full-well the dangers that lie ahead. Leading a group of 30 men who don't all speak the same language, some of whom have never seen the sea, Baye Laye will confront many perils in order to reach the distant coasts of Europe. http://en.unifrance.org/movie/33096/the-pirogue

        + More details
        • After the War - Sarah Slean (Vietnamese Boat People)

          04:24

          from Granako Added 252 1 0

          Vietnamese boat people After the Vietnam War, many people in Cambodia, Laos, and especially Vietnam became refugees in the late 1970s and 1980s, after the fall of Saigon. In Vietnam, the new communist government sent many people who supported the old government in the South to "re-education camps", and others to "new economic zones". Lê Duẩn purged South Vietnamese who had fought against the North, imprisoning over one million people and setting off the mass exodus and humanitarian disaster. In 1979, Vietnam was again at war (Sino-Vietnamese War) with the People's Republic of China (PRC). The Vietnamese government forced the entire ethnic Chinese community to perform slave labor in the jungle with minimal food or to leave the country; the majority of Chinese, who lived in the south, had no way to escape except on the open seas. On the open seas, the boat people had to face deadly storms, diseases and starvation, and elude pirates. According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, between 200,000 and 400,000 boat people died at sea. After the War (Lyrics) "After the War" After the guns are silent After your wounds have healed After those crosses have been planted in all those fields After that long boat ride All the way across the sea And after this train carries thee Chorus: I will love you after the war I'll love you for always, forever more I will love you after the war Forever, for always, and more After your boots dry And the tobacco's all but gone Along with all those postcards you've carried under your arm After I remember all the words I couldn't say And after this long night fades away I will love you after the war I'll love you for always, forever more I will love you after the war Forever, for always, and more After this blackbird Lifts up from off your chest After your soul takes its final rest My love, I forgive you; you never planned to die And Love, I'll place two pennies over your eyes I will love you after the war I'll love you for always, forever more I will love you after the war Forever, for always, and more

          + More details
          • OJW Perth Feb 2013 "Refugees: Where Do They Come From?"

            01:26:21

            from One Just World Added 185 0 0

            Refugees and asylum seekers have been a topic of hot debate in Australia for over a decade. With all the hype around this topic and considering the 5.2 million recognised refugees and 42 million displaced people worldwide, we must ask ourselves - what is it that forces so many to leave their homelands and the familiarity of their heritage? Many flee for fear of persecution due to race, religion, nationality or sometimes simply due to a political opinion that is deemed inappropriate. Then there are others who are forced to leave due to civil conflict, famine, drought or natural disaster. Every single one is a real person, not just a number. They are refugees, not by choice, but by necessity. So what needs to happen to prevent so many from being driven from their homes, often in fear of their lives? What needs to occur to halt the environmental changes affecting them and to facilitate peace-building where it’s needed? How can we help those affected by such desperate circumstances? And how do we ensure their safety as they search for somewhere safe to start over? How can we, as global citizens, prevent so many women and men, boys and girls, from having to endure such horrific circumstances? And how can we empower them to address the issues before the situation becomes so unbearable that fleeing is the only option left?

            + More details
            • OJW Bunbury Feb 2013 "Refugees: Where Do They Come From?"

              01:30:36

              from One Just World Added 64 0 0

              Refugees and asylum seekers have been a topic of hot debate in Australia for over a decade. With all the hype around this topic and considering the 5.2 million recognised refugees and 42 million displaced people worldwide, we must ask ourselves - what is it that forces so many to leave their homelands and the familiarity of their heritage? Many flee for fear of persecution due to race, religion, nationality or sometimes simply due to a political opinion that is deemed inappropriate. Then there are others who are forced to leave due to civil conflict, famine, drought or natural disaster. Every single one is a real person, not just a number. They are refugees, not by choice, but by necessity. So what needs to happen to prevent so many from being driven from their homes, often in fear of their lives? What needs to occur to halt the environmental changes affecting them and to facilitate peace-building where it’s needed? How can we help those affected by such desperate circumstances? And how do we ensure their safety as they search for somewhere safe to start over? How can we, as global citizens, prevent so many women and men, boys and girls, from having to endure such horrific circumstances? And how can we empower them to address the issues before the situation becomes so unbearable that fleeing is the only option left?

              + More details
              • Adam Simmons - 'boat music' - performance excerpt - ANAM Quartetthaus

                10:17

                from Fat Rain Music Added 934 0 0

                10 Minute excerpt of the performance of 'boat music' , sculptural music box created by Adam Simmons - filmed at ANAM Quartetthaus, Sep 2012. Performed by David Brown, Howard Cairns, Annabel Warmington and Adam Simmons.

                + More details
                • THE DEPARTURE

                  01:54:38

                  from Mark Mangion Added 292 1 0

                  The season is unclear; we might say autumn just as easily as we might say spring. Down in Marsamxetto harbour the weather is fair; blue, sunny skies with light winds. Five men are about to set out on a sailing boat to enjoy an afternoon at sea. Apart from Gerald, who owns the boat, the men seem awkward on board, dressed in leather jackets and tracksuits, they can only watch as Gerald unties the boat and raises the anchor. Yet all of these men have travelled by sea before, though it was out of necessity, in the hope of starting a better life. This is the first time that an experienced sailor is on board with them. Perhaps this is the first time that they are leaving the island on which they have lived for several years. Perhaps they are friends, or perhaps this is a staged attempt to create a fly-on –the-mast documentary by a sixth person, whose presence is only sensed rather than seen. Where in Africa are they from? How long have they been living on this island? What are their names? What do they do for a living? How old are they? Are they happy living here or would they like to sail north to Italy? Is that a wife or girlfriend calling them up all the time? As the boat reaches the mouth of the harbour one of the men expresses his real fear of the open sea, and talks about the gruelling crossing he experienced, and so Gerald decides it would be best to turn back and practice sailing inside the harbour. This failure to conquer the waves brings us a little closer to the personal histories of these men, who reached North Africa and climbed into a boat on the Libyan coast, a crowded boat without a navigator, to cross the Mediterranean sea and hopefully drift into European waters. Tension eases, the men begin to steer the boat and a poignant humour and affinity begins to emerge. Between the long, loud mobile phone calls and the vibrant humour, Gerald invites the men to listen to the silence. Out here you forget about everything, he says. It is at this point, perhaps, that we become aware that there are in fact six men on board, an unknown eye behind the camera. There is no edit, no manipulation and no intrusive questioning, the sixth person on board is as curious as we are about what happens when distinctly different people are brought together in close proximity, where trust must be established, and where one man’s fears can be overcome by the guidance and confidence of another. Ultimately this journey has no final destination, leisure and sport are the only factors for going out to sea this time, concepts which may seem almost vulgar to men who spent uncertain days on a rudimentary boat in order to reach a more bounteous land. However, as the boat returns to shore the men appear to be sitting comfortably, each seems to have found his space and it seems possible that they could ease into this thing called sailing – travelling across water for nothing more than pleasure. (Emma Mattei) DIRECTED BY MARK MANGION CINEMATOGRAPHY MARK MANGION EDITING MARK MANGION PRODUCTION MARK MANGION CAST JOHN UDO HAKIM BABANGIDA ERIC NYANDU IBRAHIM MUSAH GEARLD MONTANARO GAUCI THANKS JOHN UDO HAKIM BABANGIDA ERIC NYANDU IBRAHIM MUSAH GEARLD MONTANARO GAUCI FILMED ON LOCATION IN MALTA DURATION 1:54:00 FORMAT 16.9 DV VIDEO COLOUR DATE (2007)

                  + More details
                  • THE NIGHT BEFORE THE RICKY HATTON VS. FLOYD MAYWEATHER FIGHT

                    02:02:11

                    from Mark Mangion Added 274 1 0

                    A ferocious wind whipping up the fire around which eight men are seated. They are about to cook up some lamb and drink a few beers. It is night, somewhere in the countryside, out at sea a storm is brewing, the fire will provide warmth, the fire will cook the food, the men will sit around the fire until the small hours of the morning when the boxing match will begin, they’ll need to drink and talk until then, whilst stoking the fire and cooking the meat and showing their expertise with all things outdoors. Out of the darkness English is being spoken in many inflections. There are glimpses of hands and eyes and movement, all eyes are on the fire, everyone’s hungry but they must wait, they must drink Cisk lager and talk: we can organise a friendly advance left hand side german shepherds will eat you kill bacteria butter potato plane crashes twice dictator Macedonia once burnt foil Brixton salt more salt grandmother ants ricky hatton elephant shit stone roses you’re still my idol. There is silence, laughter, singing, tension, awkwardness, wit, hunger, thirst, misunderstandings, understandings, there is psychobabble, attempts to bridge gaping chasms, clumsy political referencing and epic story telling. Who these men are and why they are gathered here is never made explicit, no one asks any direct questions and each one of them speaks in his own parables, though it is quickly understood that some of the men are of European extraction, whilst others are men who were born and raised in Africa but are no longer living there. Is this how we communicate? Are we always so clumsy yet so endearing in our attempts to smash artifice and create the possibility for honest connections? It is the European men who feel the pressure to talk after long silences, they are a little maladroit but in their initiative they are winsome too, and so the lamb and potatoes are eaten and the wind continues to blow as we listen to tales from Congo and Serbia, Brixton and Sudan being exchanged on the island of Malta in the middle of the Mediterranean sea. (Emma Mattei) DIRECTED BY MARK MANGION CINEMATOGRAPHY MARK MANGION EDITING MARK MANGION PRODUCTION MARK MANGION CAST HAKIM BABANGIDA JON BANTHORPE JOSHUA DE GIORGIO JULIAN MCEWEN IBRAHIM MUSAH ERIC NYANDU JOHN UDO SLAVKO VUKANOVIC THANKS HAKIM BABANGIDA JON BANTHORPE JOSHUA DE GIORGIO JULIAN MCEWEN IBRAHIM MUSAH ERIC NYANDU JOHN UDO SLAVKO VUKANOVIC FILMED ON LOCATION IN MALTA DURATION 2:02:00 FORMAT 16.9 DV VIDEO COLOUR DATE (2007)

                    + More details
                    • Adam Simmons - 'boat music' - sculptural music box at ANAM Quartetthaus

                      03:08

                      from Fat Rain Music Added 627 2 0

                      An insight into the sculptural music box created by Adam Simmons - filmed here in rehearsal and performance at ANAM Quartetthaus, Sep 2012. Performed by David Brown, Howard Cairns, Annabel Warmington and Adam Simmons.

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."