1. TERRA 817: Silencing the Thunder

    07:30

    from Life On TERRA Added 94 0 0

    Silencing the Thunder exposes the controversy surrounding the disease brucellosis and whether or not Yellowstone National Park’s bison population should be heavily managed because of it. Produced by Eddie Roqueta.

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    • TERRA 806: Winter Range

      15:09

      from Life On TERRA Added 229 1 0

      Winter Range is a documentary film that explores the consequences of rising levels of the livestock disease Brucellosis in elk in the Greater Yellowstone Area. New elk behavior patterns, often attributed to pressure from wolves and hunters, has brought them within critical proximity to cattle consequently making brucellosis a constant threat to the livelihoods of Montana livestock producers. Winter Range features a Montana rancher who reveals the measures, or lack their of, that she has to take to protect her cattle from infected elk and brucellosis. At the heart of the problem is a conflict between people and wildlife and at the heart of this film is a story about the complexity of managing the “political disease.”

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      • Winter Range

        14:47

        from Erik Rochner Added 231 5 3

        A film about the livestock disease brucellosis and the conflict that it creates between people and wildlife in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

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        • Brucellosis in Montana

          05:59

          from Erik Rochner Added 67 0 0

          Interview with Dr. Martin Zaluski on brucellosis in Montana

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          • One drop in the eye - Nje pike ne sy

            05:23

            from Ulrich Roth Added 16 0 0

            This 5 min video was produced as training video for over 750 Albanian veterinarians that will carry out on behalf of the State Veterinary Service of Albania a nationwide brucellosis vaccination campaign. During the 2012 National Brucellosis Vaccination Campaign a number of more than 2.5 mio sheep and goats of about 85.000 animal holders will be vaccinated. This Vaccination Campaign is supported by the EU and carried out by the PAZA Project (www.paza-albania.eu).

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            • Project 1: Proximity Collars

              06:56

              from Erik Rochner Added 101 0 0

              Project 1. Estimating contact-group size relationships with proximity collars • Hyp. 1.1. Elk-elk and elk-fetus contact rates increase with group size and the provisioning of food (via effects of density at a very local scale). • Hyp. 1.2. The effects of age, disease status, weather and snowpack on contact rates are minor relative to group size effects. Project 1. Fine-scale estimation of contact rates: How individuals contact one another plays a key role in disease dynamics—by influencing seasonal patterns of infection. We are using a recently developed proximity collar technology to continuously monitor elk-elk and elk-fetus contacts as a function of group size, time of year, supplemental feeding, ambient conditions, and an individual’s disease status. These proximity collars, made by Sirtrack Ltd., log the time, date, and duration that individuals are within a user-defined detection range of other collared individuals. We initiated this study in Jan. 2009 with 60 female elk captured on two feedgrounds and the collars were recovered in Jan. 2010. We also placed proximity loggers under elk fetuses and at random sites without fetuses to estimate elk-fetus contact, the degree of attraction to fetuses, and the effects of altered feeding regimes on these contact rates.

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              • Project 4: Genetics

                04:56

                from Erik Rochner Added 91 0 0

                Project 4. Genetic analyses of host connectivity and cross-species transmission • Hyp. 4.1. Host species will be a better predictor of Brucella abortus genetic similarity than geographic location reflecting a limited amount of cross-species transmission. • Hyp. 4.2. Few seropositive elk from unfed populations will be immigrants from the supplemental feedgrounds reflecting high levels of on-site transmission. Project 4. Genetic estimates of transmission & origins of infected elk Estimating the relationships between host density, transmission, and prevalence implicitly assumes that the disease dynamics are driven by local/internal processes rather than immigration from other populations or spill-over from other hosts. We will use genetic analyses of B. abortus isolates and elk to assess the amount of elk movement among populations and B. abortus transmission among species and populations.

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                • Yellowstone Bison

                  03:54

                  from Assignment Earth Added 160 0 0

                  On Yellowstone’s northern range, it’s easy to see why bison leave the national park in search of greener pastures during severe winters. Some bison even use the park highway to escape to lower elevations as they search for food. But, as they cross the park’s northern border near Gardiner, Montana, they traverse into an area where they are not necessarily welcome. The bison can carry a disease called brucellosis, which can cause them to spontaneously abort pregnancies and create other health hazards for the animals, as well as humans that come in contact with their meat or unpasteurized milk products. The disease, also carried by elk, can be transmitted to cattle. Ranchers in the area fear that contact with free-roaming bison will jeopardize the heath of their herds. “As long as we have the disease proliferated in the wildlife, our ranchers will have to undergo heightened surveillance, testing and management procedures, which do cost money, not to mention the sanctions that are put on Montana’s cattle by our trading partners,” says Errol Rice of the Montana Stockgrowers Association. So far, bison have not transmitted the disease to cattle, but elk, which freely roam outside of Yellowstone’s borders, have been known to infect cattle. Unlike elk, when bison leave Yellowstone, officials attempt to herd them back into the park, and when that fails, they corral them in a capture facility. Mark Pearson of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition says, “We’re facing this spring what we’ve feared we would face for the last couple of years, which is a large out-migration of bison from Yellowstone, because of the more severe winter we’re having.” During the last migration, in 2008, over 1,400 bison were captured and sent to slaughter. Bison once numbered in the millions in North America, but unregulated hunting and mass slaughter all but eliminated the species. Just 25 bison survived in Yellowstone In 1901. Thanks to restoration efforts, the Yellowstone herd today numbers well over 3000. It is the largest free-roaming wild bison herd in the country, but their freedom to roam has a limit. “In past years, as part of our component of the Inter-Agency Bison Management Plan, we have captured bison and we have handed them over to other IBMP partners, and they have been taken to slaughter in the past,” explains Al Nash of Yellowstone National Park. Recently, Montana governor Brian Schweitzer put a 90-day ban on shipping bison to slaughter. The federal government has also eased pressure on the billion-dollar Montana cattle industry by changing regulations regarding brucellosis. Ranchers are no longer required to slaughter their entire herd if a few animals are infected, and the whole state doesn’t risk losing it’s disease-free status over the infection of a few animals. With the new rules in place, state and federal officials have agreed to allow these bison to move into tens of thousands of acres outside Yellowstone which were previously off-limits to the bison. This allows the bison to roam more freely, while relying on the steep canyon to keep them from roaming too far beyond this area.

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                  • Yellowstone Bison

                    03:59

                    from This American Land Added 159 0 0

                    On Yellowstone’s northern range, it’s easy to see why bison leave the national park in search of greener pastures during severe winters. Some bison even use the park highway to escape to lower elevations as they search for food. But, as they cross the park’s northern border near Gardiner, Montana, they traverse into an area where they are not necessarily welcome. The bison can carry a disease called brucellosis, which can cause them to spontaneously abort pregnancies and create other health hazards for the animals, as well as humans that come in contact with their meat or unpasteurized milk products. The disease, also carried by elk, can be transmitted to cattle. Ranchers in the area fear that contact with free-roaming bison will jeopardize the heath of their herds. “As long as we have the disease proliferated in the wildlife, our ranchers will have to undergo heightened surveillance, testing and management procedures, which do cost money, not to mention the sanctions that are put on Montana’s cattle by our trading partners,” says Errol Rice of the Montana Stockgrowers Association. So far, bison have not transmitted the disease to cattle, but elk, which freely roam outside of Yellowstone’s borders, have been known to infect cattle. Unlike elk, when bison leave Yellowstone, officials attempt to herd them back into the park, and when that fails, they corral them in a capture facility. Mark Pearson of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition says, “We’re facing this spring what we’ve feared we would face for the last couple of years, which is a large out-migration of bison from Yellowstone, because of the more severe winter we’re having.” During the last migration, in 2008, over 1,400 bison were captured and sent to slaughter. Bison once numbered in the millions in North America, but unregulated hunting and mass slaughter all but eliminated the species. Just 25 bison survived in Yellowstone In 1901. Thanks to restoration efforts, the Yellowstone herd today numbers well over 3000. It is the largest free-roaming wild bison herd in the country, but their freedom to roam has a limit. “In past years, as part of our component of the Inter-Agency Bison Management Plan, we have captured bison and we have handed them over to other IBMP partners, and they have been taken to slaughter in the past,” explains Al Nash of Yellowstone National Park. Recently, Montana governor Brian Schweitzer put a 90-day ban on shipping bison to slaughter. The federal government has also eased pressure on the billion-dollar Montana cattle industry by changing regulations regarding brucellosis. Ranchers are no longer required to slaughter their entire herd if a few animals are infected, and the whole state doesn’t risk losing it’s disease-free status over the infection of a few animals. With the new rules in place, state and federal officials have agreed to allow these bison to move into tens of thousands of acres outside Yellowstone which were previously off-limits to the bison. This allows the bison to roam more freely, while relying on the steep canyon to keep them from roaming too far beyond this area.

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