1. Doris Matsui on CleanStart and Cleantech in the Capital Region

    00:41

    from SARTA / Added

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    Doris Matsui discusses the value of CleanStart and the growing clean tech industry in the Capital Region

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    • Dan Lankford on SARTA

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      Dan Lankford of Wavepoint Ventures discusses the value of SARTA to entrepreneurship in the Capital Region

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      • CleanStart Showcase -- Recap

        02:58

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        In past years, The Clean Tech Showcase has featured 800 attendees, 90 exhibitors, and 40+ speakers. Hear what attendees had to say in this short, content-packeted, recap video.

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        • Algae to Fuel

          05:37

          from Energy NOW / Added

          37 Plays / / 1 Comment

          Where will the next generation of motor fuels come from? It could be as close as your fish tank - or a nearby pond. In "Algae to Fuel," Chief Correspondent Tyler Suiters heads to a place where tourists focus on America's past, and students look to the future. 
In Colonial Williamsburg, students at the College of William & Mary are harvesting algae, or pond scum, for conversion into fuel. Algae be may unsightly in home aquariums, but in the wild, they're actually quite efficient at removing nutrients that pollute the water and metabolizing them as as oil. Tyler talks to William & Mary students, professors and a government official to learn how the program got started and where it's headed. The project has gotten attention not only from the U.S. Department of Energy, but from Norwegian energy firm Statoil. Those funding streams have helped the project take off. Now researchers are trying to determine how to develop it on a scale that could put a dent in America's petroleum use.

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          • Advice from the TSX: What investors want - Seven Hot Tips for Startups

            06:30

            from MaRS Discovery District / Added

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            Learn what cleantech and biotechnology investors want Tim Babcock and Raymond King, TSX Venture Exchange veterans discuss investor interest in the fields of biotechnology and cleantech and reveal how analysts set a valuation on your startup. The Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX Venture Exchange have been advising technology companies and analyzing investor interest for over one hundred years.

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            • Real-World Solutions for Algae Fuel

              04:57

              from Energy NOW / Added

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              Dennis Manos, Vice Provost for Research and Graduate/Professional Studies at the College of William and Mary, tells Tyler Suiters about how the school secured private funding for its school's algae to fuel project. The Norwegian energy company Statoil was brought on board after a group of college officials convinced the college's other private partners that the project was worthwhile. Statoil has a lot of influence over the project and can say which elements it likes and will pay for. It also approves of new partners. Manos says that's necessary because Statoil is the commercial entity that will eventually sell whatever product comes form this research. The algal fuel research project is also set to receive a Department of Energy grant that will pay for fundamental science issues and take the research in directions that the initial funding could not, such as removing metals and other contaminants from water and other applications for the algae besides producing fuel. Manos says the college changed its charter to include that aspect after running it by Statoil, in anticipation of receiving the DOE funding.

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              • The Science of Algae Fuel Research

                03:54

                from Energy NOW / Added

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                Emmett Duffy of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science explains the science of algal fuel research. Duffy and students from the College of William and Mary are cultivating natural algae on a pond. He says the algae are efficient and removing nutrient pollution from water. The students aim to repackage those nutrients and bring them back to soils, and produce fuel in the process. Duffy says the large quantities of biomass that algae produce can be converted to biodiesel, fermented into ethanol or digested into natural gas. He says the algae are also taking organic material out of the water that can be used as an organic fertilizer. He says the program has not yet researched how much energy goes into the fuel production, but he believes it's relatively better than other biofuel processes. Duffy says wild algae had an advantage over genetically modified algae is that they will grow anywhere, and that their fuel production is tied to reducing pollution in the water, which can't happen with algae in a bioreactor. The wild algae also don't have to be fertilized. They can use the nutrients that are already in the water. He says the general approach to producing algae has been used on a larger scale, but it has yet to produce fuel. The challenge, he says is finding out the most appropriate fuel to come from this biomass.

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                • Algae to Fuel Research at the College of William & Mary

                  08:41

                  from Energy NOW / Added

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                  Karl Kuschner of the College of William & Mary, who leads the school's algal fuel research project, explains how the program got its start and the focus of its research. Blackrock Energy, a local firm in the Williamsburg, Va., area, wanted to start an algae research program, so it started a consortium of companies that were interested, and also secured funding from the Norwegian energy company Statoil. They teamed with several other universities that are interested in the same research, and also with the Smithsonian Institution. Kuschner says as a neighbor of the Chesapeake Bay, William & Mary is interested in the research because it is environmentally friendly and because algae have a carbon-neutral fuel cycle. That helps the bay, because the algae can use nutrients that are considered pollution in the bay's ecosystem. Statoil funded the project for its first year and then renewed for another years starting in May of 2010. Although there are some 100 universities conducting algal research, Kuschner does not feel there is so much competition that the schools won't share information. He says his program's advantage is that it works with wild algae, not a certain species in a bioreactor. He says the process he's using does not use any energy, aside from the energy required to harvest the algae. Kuschner believes the technology is scalable, but in order to go to a commercial scale, it would probably have to use algae grown in the ocean, which can be a harsh, unpredictable environment. That's an engineering problem that other researchers are trying to solve. His team is solving the scientific problems of scaling, such as what types of nutrients, or how much water or carbon-dioxide is needed as the scale gets larger.

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                  • Special Valuation Series: Valuations in the cleantech industry - MaRS Best Practices

                    01:12:23

                    from MaRS Discovery District / Added

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                    Canada's biotechnology and cleantech communities have a history of developing world-leading technologies and a reputation for producing some of the best research minds in the world—but for these industries to grow, they must have access to new capital to fund research and development that will allow Canada to maintain its position as a world leader. The problem of a lack of capital is compounded by ever-increasing expectations from investors as to what they expect to see from companies before they consider an investment.

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                    • Is CCS The Only Way To Move Forward? Biggers Says No

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                      from Energy NOW / Added

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                      energyNOW! talks to Jeff Biggers, Author of "Reckoning at Eagle Creek" about his concerns about carbon capture and storage, which is a process that takes carbon from coal fired power plants and injects it deep underground.

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