1. "Speak On About the Spokes" (自行车的钢线)

    00:35

    from Liu Dao Added 10 0 0

    Spokes are such a goddamned boring topic unless you know something interesting about them. But, then I guess everything is like that unless it’s like the opposite of that. Their earliest appearance in modern society can be traced back to the Andronovo culture (groups who flourished in the region from western Siberia and the west Asiatic steppe) around 4,000 years ago. They were the brainchild of those who demanded faster, lighter, and swifter means of movement. There’s a concept that comes along with spokes called the maximum yeild minimality threshold. This is just a fancy way to say the fewest number of spokes a vehicle can have (taking the material they’re constructed of into consideration) without falling apart under the weight they’re supposed to be supporting. It’s a delightful idea isn’t it: to maybe clip them out from the wheel one at a time. Eventually you’ll cross the threshold. It probably won’t collapse right away. In fact, you often don’t know you’ve crossed that mysterious line until the moment you’re going full speed with everything to lose and you hear a funny noise. ARTIST: Liu Dao 六岛 MEDIA: RGB LED display, acrylic painting, paper collage, teakwood frame DATE: Made in island6, Shanghai 2015 SIZE: 90(W)×90(H)×5(D) cm | 35.5(W)×35.5(H)×2(D) inches CREDITS: Jin Yun 金云 (painting) • Zhang Tian Yi 张天伦 (performance) • Thomas Charvériat (art direction & technical guidance) • Anto Lau (art direction & animation) • Jean Le Guyader (documentation) • Yeung Sin Ching 杨倩菁 (production supervisor) • Adam Hsieh 谢昕 (production supervisor). To read more please visit: island6.org/SpeakOnAboutTheSpokes.html

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    • "The Observer Effect" (观察者效应)

      00:29

      from Liu Dao Added 26 1 0

      The very act of measuring something can change the thing. No matter how quiet you try to be or invisible you think you are. Watching is a manufactured idea that is a non-possibility- you are part of the scene. This is commonly known as the observer effect. The most widely used analogy for this is when you check the pressure of a tire, which is almost impossible to do without letting a little bit of air out. The observer effect is very real, so real in fact that it can be found in particle physics, thermodynamics, electronics and quantum mechanics. It has been responsible for countless scientific mistakes when not taken into account. I only bring this up because the noises you make while looking at this artwork might affect the very thing you’re observing. But did the other people around you affect your noises? And what affected them? ARTIST: Liu Dao 六岛 MEDIA: RGB LED display, Chinese papercut (Jian Zhi 剪紙), paper collage, sound sensor, 8-bit microcontroller, teakwood frame DATE: Made in island6, Shanghai 2015 SIZE: 103(W)×103(H)×5(D) cm | 40.5(W)×40.5(H)×2(D) inches CREDITS Tang Dashi 汤大师 & He Dashi 贺大师 (Chinese paper cutting 剪紙) • Anto Lau (art direction & video animation) • Thomas Charvériat (art direction & technical guidance) • Jean Le Guyader (documentation) • Yeung Sin Ching 杨倩菁 (production supervisor) • Adam Hsieh 谢昕 (production supervisor) • David Poppell(sound design) • Irmantas Bortnikas (video documentation). To read more please visit: island6.org/TheObserverEffect.html

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      • Options 选项

        00:31

        from Liu Dao Added 49 1 0

        We’ve got some choices to make. Stay here and burn or take our chances with the sharks and the waves and the icy, frothy chop. I prefer to burn I think but in that quick decision I’ve suddenly remembered a factoid I heard long ago. I heard that when you burn to death, your eyes explode before you actually die. Babe, I don’t want my goddamned eyes exploding. But maybe that’s better than treading until hypothermia and exhaustion kick in and I pathetically sink like a stone without even the slightest energy left to panic. Maybe that option is better than being ripped apart by hungry sharks though now that I sit and think about it more. I mean, exploding eyes don’t sound so bad when it’s up against have your limps torn off and swallowed right in front of you. If we don’t make a choice though, our indecision will choose for us. All I’m saying it this: we got options babe. At least a few. [Ryan Nimmo] ARTIST: Liu Dao 六岛 MEDIA: RGB LED display, Chinese papercut (Jian Zhi 剪紙), paper collage, IR sensor, 8-bit microcontroller, media player, teakwood frame, powered speakers. EDITION: Unique DATE: Made in island6, Shanghai 2015 SIZE: 130(W)×75(H)×7(D) cm | 51(W)×29.5(H)×2.75(D) inches CREDITS : Tang Dashi 汤大师 & He Dashi 贺大师 (Chinese paper cutting 剪紙) • Thomas Charvériat (art direction & technical guidance) • Anto Lau (video animation) • Jean Le Guyader (documentation) • Yeung Sin Ching 杨倩菁 (production supervisor) • Adam Hsieh 谢昕 (production supervisor) • David Poppell(sound design) • Irmantas Bortnikas (video documentation) To read more please visit: island6.org/Options.html

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        • "Broken Bones & Bruises" 骨肉之伤

          03:50

          from Liu Dao Added 78 0 0

          Sinew, spit, sensations, and slips - just how do we keep our bodies together with everything we put them through? Liu Dao has explored the mind, and it's high time they turned their LED eyes to the bodies that execute all the lewd, lustful, and lovely things our brains persuade us to do. DATES: From April 4th to June 18th, 2015 VERNISSAGE: Saturday, April 4th, from 7.00 - 10.00pm CURATION: Ryan Nimmo & Kathleen McCampbell ART DIRECTION: Thomas Charvériat, Anto Lau SCENOGRAPHY: Jean Le Guyader SOUND SCORE: David Poppell (Long MP3/FLAC) VIDEO: Video Documentation by Irmantas Bortnikas & Anto Lau RESEARCH: Fred Farrow, Jiang Linping 江琳萍, Lin Zang 臧琳, Chris Warnock ART RESEARCH: Jin Yun 金云, Tang Dashi 汤大师 & He Dashi 贺大师 COORDINATION: Yeung Sin Ching 杨倩菁, Adam Hsieh 谢昕 VENUE: island6 ShGarden, 50 Moganshan Road, building #7, G/F, Shanghai ARTISTS: island6 art collective (Liu Dao 六岛) Learn more: http://www.island6.org/BrokenBonesAndBruises.html

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          • Xu Bing on PBS Art Loft

            05:41

            from News Travels Fast Added 26 0 0

            Watch Chinese artist Xu Bing on PBS Art Loft, interviewed about his exhibition "Writing Between Heaven and Earth" at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum FIU - along with the museum's director Jordana Pomeroy and FIU Professor Lidu Yi (Curator of the exhibition).

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            • BLUE&YELLOW ANIMATION

              00:48

              from Elle Farley Added 10 0 0

              Created for Propeller TV. Blue & Yellow: Swift Transitions of Chinese Contemporary Art was the biggest single collection of contemporary Chinese art to be shown in London. The programme looks over the past 30 years, the Chinese contemporary art world has been born out of the profound political and social changes experienced by the nation. This animation was created to support the narration within the programme. You can watch the programme here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj2xbZszRXw&list=PL1Kw2N54YqYFyade5l_FI-5xHzGqVlKkV&index=10

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              • BLUE&YELLOW OPENING TITLE (CHINESE VERSION)

                00:07

                from Elle Farley Added 4 0 0

                Created for Propeller TV. Blue & Yellow: Swift Transitions of Chinese Contemporary Art was the biggest single collection of contemporary Chinese art to be shown in London. The programme looks over the past 30 years, the Chinese contemporary art world has been born out of the profound political and social changes experienced by the nation. You can watch the programme here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj2xbZszRXw&list=PL1Kw2N54YqYFyade5l_FI-5xHzGqVlKkV&index=10

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                • BLUE&YELLOW OPENING TITLE (ENGLISH VERSION)

                  00:09

                  from Elle Farley Added 2 0 0

                  Created for Propeller TV. Blue & Yellow: Swift Transitions of Chinese Contemporary Art was the biggest single collection of contemporary Chinese art to be shown in London. The programme looks over the past 30 years, the Chinese contemporary art world has been born out of the profound political and social changes experienced by the nation. You can watch the programme here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj2xbZszRXw&list=PL1Kw2N54YqYFyade5l_FI-5xHzGqVlKkV&index=10

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                  • Ai Weiwei @ Large at ALCATRAZ

                    13:24

                    from James Kalm Added 9 0 0

                    James Kalm finds himself in San Francisco for New Years, and, even without his bike, he's sniffing around looking at art. Alcatraz is the infamous "Rock" mythologized in movies and TV as one of the worlds most isolated prisons. Yet it is here that Weiwei has located works dealing with the concepts of freedom and man's natural state of community. Various pieces provoke visitors to contemplate the current state of political dissidents, prisoners of conscience, and refugees. The installations fill thousands of square feet, present the works of many volunteers and team members, and elicit spectators engagement in correspondence with prisoners. A musical introduction is provided by The Dolomites http://dolomitesmuzik.com.

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                    • Thanks for That

                      03:47

                      from paul manfredi Added 36 0 0

                      This is the Chinese poet, painter and arts organizer Yan Li reading his poem "Thanks for That". Added to this are some of Yan Li's own paintings. English language translation of Yan's poem is provided by Denis Mair.

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