1. Tall Fescue

    49:30

    from CCE Horticulture / Added

    15 Plays / / 0 Comments

    February 19, 2015 This Cornell turfgrass research update, specifically around use of fescue varieties is presented by Mary Thurn Research Support Specialist from the Cornell Turfgrass Team in Horticulture. Turfgrass is often an integral part of the landscape. Selection of species that require less water, fertilizer and pesticides while providing acceptable visual appeal and performance is critical when environmental or budget concerns require reduced inputs. Deep-rooted and drought tolerant, tall fescue has come a long way since the introduction of K-31 in the 1940’s. Improved characteristics of turf-type tall fescue varieties have led to increased use in many situations, including home lawns, school grounds and athletic fields. Learn about the advantages and disadvantages of this versatile turfgrass species and how it may fit into ecological landscape management strategies. This presentation may contain pesticide recommendations. Changes in pesticide regulations occur constantly, some materials mentioned may no longer be available, and some uses may no longer be legal. All pesticides distributed, sold, and/or applied in New York State must be registered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Questions concerning the legality and/or registration status for pesticide use in New York State should be directed to the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialist or your regional DEC office. READ THE LABEL BEFORE APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE. Organized by Cornell Cooperative Extension Sustainable Landscape Program Work Team.

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    • Hemlock Woolly Adelgid update 2014

      59:14

      from CCE Horticulture / Added

      44 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Record Monday December 8, 2014. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid update is presented by Mark Whitmore - extension faculty in Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Whitmore discuss the life history and detection of HWA then focus on what can be done to keep trees alive in the short term as well as the long term prospects for biological control and how everyone can participate in this process. Additional fact sheet: The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in the Finger Lakes, an Update http://www.nyis.info/user_uploads/files/The%20Hemlock%20Woolly%20Adelgid%20in%20New%20York%20State%2014%20June%202013-1.pdf This presentation may contain pesticide recommendations. Changes in pesticide regulations occur constantly, some materials mentioned may no longer be available, and some uses may no longer be legal. All pesticides distributed, sold, and/or applied in New York State must be registered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Questions concerning the legality and/or registration status for pesticide use in New York State should be directed to the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialist or your regional DEC office. READ THE LABEL BEFORE APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE.

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      • Community ReUse Center Template - Webinar from June 24, 2014

        53:51

        from Finger Lakes ReUse / Added

        32 Plays / / 0 Comments

        This webinar introduces the Community ReUse Center Template (http://template.fingerlakesreuse.org) and was held on June 24, 2014. More on this project: Finger Lakes ReUse has developed an easy-to-follow guide for New York State communities interested in developing Community ReUse Centers in their cities and towns in partnership with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County (CCETC), with funding from the New York State Pollution Prevention Institute (NYSP2I). The interactive, online template assists communities in replicating the successful nonprofit Community ReUse Center model established by Finger Lakes ReUse in 2008. The template is free of charge and designed and distributed as a tool for communities to transform liabilities into assets by reducing solid waste generation, creating quality “green” jobs, and developing a skilled workforce through the creation of nonprofit Community ReUse Centers. The interactive template provides specific information essential to starting and growing a successful reuse operation and includes guidelines for: - Generating community buy-in - Conducting market research on consumers and generators of reusable materials - Understanding and developing the components of a business plan - Operating a non-profit organization according to New York State rules and regulations Finger Lakes ReUse will be able to provide free limited consultations to New York State communities thanks to funding from NYSP2I beginning in August 2014. Please visit the Community ReUse Center Template site for more information about this opportunity. Funding provided by the NYS Pollution Prevention Institute through a grant from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Environmental Conservation.

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        • Recovering Our Urban Forests: Update on Invasive Pests (& Invasive Practices)

          57:21

          from CCE Horticulture / Added

          26 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Recorded on April 16, 2014 as part of the 2014 Cornell Landscape Webinar Series. Sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension Sustainable Landscapes-Horticulture Program Work Team. Rick Harper, UMass Extension Assistant Professor, will discuss the urban forest health condition of our nation's community trees. Rick will include information about underlying causes – both pests and cultural practices – and share integrated solutions that include chemical and non-chemical options. This presentation may contain pesticide recommendations. Changes in pesticide regulations occur constantly, some materials mentioned may no longer be available, and some uses may no longer be legal. All pesticides distributed, sold, and/or applied in New York State must be registered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Questions concerning the legality and/or registration status for pesticide use in New York State should be directed to the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialist or your regional DEC office. READ THE LABEL BEFORE APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE.

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          • Woody Shrubs for Stormwater Retention Practices

            01:00:27

            from CCE Horticulture / Added

            69 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Recorded on April 16, 2014 as part of the 2014 Cornell Landscape Webinar Series. Sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension Sustainable Landscapes-Horticulture Program Work Team. Dr. Nina Bassuk, of Cornell University and the Urban Horticulture Institute, shares how woody shrubs can provide low-maintenance, attractive cover for stormwater retention and infiltration applications such as filter strips, swales and rain gardens. Dr. Bassuk discusses how utilizing woody plants rather than herbaceous plants decreases the need for additional seasonal maintenance while successfully adding aesthetic and functional vegetation to stormwater retention practices. See full publication on this topic at: http://www.hort.cornell.edu/uhi/outreach/pdfs/woody_shrubs_stormwater_low_res.pdf This presentation may contain pesticide recommendations. Changes in pesticide regulations occur constantly, some materials mentioned may no longer be available, and some uses may no longer be legal. All pesticides distributed, sold, and/or applied in New York State must be registered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Questions concerning the legality and/or registration status for pesticide use in New York State should be directed to the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialist or your regional DEC office. READ THE LABEL BEFORE APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE.

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            • Landscape with Nature: Planting with Beneficial Insects in Mind, an Integrated Approach

              46:26

              from CCE Horticulture / Added

              71 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Recorded on March 19, 2014 as part of the 2014 Cornell Landscape Webinar Series. Sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension Sustainable Landscapes-Horticulture Program Work Team. Beneficial insects can be a boon to your landscape management efforts. But do you always recognize the good guys from the bad? Dr. Elizabeth Lamb of New York State Integrated Pest Management (NYS IPM) will bring an integrated approach to landscape planning and maintenance with beneficial insects in mind, and show you how beneficial insects can be part of your landscape management plan. This presentation may contain pesticide recommendations. Changes in pesticide regulations occur constantly, some materials mentioned may no longer be available, and some uses may no longer be legal. All pesticides distributed, sold, and/or applied in New York State must be registered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Questions concerning the legality and/or registration status for pesticide use in New York State should be directed to the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialist or your regional DEC office. READ THE LABEL BEFORE APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE.

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              • The Root Connection: How the Root Environment Impacts Landscape Success

                56:32

                from CCE Horticulture / Added

                64 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Recorded on March 19, 2014 as part of the 2014 Cornell Landscape Webinar Series. Sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension Sustainable Landscapes-Horticulture Program Work Team. Dr. Taryn Bauerle in the Department of Horticulture, Cornell University discusses the interaction between plant roots and their biotic environment with a case study on some common root pathogens. For a root system expanding during plant establishment, the defenses of roots may differ, with corresponding impacts on disease development. Dr. Bauerle discusses how selecting plants with particular root characteristics may influence their success in the landscape. This presentation may contain pesticide recommendations. Changes in pesticide regulations occur constantly, some materials mentioned may no longer be available, and some uses may no longer be legal. All pesticides distributed, sold, and/or applied in New York State must be registered with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Questions concerning the legality and/or registration status for pesticide use in New York State should be directed to the appropriate Cornell Cooperative Extension Specialist or your regional DEC office. READ THE LABEL BEFORE APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE.

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                • Designing Polycultures for the Garden

                  42:36

                  from CCE Horticulture / Added

                  109 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  View this presentation and accompanying handouts (available at gardening.cornell.edu/polycultures) to learn more about polyculture as a community of multifunctional plants, animals, and fungi that is designed for functional interconnection. Record March 2014 by Steve Gabriel in the Cornell Garden-Based Learning program (gardening.cornell.edu). This was originally presented to Cornell Cooperative Extension educators and Master Gardener Volunteers in fall of 2013 as part of the Cornell Garden-Based Learning Regional Training around 2014 Growing Season Educational Campaign: Designing for Garden Ecosystems. Find more opportunities for expanding your gardening knowledge, skills and experience through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension Associations. Find their Contact information at blogs.cornell.edu/horticulture/about/cce-info/

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                  • Ecology for Garden Design

                    01:34:02

                    from CCE Horticulture / Added

                    171 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    View this presentation and accompanying handouts (available at gardening.cornell.edu/polycultures) to learn about how abiotic (non-living) factors, producers, consumers, and decomposers are all important parts of a garden ecosystem and discover methods to improve the ecological health of your garden. Record March 2014 by Steve Gabriel in the Cornell Garden-Based Learning program (gardening.cornell.edu). This was originally presented to Cornell Cooperative Extension educators and Master Gardener Volunteers in fall of 2013 as part of the Cornell Garden-Based Learning Regional Training around 2014 Growing Season Educational Campaign: Designing for Garden Ecosystems. Find more opportunities for expanding your gardening knowledge, skills and experience through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension Associations. Find their Contact information at blogs.cornell.edu/horticulture/about/cce-info/

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                    • Activity Instructions for Dig into Designing Polycultures for a Garden Setting

                      06:53

                      from CCE Horticulture / Added

                      154 Plays / / 2 Comments

                      These instructions compliment the resources provided at gardening.cornell.edu/polycultures Team up with family and friends to design garden polycultures for your backyards or bring together a community or school group to create a design for place in your community. Record March 2014 by Steve Gabriel in the Cornell Garden-Based Learning program (gardening.cornell.edu). This activity was originally piloted with Cornell Cooperative Extension educators and Master Gardener Volunteers in fall of 2013 part of the Cornell Garden-Based Learning Regional Training around 2014 Growing Season Educational Campaign: Designing for Garden Ecosystems. Find more opportunities for expanding your gardening knowledge, skills and experience through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension Associations. Find their Contact information at http://blogs.cornell.edu/horticulture/about/cce-info/

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