1. 2015 Scout Guide Flag Raising in Bracebridge

    01:12

    from Shawn Forth / Added

    41 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Bracebridge Mayor Graydon Smith joined Scouts and Guides to raise the flag recognizing Scout-Guide Week in the Town of Bracebridge Scout-Guide Week - Feb. 15 - 22 2015 Whispering Pines Area Scouting www.facebook.com/CottageCountryScouting www.twitter.com/wpscouting www.scouts.ca

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    • 2-17 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 17, 2014

      04:34

      from Bearstudy Videos / Added

      54 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Description of video for visually/hearing impaired: February 17 2014 - Juliet (0:04) 03.22 Video is in black and white, with camera looking into the den through a triangular 'window', framed by logs on the left side and a curving branch to the right. It is snowing and windy, with the snow blown diagonally to the left. Juliet is lying with her head facing right, partly hidden by all the bedding material. The cubs are not visible. Next Segment (0:20) 03.27 One cub head visible, popping out from between Juliet's back leg and her body. The cub is crying as it moves from right to left, before disappearing back into Juliet's fur. The cub continues to cry, verging on a scream after it vanishes. She lies quietly while this is happening, apart from one little grunt to the cub. Next Segment (0.38) 09.05 Juliet, head raised and looking towards the camera, starts to move towards the front of the den to eat snow, exhaling as she moves. She then pulls back into the den and looks directly towards the camera, before tucking her head back down into hibernation position. Next Segment (1:09) 13.49 Snowing, Juliet is curled up in the den. One of the cubs pops its head up, nose first, then waves its right front leg. Shortly afterwards the cub's ears appear above Juliet's leg. The cub is crying as it moves. Juliet remains asleep. Next Segment (1:26) 14.21 Juliet is curled up. One of the cubs is active, poking its nose out and waving its front legs, almost as though it is trying to climb on Juliet's head. Juliet gives an occasional soft grunt as the little one squirms, but doesn't move. Next Segment (1:52) 15.51 Cubs nursing audibly. Juliet facing right and eating snow, the fur on her back is frosted. She then moves to the front of the den to eat snow, showing a long tongue as she licks at the snow. The cubs continue to nurse as she moves. Next Segment (2:24) 14.52 Juliet continuing to eat snow at the front of the den, while cubs nurse audibly. Next Segment (2:50) 15.54 Cubs still nursing while Juliet eats snow from logs on left. She then turns back into the den, sitting facing right, and shakes, then stretches her right hind leg. Juliet starts to gnaw on a branch, or small stem, on the right side of the den, pulling small pieces off, most of which she drops into the bedding material but some get chewed and eaten. The cubs nurse throughout. ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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      • 2-16 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 16, 2014

        03:21

        from Bearstudy Videos / Added

        43 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Description of video for visually/hearing impaired: February 16, 2014 - Juliet (0:03) 07.07 The video is in black & white. The camera is offset to the left, looking into Juliet's den through a triangular space flanked by logs and branches. Juliet is lying curled up a heap of bedding material, with the back of her head towards the camera. At least two cubs are audibly fussing, then two squirming cubs appear from beneath her, still crying. Juliet lifts her head to attend to the cubs. Next segment (0.36) 13.28 Juliet is up on all fours, facing the den entrance, with cubs whimpering, but out of sight.She moves in a rocking motion, occasionally checking on the cubs, before shaking herself and moving forward to eat snow from the logs on the left of the screen.Then she pushes her head out of the den to eat more snow, filling the screen with a shot of her head and ears and blocking the view into the den. Next segment (1:20) 13.29 Juliet is still eating snow in front of the den, with cubs whimpering but out of sight. She lifts her head and blows, then sits back into the den for a good stretch, extending her front legs and her neck, before leaning forwards to eat snow outside the den once more. Next segment (1:44) 13.29.37 Juliet's head is still outside the den as she continues to eat snow. She then moves backwards into the den and shakes herself. The cubs are out of sight, but at least one is still whimpering and Juliet looks down towards the cubs, before having another shake. She looks down again, then yawns and moves her head from side to side. Next segment (2:22) 22.34 Juliet is lying quietly, with her head to the right of our screen. At least two cubs are nursing audibly, there is a deeper hum and one higher pitched hum, which gets faster during the clip. ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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        • 2-15 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 15, 2014

          10:48

          from Bearstudy Videos / Added

          46 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Description of video for visually/hearing impaired: February 15, 2014 - Juliet the Black Bear (0:02) 1.33.08 A cub is barely visible, mostly tucked into Juliet’s fur. A bit of moaning and we see the little paw poke up through Juliet’s fur. Next segment - (0.:19) 1.49.28 We now see two cubs moving around in the same spot. Little paws and noses moving around, otherwise the den is quiet and sleeping. Next segment - 0:38 1.52.48 One cub is moving and squeaking. Pushing at Juliet. Juliet lifts her arm to accommodate the cub as it climbs back in. More squeaks. Next segment - 0:58 3.16.54 Juliet begins to stir when a cub squeaks. She lifts her leg and a cub falls backward so it is visible, but moves back under Juliet. Next segment - 1:26 14.02.12 Snowing. Juliet has back to camera and raises her head to look at the camera, licks the air and shakes her head. She then stands up and one cub falls from the nipple to the ground (you can hear the pop from the release of suction). We see the cubs moving around under Juliet’s belly as she stands on all 4s. Next segment - 2:08 14.04.20 Juliet is still standing on all 4s, facing to the back right. Cub is squeaking. Juliet looks underneath and turns to face camera, then extends her neck to lick some snow. Cubs continue to squeak, she looks down to check on them. Juliet rakes bedding down into the nest from her left, our right. She brings in quite a bit of new bedding toward the cubs. One cub begins to nurse while Julie rakes. Another cub begins to nurse. As she moves we can see the cubs nursing under her. She stretches, extending her rear right leg. She then brings bedding in from the other side of the den, nosing it to begin with then raking with her paw. Juliet moves toward the camera and looks like she is eating snow. Next segment - 4:28 14:08:35 Juliet is very close to the camera eating snow, then goes back into the den, the cubs are squeaking and moaning. Juliet looks at the cubs then shakes her head. Cub partially visible. Juliet tends to cub, nosing it towards the other cubs. We see little heads bobbing around. Next segment - 5:14 14.10.04 Juliet is raking, trying to get at some bedding under the logs. Cubs are quiet. Next segment - 5:28 14.10.36 Juliet is scratching on a log in her den to our left. As she does we see the cubs moving around under her. Next segment - 5:47 14.13.09 Juliet continues to scratch at the log. Cub visible, looking straight at the camera, trying to keep it’s balance as Juliet moves around while scratching. One cub is squeaking. Next segment - 6:20 14.16.36 Juliet continues to scratch on the log. Cubs are being pushed around by Juliet’s stomach as she scratches, they are complaining. They do not seem to be too happy with all the moving around. Two cubs visible, they begin nursing. Juliet goes back to tearing at the log, knocking the cub off the nipple, it complains. Next segment - 7:23 14.18.38 Juliet is determined to tear apart this log. Two cubs are visible and screaming. They are trying to nurse but with all the movement it is too hard for them to latch on. Cubs are not happy. Juliet stops scratching after nearly eleven minutes of tearing at the log and tends to her cubs, turning to her right and curling into a nursing position. ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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          • 2-14 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 14, 2014

            06:41

            from Bearstudy Videos / Added

            446 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Description of video for visually/hearing impaired: February 14, 2014 - Juliet (0:02) 11.05 Cubs are screaming, Juliet lifts up to tend to them. She is facing the entrance to the den so when she lifts up we see the cubs. She licks one, they settle down and start nursing. Next Segment - (0:42) 11.10 One cub is still complaining. Juliet lifts up and yawns, we see cubs under her chin then shakes her head. She then stretches her neck to lick up some snow that has blown in. The one cub that is fussing is directly in front near the entrance on it’s back,we see little feet. Cute. Next Segment - (1:38) 13.52 Juliet is laying on her right side with her head pointed toward the camera. Cub is fussing, she picks up her left front arm to move it closer so it can nurse. Next Segment - (1:57) 13.53 Still fussing, she lifts up and looks out the den, almost in a “count to ten” fashion. As she does, we see cubs. Then she yawns and settles her head back down. Next Segment - (2:14) 13.54 All cubs are now nursing happily. Juliet lifts her head up and one cub starts screaming. She then lifts up on her elbow and begins to clean one of the cubs. Next Segment - (3:06) 14.20 Screaming cubs, one is facing out from under Juliet, we see the head and light colored ears. Next Segment - (3:33) 14.21 We see an adorable scene, cub sleepily raises it’s paw and stretches, face is clear. Next Segment - (4:03) 16.30 One cub is very upset, Juliet changes position and when she does we see all 3 cubs tumbling and kicking around. They are not too happy about being shuffled about. Juliet shakes her fur Next Segment - (5:21) 23.32 Later in the evening, cubs are nursing, Juliet moves her front leg so we can see a cub. We can see them moving around as they nurse. Next Segment - (5:52) 23.33 All cubs are nursing happily as the day closes. ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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            • 2-13 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 13, 2014

              06:57

              from Bearstudy Videos / Added

              10 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Description of video for visually/hearing impaired: February 13, 2014 - Juliet (0:02) 10.57am Cubs are nursing, Juliet is hovered over them. She lifts up her head, pointed to our right, and with her back right foot, scratches the top of her head, then behind her neck, them moving to her back. Stretching her leg, then pulling it back in to her body. Next Segment - (0:52) 11.00 Juliet stretches her leg again and reaches to the back of the den to lap up a little snow. With her leg still extended, she grooms her upper right back leg. Moving up the leg, she grooms her thigh and back flank with her teeth, then scratching with her right front paw. Cubs are nursing. She is really getting into scratching when she hears a thunk, she stops and turns to the cubs. Next Segment - (2:27) 11.01 Juliet is facing to our right, looking near the back of the den. She then starts tearing at the overhead branch with her teeth, tearing off little chunks for bedding. Next Segment - (3:32) 11.03 She is now reaching the back of the den, lapping up snow. We can see her tongue working on the almost out of reach snow. Cubs are nursing so she stretches rather than moves closer. Next Segment - (4:20) 11.06 She finishes lapping up snow and begins to work on a new area of the overhead branch further away from the camera. She then starts on a different branch directly overhead. Cubs start complaining and she pauses. Next Segment - (5:25) 11.07 Once again, she is working on the overhead branch, but this time with her right front paw, tearing pieces and strips off. Next Segment - (6:01) 19.25 Later in the evening, about 7:30pm wind is howling, cubs are nursing, we can barely see one of them moving around. It was the only time we even slightly saw a cub on this cold winter day. Temps were a high of 11°F with a low of negative 11°F. Juliet yawns and looks out the entrance of the den until a cub screams and she turns her attention to that. ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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              • Cubs Tubing Excursion Feb 2015

                03:19

                from Steven Majaury / Added

                45 Plays / / 0 Comments

                This is a short video (edited on my phone during the bus ride home) showing some of the tubing fun at Valcartier Village Vacances. The Montreal West Scouts took the Wolf Cubs on a weekend trip to Québec City to experience Carnaval. Many thanks to the hard-working leaders who ensured that everyone had a great time!

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                • BearPodcast 555 - It’s a Fantasy Fairy Tale

                  53:01

                  from Nard P / Added

                  9 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Visit us at http://bearpodcast.com Hosts: Nard and Ray Nard and Ray went to dim sum. We did a movie review of Jupiter Ascending. We talked about Spider-Man, Grammy Awards, a gay teen threatened to be expelled, Japanese robot receptionists, and a guy with a giant testicle. Listen to the show on Stitcher Radio, and on Bear Radio Network! E-mail: show (at) bearpodcast.com Call our voicemail line at 206-222-BEAR

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                  • 2-12 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 12, 2014 - Part 2 of 2

                    06:21

                    from Bearstudy Videos / Added

                    25 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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                    • 2-12 - Juliet the Black Bear - February 12, 2014 - Part 1 of 2

                      05:57

                      from Bearstudy Videos / Added

                      24 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~ Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it. Visit http://www.bearstudy.org/website/updates/daily-updates.html to read the nightly updates from the researchers. ~~~~~ At the Wildlife Research Institute, biologists Lynn Rogers, Ph.D. and Sue Mansfield, M.S., along with their team of researchers, have spent over 44 years studying black bears and sharing their information with the public. Their work has been recognized as one of the four major studies of large mammals in the world. Using trust rather than traps and tranquilizers, they have conducted the longest, most detailed study of black bear behavior and ecology ever done. A focus is on reducing bear-human conflict. They share information with the public through publications, lectures, field courses, the Internet (bear.org and bearstudy.org), TV documentaries, and the North American Bear Center. The Center is dedicated to advancing the long-term survival of bear populations by replacing misconceptions with facts. Many people say these nonprofit organizations have changed their lives by giving them a better understanding about black bears and making it possible for them to fully enjoy living and hiking in bear habitat. Visit http://www.bear.org and http://www.bearstudy.org to learn more about the research and the bears who are part of it.

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